Dec 08, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code, Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Legend:

◎ = Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

= Civic Engagement and Service Learning

 

Finance

  
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    △ FIN 390 - Intermediate Corporate Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    A blend of theory and applications to assist financial decision makers. This course covers long-term investment decisions, capital structure issues, long-term financing, and short-term management in the context of a global orientation. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.


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    FIN 399 - Internship Problem


    (3 S.H.)

    Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business, completion of business core courses, 2.5 GPA, and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    FIN 404 - Commercial Bank Management


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of financial management issues of commercial banks and other financial institutions including institution performance, investments, asset/liability strategies, management of liquidity, securities, loans and other assets, and capital, deposits, and other sources of funds. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    ◎ FIN 421 - Institutional Investment and Financial Markets


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of portfolio management decision-making in this age of innovative global financial markets, new financial instruments and instantaneous worldwide communications. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only. Offered annually (usually fall semester).


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    FIN 422 - Student Managed Investment Fund


    (1-3 S.H.)

    This course provides hands on training in security analysis and portfolio management using the Student Managed Investment Fund provided by the WSU Foundation. Students will apply the theoretical knowledge of finance to manage a real-world portfolio. Prerequisites: admission to College of Business and ◆ FIN 377 - Investments  or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered each semester. Note: Only three credits may be used to meet major or minor requirements. Repeatable.


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    FIN 423 - Derivative Securities


    (3 S.H.)

    The application and valuation of financial securities whose value is contingent on the value of other securities. The primary concentration is on option and futures contracts; however, application of the option valuation model to other areas of finance will also be introduced. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business, MATH 140 - Applied Calculus  or MATH 212 - Calculus I , and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.


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    FIN 430 - Fixed Income Securities


    (3 S.H.)

    This course explores key issues in fixed income securities, especially corporate bonds including the pricing of bonds, measuring bond yields and volatility, factors affecting yields and the term structure of interest rates as well as selected advanced issues. It also covers bond portfolio management and bond performance evaluation. Prerequisite: FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only. Offered summer session.


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    FIN 440 - International Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the world of financial management as it applies to multinational corporations and other firms that engage in international transactions. Topics include the nature of the international financial system, foreign exchange management, investment financing, and risk management issues of concern to international businesses. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    FIN 471 - Real Estate Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    The structure and operation of the primary and secondary mortgage markets, instruments, techniques, and strategies in financing real property investments including developing projects. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    FIN 473 - Real Estate Investment


    (3 S.H.)

    Development of the feasibility process, the major tool used in analysis of investment opportunities, with a view to determining highest and best use. Topics include market analysis, cash flow analysis, tax considerations, investment performance, risk analysis, and passive investments in real estate. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    FIN 480 - Independent Studies in Finance


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Offers advanced students an opportunity to do additional reading and/or research in areas of special interest. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and instructor’s permission. Total credits may not exceed six. Grade only.


    Course Registration


French

  
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    FREN 101 - Elementary French I


    (4 S.H.)

    Introductory French for students with little or no prior French training. Instruction in speaking, listening, reading, and writing through classroom drills and language lab work. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    FREN 201 - Intermediate French I


    (4 S.H.)

    Further development of communication skills. In-depth study of grammar. Selected readings in French. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Prerequisite: FREN 102 - Elementary French II  or equivalent of three years of high school French. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    FREN 202 - Intermediate French II


    (4 S.H.)

    Continuation of FREN 201. Further development of all the skills essential for communication. Further development of understanding written and spoken French. Practice in translation and practice in writing accentuated. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Prerequisite: FREN 201 - Intermediate French I  or equivalent of 4-5 years of high school French. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    FREN 203 - Intermediate French: French Cinema I


    (4 S.H.)

    An intermediate-level French language course, this introduction to French cinema is designed to integrate French grammar practice of oral, writing, reading, and listening competencies through the study of film in the second-year. Meeting GOAL 6 (Humanities). Prerequisite: FREN 102 - Elementary French II  or equivalent level with placement exam or instructor permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered alternate years.


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    FREN 301 - French Composition


    (4 S.H.)

    This course reinforces skills in written French through translation of a wide variety of texts taken from various fields such as business and literature. The writing of poems, essays, and articles in French is practiced in order to reinforce and refine writing skills. Prerequisite:  FREN 202 - Intermediate French II  or equivalent. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    FREN 305 - Special Topics in French and Francophone Literature and Culture


    (4 S.H.)

    This advanced-level French course is centered on directed readings in French and/or Francophone literature and culture. This course will help students further hone their ability to communicate in spoken and written French while gaining a deeper understanding of French and Francophone culture within the context of a specific topic. Classroom activities will be structured around the theme in order to integrate various oral and written formats such as conversation, reading, writing, discussion of cultural and literary topics, role play and multi-media activities. Prerequisite: Two 200-level French courses or equivalent with placement exam and/or instructor permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered at department discretion. Repeatable as topics change.


    Course Registration


Geography

  
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    GEOG 110 - World Regional Geography


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of physical and cultural aspects of world regions including landforms; climate; levels of economic development; cultural diffusion; attitudes toward the land, the social structure, and values. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 211 - Economic Geography


    (3 S.H.)

    A systematic study of the geographic bases of human economic activities in agriculture, mining, and manufacturing. This course explains—by theory and example—why, where, and how activities are distributed in our economic world. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 212 - Physical Geography


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the significance and aerial distribution of various physical elements of our environment with emphasis on climate, landforms, gradational work of streams, and glaciation. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 213 - Cultural Geography


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the significance and aerial distribution of various cultural elements of our environment with emphasis on population, cultural origins, language, religion, and agriculture. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 223 - Geography of Asia


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the physical landscape and cultural features of Asia. Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 224 - Geography of Africa


    (3 S.H.)

    Natural setting, distribution of people, important occupations and problems of Africa’s future development. Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 225 - Geography of Latin America


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the complex cultural, racial, political, demographic, and economic patterns which have developed in Latin American since 1492 - within its physical geographic setting. Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 233 - Geography of the Middle East


    (3 S.H.)

    Environmental setting, population distribution, important occupations, crossroads, functions, and problems of development. Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 320 - Geography of the United States


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the various regions of the United States with emphasis on the ways in which physical geography, sources of economic activity, and cultural heritage combine to produce the unique character of each region. Meets GOAL 7. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 326 - Geography of Europe


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of nations, regions, and economies of Europe with special attention to current problem areas. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    GEOG 332 - Geography of Canada


    (3 S.H.)

    A detailed examination of Canada’s geography with special emphasis on developmental problems. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 349 - Maps and Air Photos


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the elements of map scale and projection, and the use of air photos in map preparation. Practice in reading and interpreting various kinds and series of maps. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 370 - The Geography of Tourism


    (3 S.H.)

    An in depth study of tourist locations in the US and the world. This course studies the origin, development, and spread of tourism. The course also emphasizes detailed examination and classification of tourist types and locations. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 450 - Cartography


    (3 S.H.)

    Theory and design of map-making skills using a variety of techniques in the production and reproduction of qualitative and quantitative maps. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 455 - Remote Sensing


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of various remote sensing techniques including radar, infrared, high-altitude photography and LANDSAT earth satellite imagery, and their application to geographical inquiry in areas such as land use, agriculture, forest and range management, and urban studies. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOG 490 - Independent Reading in Geography


    (1-3 S.H.)

    A course designed to aid those planning to attend graduate school or who have a special area of interest which they desire to pursue beyond formal course limits. Work is undertaken with an instructor chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered by arrangement.


    Course Registration


Geoscience

  
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    GEOS 090 - Earth Talks Speaker Series


    (0 S.H.)

    The course entails student attendance to the Earth Talks Speaker Series hosted each semester by the Geoscience Department. The series serves as a forum through which experts from academia, government, and the private sector, as well as WSU students and faculty, share their experiences and research results with the WSU Geoscience community. The series also provides a venue for discussions of professional, educational, and employment issues related to Geology, Natural Resources, Earth Science teaching, and other related disciplines. P/NC only. Offered each semester Note: Waivers to the normal number of required enrollments are considered by the Department Chair. For example, waivers will be granted as necessary for transfer students who will not be in residence at WSU for six semester. Repeatable: Passing grade in six enrollments normally required of Geoscience and Earth Science (Teaching) majors; four enrollments normally required of Geoscience minors.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 100 - Minnesota’s Rocks and Waters


    (3 S.H.)

    Introduction to Minnesota’s geological history focusing on such topics as Minnesota’s rock record and history, fossils, mining, soils, lakes, rivers and ground water. Includes laboratory and field experiences. Meets GOAL 3 and GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered annually (usually fall semester). Note: Students may enroll in either GEOS 100 or GEOS 101 - Minnesota’s Rocks and Waters with Lab , but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 101 - Minnesota’s Rocks and Waters with Lab


    (4 S.H.)

    Introduction to Minnesota’s geological history focusing on such topics as Minnesota’s rock record and history, fossils, mining, soils, lakes, rivers and ground water. Laboratory and field experiences. Meets GOAL 3 and GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered annually (usually fall semester).


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 102 - Resources of the Earth


    (3 S.H.)

    An exploration of historic, current, and future global resources. Discussions cover renewable and non-renewable material and energy resources. Geologic processes, environmental impacts, and economic considerations for each are explored. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 103 - Natural Disasters


    (3 S.H.)

    An investigative exploration of significant geohazards impacting the Earth with emphasis on volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides and other hill slope failures, hurricanes and tornadoes, pollution and floods. Geologic processes governing each type of disaster are explored. Prediction, impacts and mitigation potential for each hazard are examined. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 3 and GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 104 - Catastrophes and Extinctions


    (3 S.H.)

    More than 99% of species that have lived on Earth are now extinct. This course examines the history of the Earth and life through the lens of catastrophism - the idea that sudden, worldwide, often violent events have played a major role in the evolution of the Earth and the organisms that inhabit it. It stresses the idea that Earth is an interconnected system and that the parts of the system (lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere) interact with and affect each other. The course covers topics such as deep time, the formation of the solar system and Earth, Earth processes such as plate tectonics and climate change, fossils and evolution, mass extinctions and their possible causes, and humanity’s role in extinction events. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered fall semester alternate years. Note: Students may enroll in either this course or GEOS 114 - Catastrophes and Extinctions with Laboratory , but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 105 - Astronomy with Laboratory


    (4 S.H.)

    History of astronomy. Study of the planets, their moons, comets, asteroids, meteors, and other planetary bodies. Origin of the universe, solar system, sun, and other stars. Lecture, laboratory, and observation required. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered annually, usually fall semester. Note: Students may enroll in either GEOS 105 or GEOS 106 - Astronomy , but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 106 - Astronomy


    (3 S.H.)

    History of astronomy. Study of the planets, their moons, comets, asteroids, meteors, and other planetary bodies. Origin of the universe, solar system, sun, and other stars. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered annually, usually fall semester. Note: Students may enroll in either GEOS 105 - Astronomy with Laboratory  or GEOS 106, but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 107 - Geology in the National Parks


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of geology in U.S. National Parks reveals how Earth processes have interacted with one another and with the bedrock to create landscapes and the geological framework of the North American Continent. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered when demand warrants.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 108 - Geology of the Mississippi River


    (3 S.H.)

    Investigation of the geologic history, river processes, and resource management of large rivers, particularly focusing on the Mississippi River. Topics include an exploration of the relationship between the Mississippi River and its watershed, soils, groundwater, bedrock geology, and humans. Concepts emphasized will include the hydrologic cycle, plate tectonics, river morphology, river dynamics, resource management, and public policy issues. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered when demand warrants.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 110 - Oceanography with Laboratory


    (4 S.H.)

    Introduction to oceans including the ocean floor, marine sediments, composition of sea water, ocean currents, waves and tides, marine biology, and oceanic resources. Lecture and laboratory required. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered alternate years, usually spring semester. Note: Students may enroll in either GEOS 110 or GEOS 111 - Oceanography , but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 111 - Oceanography


    (3 S.H.)

    Introduction to oceans including the ocean floor, marine sediments, composition of sea water, ocean currents, waves and tides, marine biology, and oceanic resources. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered when demand warrants. Note: Students may enroll in either  GEOS 110 - Oceanography with Laboratory  or GEOS 111, but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 113 - Natural Disasters with Laboratory


    (4 S.H.)

    An investigative exploration of significant geohazards impacting the Earth with emphasis on volcanoes, earthquakes, landslides and other hill slope failures, hurricanes, tornadoes and floods. Geologic processes governing each type of disaster are explored. Prediction, impacts and mitigation potential for each hazard are examined. Climate change, human influence on the impacts of a changing climate on weather-related disasters will be discussed. Meets GOAL 3 and GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered annually. Note: Students may enroll in either GEOS 113 or GEOS 103 - Natural Disasters , but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 114 - Catastrophes and Extinctions with Laboratory


    (4 S.H.)

    More than 99% of species that have lived on Earth are now extinct. This course examines the history of the Earth and life through the lens of catastrophism - the idea that sudden, worldwide, often violent events have played a major role in the evolution of the Earth and the organisms that inhabit it. It stresses the idea that Earth is an interconnected system and that the parts of the system (lithosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere and biosphere) interact with and affect each other. The course covers topics such as deep time, the formation of the solar system and Earth, Earth processes such as plate tectonics and climate change, fossils and evolution, mass extinctions and their possible causes, and humanity’s role in extinction events. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered fall semester alternate years. Note: Students may enroll in either GEOS 114 or GEOS 104 - Catastrophes and Extinctions , but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 115 - Meteorology with Laboratory


    (4 S.H.)

    Study of Earth’s dynamic weather system including atmospheric structure, composition, and processes; origin and development of storms and related phenomena. Lecture and laboratory required. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered alternate years, usually spring semester. Note: Students may enroll in either GEOS 115 or GEOS 116 - Meteorology , but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 116 - Meteorology


    (3 S.H.)

    Study of Earth’s dynamic weather system including atmospheric structure, composition, and processes; origin and development of storms and related phenomena. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered alternate years, usually spring semester. Note: Students may enroll in either  GEOS 115 - Meteorology with Laboratory  or GEOS 116, but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 120 - Dynamic Earth with Laboratory


    (4 S.H.)

    An introduction to geologic principles and the processes shaping planet Earth. Composition and distribution of Earth materials; examination of internal processes and their relationship to the distribution of continents over time; surficial processes and environmental problems. Lecture and laboratory. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered each semester. Note: Students may enroll in either GEOS 120 or GEOS 121 - Dynamic Earth , but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 121 - Dynamic Earth


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to geologic principles and the processes shaping planet Earth. Composition and distribution of earth materials; examination of internal processes and their relationship to the distribution of continents over time; surficial processes and environmental problems. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered each semester. Note: Students may enroll in either  GEOS 120 - Dynamic Earth with Laboratory  or GEOS 121, but they cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 145 - Paleontology and Dinosaurs


    (3 S.H.)

    Evolution, classification, extinction and geologic significance of major invertebrate and vertebrate groups. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered when demand warrants.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 146 - Paleontology and Dinosaurs with Laboratory


    (4 S.H.)

    Evolution, classification, extinction and geologic significance of dinosaurs and other major vertebrate and invertebrate groups. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered alternate years as demand warrants. Note: Students may enroll in either this course or GEOS 145 - Paleontology and Dinosaurs  but cannot earn credit for both courses.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 180 - Investigative Science I: Physical Science


    (4 S.H.)

    An integrated Physical Science experience through inquiry-based, hands-on exploration of Physics and Chemistry content. Emphasis on science education principles and connections to state and national science education standards. Lecture and laboratory combined. Field trips required. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered when demand warrants. Note: Students can enroll in either BIOL 180, CHEM 180, GEOS 180 or PHYS 180, but they cannot earn credit for more than one course.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 185 - Investigative Science II: Earth & Life Science


    (4 S.H.)

    An integrated Earth and Life Science experience through inquiry-based, hands-on exploration of Earth, Space and Life Science content. Emphasis on science education principles and connections to state and national science education standards. Lecture and laboratory combined. Field trip required. Meets GOAL 3. Prerequisite: BIOL 180 - Investigative Science I: Physical Science , CHEM 180 , GEOS 180 , or PHYS 180 . Grade only. Offered when demand warrants. Note: Students can enroll in either BIOL 185, CHEM 185, GEOS 185 or PHYS 185, but they cannot earn credit for more than one course.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 199 - Introductory Geoscience Laboratory


    (1 S.H.)

    This lab allows students to actively engage in solving geologic problems through hands-on activities and exercises. Examples include observation, testing, and identification of mineral and rock specimens, construction and interpretation of geologic and topographic maps to gain understanding of geologic processes such as plate tectonics, and building basic skills with new technologies important to the geosciences (such as GIS). During each lab, students record observations, analyze findings, and discuss results. Pre/corequisite: any GEOS course numbered 100-150. Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 215 - Earth System Science


    (4 S.H.)

    An introduction to the Earth System and its complexity. Inquiry-based exploration of the processes and relationships between the geosphere, hydrosphere, atmosphere, and biosphere. Introduction to Geology and Meteorology. Investigation of the various ways that humans interact with the Earth System. Integrated lecture and laboratory. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered fall semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 235 - Earth and Life Through Time


    (4 S.H.)

    Traces the physical, chemical, and biological evolution of the Earth from the origin of the solar system to the present including origin and evolution of Earth’s crust, interior, hydrosphere, and atmosphere; plate tectonics and mountain building; absolute age dating; paleomagnetism. Focuses on the assembly and evolution of North America as a model for global processes. Lecture and laboratory. Weekend field trip required. Meets GOAL 3. Prerequisites: GEOS 120 - Dynamic Earth with Laboratory , GEOS 215 - Earth System Science , or GEOS 199 - Introductory Geoscience Laboratory , and a 100 to 150-level GEOS course or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered spring semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 301 - Field and Analytical Methods I


    (4 S.H.)

    An introduction to basic geologic field techniques. Covered topics/techniques will include: field notes, rock descriptions and field sketches, use of a Brunton compass, pace and compass mapping, measurement and description of stratigraphic sections, surveying methods, mapping techniques and cross-section construction, GIS and remote sensing, and soil sampling and analysis. Field trips required. Prerequisites:   and  , or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered fall semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 305 - Minerals and Rocks


    (4 S.H.)

    Introduction to minerals as naturally occurring inorganic chemical compounds. Physical and chemical properties of minerals, classification and description of minerals, with emphasis on rock-forming minerals. Classification, description and interpretation of major rock groups. Lecture and laboratory. Field trips required. Prerequisites: CHEM 212 - Principles of Chemistry I  and GEOS 235 - Earth and Life Through Time  or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered fall semester.


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    GEOS 309 - Watershed Science


    (4 S.H.)

    Examination of the hydrologic cycle and surface-water and ground-water relationships. Study of interrelationship of water and Earth materials, including ground-water occurrence, movement and determination of aquifer characteristics. Lecture and laboratory. Field trips required. Prerequisite: Geoscience laboratory course from GOAL Area 3, or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered annually (usually fall semester).


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 316 - Geographic Information Systems


    (3 S.H.)

    Techniques of using aerial photographs, remote sensing, and GIS for geological applications. Prerequisite: Any natural science course or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered annually, usually spring semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 325 - Environmental Geoscience


    (3 S.H.)

    Study of the environmental implications of human interactions with natural geological systems. An emphasis is placed on understanding environmental science concepts and how scientific findings ultimately shape public policy and political decisions. Topics typically include climate change, water resources, alternative energy resources, soils and weathering, and coastal processes. Course is taught from an Earth systems perspective. Discussion-oriented lecture format. Meets GOAL 10. Prerequisite: Any natural science laboratory course or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered alternate years (usually spring semester).


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 335 - Global Climate Change


    (3 S.H.)

    Exploration of the Earth’s most recent glacial/interglacial cycles: geological and faunal evidence, the sequence of historical events, potential causative factors, environmental responses and rates of change, and pertinence to contemporary global change. An emphasis will be placed on understanding the mechanisms of climate change in relation to geological processes. Prerequisite: A 100/200-level geoscience course or the instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    GEOS 345 - Dinosaur Field Paleontology


    (4 S.H.)

    A field-based course that surveys the evolution, history, and paleobiology of dinosaurs and swimming and flying reptiles as well as introduces students to the techniques and practices of paleontological field- and labwork. Two weeks of fieldwork at active Late Cretaceous and Early Paleogene sites are supplemented by laboratory experience and classroom instruction. The course covers a broad range of topics, including principles of evolution, taxonomy, fossilization, geologic time, sedimentary rocks and sedimentary environments, dinosaur anatomy, paleoecology, field and laboratory techniques, and ethical and legal aspects of fossil excavation. Grade only. Offered summer session when demand warrants.


    Course Registration

  
  
  
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    △ GEOS 375 - Planetary Geology


    (4 S.H.)

    The study of solar system objects from the point of view of a geologist. Current understanding of geology on Earth is used to interpret the many other terrestrial bodies in our solar system. Examination of geologic processes throughout our solar system is used to more deeply understand the Earth’s evolution and geology. Topics covered include fundamentals of solar system objects, planetary formation and evolution, primary geologic processes throughout the solar system, remote sensing of planetary surfaces, and instrumentation and mission design methods used for solar system exploration. One day field trip required. Prerequisite: GEOS 235 - Earth and Life Through Time  or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ GEOS 385 - Geology of North America


    (3 S.H.)

    Study of the physiographic provinces of the North American continent with emphasis on geomorphology, structural history, stratigraphy and mineral deposits of each province. Lecture and discussion. Prerequisite: GEOS 305 - Minerals and Rocks . Grade or P/NC. Offered when demand warrants.


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    GEOS 399 - Internship


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Supervised governmental agency, business, industrial or research institution experience designed by Geoscience faculty advisor, work supervisor, and student. Prerequisites: Open only to Geoscience students with junior or senior standing, math/science GPA 2.5 or better, and approval by the Geoscience Department. Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    GEOS 401 - Geological Field-Research Methods


    (2-4 S.H.)

    A Field-based course that introduces students to a variety of mapping and field research techniques in locations of geologic interest appropriate for the specific focus of the course. The skills emphasized can include those specific to traditional geologic field mapping or more specialized research methods appropriate for geochemical, geophysical, paleontological, or surficial field research. In all cases the underlying skills of scientific observation, documentation, and hypothesis development will be practiced. Prerequisites: GEOS 325 - Environmental Geoscience , GEOS 301 - Field and Analytical Methods I , GEOS 305 - Minerals and Rocks , or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered summer session when demand warrants.


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    GEOS 405 - Current Topics in Geosciences


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Analysis of current topics and issues relevant to Geosciences. Subject matter and prerequisites will be announced in advance by the department. Grade only. Offered when demand warrants. Repeatable as topics change.


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    △ GEOS 415 - Advanced Geomorphology


    (4 S.H.)

    Study of the nature and evolution of land forms and materials at or near Earth’s surface. Analysis of land forms using topographic maps and aerial photographs. Soil-forming processes and soil classification. Lecture and laboratory. Field trips required. Prerequisites:   and   or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    ◎ GEOS 416 - Advanced Geographic Information Systems


    (4 S.H.)

    ​Advanced techniques in the use and application of geographic information systems, where students will learn to use GIS as a problem-solving tool and will explore many concepts introduced in GEOS 316 in greater depth and breadth. The course addresses spatial problem solving by focusing on both the conceptual and practical aspects of GIS modeling and spatial analysis. Topics covered will include advanced tools, data management, terrain analysis, spatial data analysis, visualization, modeling, and legal and ethical issues in GIS. Prerequisites: GEOS 316 - Geographic Information Systems  or instructor permission. Students must be familiar with GIS fundamentals and ESRI ArcGIS software. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    ◆ GEOS 420 - Applied Hydrogeology


    (4 S.H.)

    Application of hydrologic principles to ground-water flow problems, aqueous geochemistry, and contaminant studies. Techniques of water-well development, aquifer tests, determination of ground-water chemistry. Use of computer models and other analytical tools. Lecture and laboratory. Field trips required. Prerequisites: GEOS 309 - Watershed Science  and   or MATH 120 - Precalculus  or higher. Grade only. Offered spring semester alternate years.


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    GEOS 435 - Optical Mineralogy and Petrology


    (4 S.H.)

    Theory of optical mineralogy and use of the petrographic microscope. Optical properties of minerals and basics of microtextures. Introduction to igneous, and metamorphic petrology with a focus on description and classification of igneous and metamorphic rocks, leading to the petrogenetic and tectonic interpretation. Lecture and laboratory. Multi-day field trip required. Prerequisites: GEOS 305 - Minerals and Rocks  and CHEM 212 - Principles of Chemistry I . Grade only. Offered spring semester alternate years.


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    △ GEOS 441 - Paleontology and Paleoecology


    (4 S.H.)

    An introduction to paleontology and paleoecology. This course will examine the methods by which paleontologists use fossils to reconstruct the history of life on Earth, reliable date rocks, and study changes in ecology and climate. It combines traditional paleontology (taxonomy and anatomy of the major phyla of fossil organisms) with process-oriented paleontology (tempo and mode of evolution, functional morphology, paleoecology, paleopathology, etc.). In addition to examining and describing fossil organisms, students will learn to reconstruct how ancient organisms lived and interacted with their environment through lectures, discussions, and field and laboratory work. Field trips required. Prerequisite:   or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    ◆ GEOS 442 - Geophysics


    (4 S.H.)

    An overview of how geophysics is used to understand the Earth, covering both solid Earth geophysics and near surface geophysical techniques. Topics covered will include planetary formation, gravity, magnetism, energy flow, seismology, DC resistivity, electromagnetic methods, and ground penetrating radar. An emphasis is placed on developing a quantitative understanding of Earth processes through lecture, laboratory, and outdoor field work with near-surface geophysical equipment. Field trips required. Prerequisites: GEOS 235 - Earth and Life Through Time , and PHYS 201 - General Physics I  or PHYS 221 - University Physics I , or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    ◎ GEOS 443 - Global Water Resources


    (4 S.H.)

    An introduction to global water resources, focusing on the science, policy and management of fresh water resources. Topics include history of water resource issues, water quality, water treatment, water allocation law, water management agencies, water conflicts and solutions, water footprints, sustainability of global water resources, and the application of geospatial techniques/analysis to water resources management. Recommended prerequisite: GEOS 309 - Watershed Science  or GEOS 325 - Environmental Geoscience . Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    ◆ GEOS 445 - Geochemistry


    (4 S.H.)

    An introduction to geochemical processes. Topics covered will include fundamentals of geochemistry, environmental mineralogy, chemical fate and transport in the environment, remediation techniques, geochemical cycles, isotopes, and biogeochemical reactions. An emphasis is placed on developing a quantitative understanding of geochemical processes through lectures, discussions, and field and laboratory work. Field trips required. Prerequisites: CHEM 212 - Principles of Chemistry I  and GEOS 235 - Earth and Life Through Time , or instructor permission. CHEM 213 - Principles of Chemistry II  strongly recommended. Grade only. Offered spring semester alternate years.


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    △ GEOS 470 - Geological Research Strategies


    (2 S.H.)

    Instruction in building the skills necessary for designing, planning, and conducting geological research. Students will gain experience in background research using scientific literature, developing effective research proposals, utilizing relevant software, effective communication strategies, procedures for conducting quality field and laboratory research, data quality control and management, and writing and presenting research. Students will complete projects that incorporate and integrate the topics listed above. Some lecturing, but the course delivery style will emphasize peer review, discussion, and collaboration. Prerequisites: GEOS 235 - Earth and Life Through Time  and GEOS 301 - Field and Analytical Methods I . Grade only. Offered spring semester.


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    GEOS 475 - Geoscience Seminar


    (1 S.H.)

    Focused on aiding students in understanding the utility of their pending Geoscience degree and how to leverage themselves into career and graduate school opportunities after graduation. These goals will be achieved through assembling application materials and applying for a job or graduate school and preparing and giving oral presentations. Prerequisite: Senior standing in department or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered fall semester.


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    GEOS 499 - Directed Research-Geoscience


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Independent study of selected geologic field and/or laboratory problem with subsequent preparation of written report and oral seminar. Prerequisite: department chairperson permission. Grade only. Offered each semester. Repeatable up to six credits.


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German

  
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    GERM 101 - Elementary German I


    (4 S.H.)

    Introductory German for students with little or no prior German training. Instruction in speaking, listening, reading, and writing through classroom drill and language lab work. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    GERM 102 - Elementary German II


    (4 S.H.)

    Continuation of GERM 101. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Prerequisite: GERM 101 - Elementary German I  or two years of high school German or equivalent. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    GERM 201 - Intermediate German I


    (4 S.H.)

    Further development of communication skills. Study of grammar essential to skills. Selected readings in German. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Prerequisite: GERM 102 - Elementary German II  or equivalent of three years of high school German. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    GERM 202 - Intermediate German II


    (4 S.H.)

    Continuation of GERM 201. Further development of all the skills essential for communication. Further development of understanding written and spoken German. Practice in translation and practice in writing accentuated. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Prerequisite: GERM 201 - Intermediate German I  or equivalent of five years of middle school/high school German. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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Global Studies

  
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    GS 200 - Introduction to Global Studies


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to a framework for viewing the world as a unit and explores a variety of contemporary global issues such as economic development, environmental problems, status of women, world population and its implications, ethnic conflicts, etc. Meets GOAL 8 and GOAL 10. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester.


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    GS 202 - Cultural Diversity Laboratory


    (1-2 S.H.)

    The Diversity Lab is a 1- to 2-credit service learning course predicated on the notion that service learning is a means of integrating classroom theory with active learning in the world and a way to help others while gaining first-hand knowledge about another culture. Through structured service opportunities, students will discern how theoretical aspects of higher education can facilitate successful relations with minority communities in general and with Hmong and Latino preschoolers and their families in particular. Students will generate enriching literacy and school readiness activities for young children within their homes/communities and thereby link minority communities with the University community in a productive and collaborative manner. P/NC only.


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    GS 203 - Introduction to German Culture


    (4 S.H.)

    The evolution of German culture from its beginnings to the present, including analysis of historical, literary, and artistic movements. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered at least once annually. Note: Taught in English.


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    GS 204 - Special Topics: German Literature


    (4 S.H.)

    The course focuses on an individual author, a literary period/movement, or a special literary category/genre. Grade or P/NC. Note: Taught in English.


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    GS 205 - Cultural Encounters


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is conducted as a learning community. It seeks to bring together linguistically, ethnically, and culturally diverse students in an effort to achieve academic and social cross-fertilization of their backgrounds and academic concentrations and, thereby, promote cultural understanding and enrichment. Meets GOAL 7 & GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered alternate years.


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    GS 210 - Introduction to North America


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is an introduction to the physical, historical, social, political, literary, and cultural aspects of the three primary North American countries of Canada, the United States and Mexico with emphasis on the interrelationships among them and the human experience throughout them, especially that of peoples who have been marginalized in the past. Grade or P/NC.


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    GS 215 - Introduction to Japanese Culture


    (3-4 S.H.)

    This course explores Japanese culture and civilization from its prehistoric roots to the present. Beginning with physical conditions such as geography and climate, this course will examine how such realities have affected religious, historical, political, and regional social structures. From these, the course will proceed to cultural productions, including both “high” and “popular” culture. The goal of the course is not merely to show students how Japan is, but to encourage them to think about why Japan has emerged as it has during the past 2,500 years and to develop an informed perspective on where Japan and its people may be headed in the future. Meets GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC.


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    GS 218 - The New Europeans: Understanding the EU


    (3 S.H.)

    Through the use of stimulating readings, this course serves as an introduction to the issues shaping contemporary Europe. The main topic of the course will be to explore the evolution of the concept of Europe throughout different historical periods, learn about the different institutions that govern Europeans, highlight the important events in the unification of Europe, discuss the symbols that make Europe real for the average citizen, analyze the competing visions of where Europe is headed and what it should be, and explore the concept of the European dream and way of life by comparing it with its American counterpart. Meets GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    GS 220 - Special Topics: German Culture and Language


    (2 S.H.)

    This course deals with such topics as modern cultural developments in the German-speaking world, modern usage and themes in the German-language media, the development of the German language into its modern form, or the application of the German language to a specific professional field. Grade or P/NC. Note: Taught in English.


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    GS 222 - The Spanish Eye: The Contribution of Hispanic Masters to World Art


    (4 S.H.)

    This course has as its main purpose to serve as an introduction to the Spanish canonical masters in the fine arts of the 20th and 21st centuries. The purpose of this course is two-fold: 1) Through discussion of their work and its relevance in the construction of Hispanic identity, students will expand their knowledge of Hispanic culture and the aesthetic values that underpins it. 2) Through study in the disciplines such as literature, poetry, painting, music and architecture students will engage in critical analysis, form aesthetic judgments, and learn how individual creativity can also reflect both Hispanic culture and the human condition as a whole. As the title of the course suggests the idea is to present these artists as contributors to the tendencies in the world of fine arts through a particular point of view, one deeply rooted in the values of Hispanic culture. Meets GOAL 6 (humanities). Grade only. Offered annually (online).


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