Jul 05, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code, Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Legend:

◎ = Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

= Civic Engagement and Service Learning

 

Elementary and Early Childhood Education

  
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    EDUC 328 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts I


    (3 S.H.)

    The first of a two-course sequence in literacy methods examines the integration of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing competencies in a unified literacy curriculum for learners ages three to eight (Pre-Kindergarten - 3rd grade). Instructional emphasis is placed upon assessment, fluency, active construction of meaning, and matching learner capabilities with appropriate instructional strategies. Prerequisite: Admission to ELEC or ELEM program. Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    EDUC 329 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts II


    (3 S.H.)

    The second of a two-course sequence in literacy methods extends the examination of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing competencies by focusing on learners ages nine to fourteen (grades 4-8). Emphasis is placed upon strategies for expanding purposes and genres, integration of assessment and instruction, and teaching for self-regulation of comprehension, composing, and editing strategies. Lecture with field experience. Prerequisites: EDUC 328 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts I  and admission to ELEC or ELEM program. Corequisite: EDRD 450 - Differentiated Reading Instruction . Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    EDUC 333 - Teaching Social Studies in the Elementary School


    (3 S.H.)

    Course covers social studies curriculum for elementary grades. Development of teaching competencies in small group instruction, guiding student inquiry and conducting discovery lessons. Curriculum materials are studied and evaluated for use in the elementary classrooms. Field experience, micro-teaching, unit planning, and the use of children’s literature in the social studies curriculum are included in this course. Prerequisite: admitted to ELEC or ELEM program. Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    EDUC 335 - Teaching of Science and Environmental Studies in the Elementary School


    (3 S.H.)

    Study and guided application of current materials and methods designed for science and environmental education. Theoretical background and practical skills necessary for teaching both process and content curriculums are developed through individual and group work, as well as field experiences. Lecture with field experience. Prerequisites: Admission to ELEC or ELEM program and PHYS /BIOL /CHEM / GEOS 180 - Investigative Science I: Physical Science . Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    EDUC 406 - Teaching and Learning in American Culture


    (2 S.H.)

    This course is designed exclusively for incoming international students who participate in the Winona State University Cross Cultural Outreach Scholarship Program. Students will learn about cultural differences in local schools, on the university campus, and in the community. During the course, students will learn how to effectively deliver presentations about their cultures and global themes to various audiences in local schools, on the university campus, and to community groups. Students will acquire knowledge and skills related to effective use of presentation enhancements such as PowerPoint, presentation board, and question/answer sessions Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    EDUC 410 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education


    (3 S.H.)

    This course covers the foundations of early childhood education, as well as the community relationships and resources needed to support physical, social, emotional, language and cognitive development. Major theories and theorists are explored including: Comenius, Rousseau, Pestalozzi, Froebel, Montessori, Hall, Skinner, Dewey, Vygotsky, Bandura, Gardner, Malaguzzi. Contributors to the forward advance of developmentally appropriate practice are also studied including Katz, Paley, Bredekamp and others. Modern social policy and issues that affect the health and safety of children are also included in the course content. Lecture. Prerequisite: Admission to the ELEC program. Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    EDUC 413 - Development in Infancy


    (3 S.H.)

    Study in this course includes physical, social, emotional, cognitive and creative development in the first two years with an emphasis on care in-group settings.  Exposure to integrated curriculum, appropriate teaching strategies, inclusion and assessment. Intentional lesson planning aligned with Minnesota Indicators of Progress to achieve positive outcomes for young children will be emphasized. Evidenced-based methods in developing curriculum to enhance child health and well-being for infants and toddlers. A 30-hour of practicum experience with infants and toddlers in the WSU Child Development Center required. Lecture. Prerequisites: Admission to ELEC program and EDUC 410 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education . Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    △ EDUC 416 - Early Childhood/Kindergarten Curriculum


    (4 S.H. )

    This course covers physical, social, emotional, language and cognitive development of children ages 3-6, in learning environments and the community relationships needed to support this development. Lecture with practicum. Field experience of 30 hours in an approved preschool or kindergarten classroom required. Prerequisites: Admitted to ELEC program and EDUC 410 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education . Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    EDUC 490 - Individual Problems in Education


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Opportunity for the qualified advanced undergraduate and graduate student to work independently. Topics may include research, development of special projects, selected readings, etc. Time-arranged. Prerequisites: major advisor permission, completion of the Professional Sequence, and for elementary majors, completion of the Professional Education Sequence. P/NC only. Offered each semester. Note: P/NC applicable to undergraduate only. Repeatable up to four credits.


    Course Registration

  
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    EDUC 498 - Workshops and Seminar


    (1-3 S.H.)

    The subject matter will be developed by the department and instructor prior to the workshop or seminar. P/NC only. Offered when demand warrants. Repeatable as topics change.


    Course Registration

  
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    EDUC 499 - Workshops and Seminar


    (1-3 S.H.)

    The subject matter will be developed by the department and instructor prior to the workshop or seminar. Grade only. Offered when demand warrants. Repeatable as topics change.


    Course Registration


English

  
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    ENG 099 - Introduction to College Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    Students undertake intensive writing practice with special focus on the fundamentals of sentence and paragraph structure. The course aims to prepare students for ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Students who do not pass this course will not be permitted to take ENG 111. (Credits do not count toward graduation.) Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 105 - ESL: Listening to Academic Speech


    (3 S.H.)

    Intensive practice in understanding academic lectures. Attention is also paid to pronunciation and other oral language skills. Designed to help ESL learners function successfully in American university classrooms. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 106 - ESL: Academic Reading and Writing I


    (3 S.H.)

    Intensive practice in academic English with special attention to reading comprehension, including vocabulary, grammar, and basic writing skills. Designed to prepare non-native speakers for more advanced English courses and help them become successful in other academic disciplines. Must be followed by ENG 107 - ESL: Academic Reading and Writing II . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing


    (4 S.H.)

    This course aims to strengthen students’ reading and writing abilities in preparation for college-level writing. A means of learning and inquiry, the writing in this course is based on interpreting, analyzing, and critiquing texts as well as on conducting research, synthesizing sources, and using citation/documentation formats.  Meets GOAL 1. Prerequisite: Qualifying ACT English sub-score, minimum score on the English placement exam, or successful completion of ENG 099 - Introduction to College Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 112 - Research Writing


    (1 S.H.)

    Course focuses on researching and composing a documented argumentative essay. For students transferring an appropriate 3 S.H. composition course in order to meet the requirement usually fulfilled by ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Meets GOAL 1 with transfer English course. Prerequisite: Department Chairperson’s permission required. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 120 - Introduction to Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    Intensive reading in selected major forms and themes of literature. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s content.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 210 - Advanced Expository Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    An advanced course in writing expository essays for academic audiences, this course emphasizes the development of a mature prose style and a sophisticated approach to textual interpretation. Students refine their rhetorical and grammatical/mechanical competence and strengthen their skills in academic research, source integration, critical analysis, and evaluative judgment. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 211 - Writing in Communities


    (3 S.H.)

    This course concerns the study and practice of writing as a means of participation in a diverse, democratic, and literate society. Students may work with community partners to define and complete writing projects. Meets GOAL 9. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 219 - Gender and Sexual Identity in American Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    This course focuses on representations of gender and/or sexual identity in American literature and culture. The course will explore historical and social contexts for the construction of gender and/or sexual identity, as well as how it intersects with other factors of identity. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 7. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 220 - Multicultural American Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    Recognizing the rich array of cultures that have contributed to American history, life, and art, this course focuses on one such culture or on a cross-cultural topic and offers students a study of vital literary voices and their social contexts. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 7. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 221 - Topics in World Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    Furnishing students with an opportunity to read artful writing of cultures other than those of the United States and England, this course focuses on a selected theme, genre, period, language, nationality, or region. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 222 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to writing poetry, fiction, and other creative genres (may include drama, screenwriting, or creative nonfiction). Covers basics of genre, style, and voice. Meets GOAL 6 (Fine Arts). Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 223 - Classical Mythology


    (3 S.H.)

    This course covers the principal characters, narratives, and genres of Greek and Roman “mythologies.” Studying this ancient literature and its contexts, students acquire knowledge of the Classical tradition and its influences in literary history. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 224 - The Bible as Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    The literary structure and genres of the Hebrew and Christian scriptures with special attention to the cultures that created them and major translations. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 225 - Topics in Literature


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Intensive study of a selected topic in English and foreign literature in translation. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 226 - Topics in Writing


    (1-4 S.H.)

    This course enables inquiry into and practice with specialized kinds of writing such as journal writing, web writing, and review writing. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 227 - Topics in Language


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Study of a topic of current importance in linguistics such as language variation, world English, language and culture, language and gender, or any other area of language in society. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each semester’s subject and credit. Grade only. Repeatable up to nine credits.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 230 - Literature and the Environment


    (3 S.H.)

    This course surveys literary texts exploring the relationship between humankind and the environment. Possible topics include eco-criticism, sustainability, environmental concerns, and the importance of the natural world in the literary imagination. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered twice annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 240 - Teaching Young Adult Literature (Grades 5-12)


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of young adult literature and its application in middle and secondary school curricula. Students will create and share teaching materials, such as lesson plans, study guides, writing assignments, and exams. ENG 240 addresses state licensure requirements for some levels of teaching communication arts and literature. Prerequisite: Instructor permission. Grade only. Offered annually (usually spring semester).


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 250 - English Grammar and Usage


    (2 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts and elements of English grammar and usage. The primary purpose is to develop students’ abilities to understand grammar from a formal perspective. This course prepares students for ENG 328 - English Syntax . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies


    (3 S.H.)

    An introductory course in literary analysis, focusing on the major genres and introducing literary history, methods of interpretation, and research and documentation. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 291 - History of Literature in English


    (3 S.H.)

    This course explores the historical arc of nearly 1,500 years of literature in English, considering especially innovations and continuities in language, culture, aesthetics, and technologies. Students will read exemplary works from various literary periods, movements, and locations, representing an assortment of genres and forms, in order to locate those works in history and discover the transhistorical connections among them. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 292 - History of the English Language


    (3 S.H.)

    This course explores the development of English, a living and changing language that is over 1,500 years old, from its Indo-European roots through Old English, Middle English, Early Modern English, and Present Day English. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 308 - Playwriting/Scriptwriting


    (3 S.H.)

    Study and practice in the techniques and forms of playwriting for the stage and scriptwriting for the camera; reading and writing a variety of short plays and screenplays. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 309 - Nonfiction Prose Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    Study and practice in the techniques and forms of nonfiction prose; reading and writing a variety of essay and nonfiction prose genres. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
  
  
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    ENG 323 - Multimodal Composition and Literacies


    (3 S.H.)

    This course focuses on how authors employ different media sources to communicate ideas and information to diverse audiences. It explores the ethical implications behind and embedded ideologies within varying media texts, as well as the creation, distribution, and consumption of media. Through a series of multimodal activities and projects, students will analyze the continually evolving relationships between media producers and consumers in the digital age. Meets GOAL 9. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 324 - Projects in Writing and Language


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Special projects in writing, publishing, and/or language, including such work as tutoring writing, teaching English as a Second Language, editing literary publications, or other similar undertakings. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 328 - English Syntax


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the structure of English as described by modern linguists. The course aims to develop students’ ability to analyze and describe English and to apply syntactic knowledge of English to stylistic analyses of texts. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an introduction to the study of language from a linguistic standpoint. Topics include phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language acquisition, and language and culture. This introduction to linguistics prepares students for further studies in the field. Meets GOAL 5. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 361 - Literature In English to 1642: Authors


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific author or authors of literature in English from the beginning of the language to 1642. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 362 - Literature in English to 1642: Genres


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific genre of literature in English to 1642. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 363 - Literature in English to 1642: Topics


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific topic in literature in English to 1642. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 364 - Literature in English 1642-1832: Authors


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific author or authors in literature in English from 1642-1832. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 365 - Literature in English 1642-1832: Genres


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific genre in literature in English from 1642-1832. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 366 - Literature in English 1642-1832: Topics


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific topic in literature in English from 1642-1832. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 367 - Literature in English 1832-Present: Authors


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific author or authors in literature in English from 1832 to the present. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 368 - Literature in English 1832-Present: Genres


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific genre in literature in English from 1832 to the present. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 369 - Literature in English 1832 - Present: Topics


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies of a specific topic in literature in English from 1832 to the present. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    △ ENG 390 - Literary Criticism: Theory and Practice


    (3 S.H.)

    Following students’ introduction to literary-critical methodologies in ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies  and coinciding with students’ exercise of those approaches in various upper-division classes, this course covers-through readings in and about 20th century literary theory and criticism-major figures, ideas, and movements from New Criticism to the present. In this reading- and writing-intensive course, students produce papers that, from defined critical perspectives, interpret literary works by applying theoretical paradigms. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 399 - Internship


    (1-12 S.H.)

    Supervised, practical experience in a wide variety of fields. Must be arranged well in advance of the registration period. P/NC only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ ENG 402 - Teaching English in Middle School and Secondary School


    (4 S.H.)

    A study of the goals and methods of the middle school and secondary English teacher and the content and structure of the middle school and secondary English curriculum. ENG 402 addresses state licensure requirements for some levels of teaching communication arts and literature. This course should be taken after completing as much of the Professional Education sequence as possible. Prerequisites: B grade or higher in ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies  and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ ENG 404 - Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction


    (3 S.H.)

    Advanced practice in writing and revising creative nonfiction, with an emphasis on the development of the student’s individual style. Variable content depends on the discretion of the instructor. Examples of other topics may include nature writing, the spiritual memoir, and travel writing. Prerequisite: ENG 309 - Nonfiction Prose Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ ENG 410 - Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction


    (3 S.H.)

    Opportunity to produce a significant body of new fiction and develop a literary aesthetic and philosophy. Application of various expressive, imitative, and experimental writing techniques. Prerequisite: ENG 310 - Story Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
  
  
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    ENG 423 - Shakespeare in Performance


    (3 S.H.)

    This intensive two-week course is based on careful reading and discussion of Shakespeare’s plays and their performances; the choice of plays for the course will correspond to the offerings of the Great River Shakespeare Festival. This course entails extra fees. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    △ ENG 432 - Literature in a Global Context


    (3 S.H.)

    Examination of texts within their cultural contexts and exploration of strategies for comparing texts from various cultural traditions. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    △ ENG 433 - American Diversities


    (3 S.H.)

    This variable-topics course offers in-depth study of the literature from one traditionally underrepresented group or groups in the US and/or the Americas. Semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    △ ENG 439 - Technical Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    The theory and practice of creating technical documents with text and graphics such as proposals, reviews, reports, newsletters, descriptions, instructions, manuals, websites, and/or correspondence. Using available technology (hardware and software), students will develop these documents with attention to their personal, organizational, cultural, legal, and ethical consequences. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◆ ENG 440 - Professional Editing


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the principles of editing for publication. Course topics may include the editing of business, governmental, non-profit, and/or literary writing. Course topics may also include developmental editing, copy editing, and editing in digital and print formats. Through a series of projects, students will analyze and revise a variety of genres and mediums to the standards of professional editing. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    ENG 461 - Independent Studies


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Independent studies determined by the needs of the individual student. Offered by previous arrangement only. A student may earn no more than 6 S.H. through independent studies. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies . Grade or P/NC.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ ENG 470 - Seminar in American Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    This reading- and writing-intensive course offers advanced study of a period, genre, figure, or theme in American literature and includes seminar-style presentations by students. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisites: △ ENG 390 - Literary Criticism: Theory and Practice . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ ENG 471 - Seminar in British Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    This reading- and writing-intensive course offers advanced study of a period, genre, figure, or theme in British literature and includes seminar-style presentations by students. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisites: △ ENG 390 - Literary Criticism: Theory and Practice  . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    △ ENG 472 - Seminar in Language and Discourse


    (3 S.H.)

    This course offers advanced study of a specific topic within language and discourse. Possible topics include language and social context, language and culture, rhetorical theory, classical rhetoric, and others. Variable content: semester schedule announces each section’s focus. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade or P/NC. Offered every third semester. Repeatable as topics change.


    Course Registration

  
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    △ ENG 480 - Theories of Second Language Acquisition


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to core issues in second language acquisition and research. Students work to understand what is occurring linguistically, cognitively, and socially as humans learn languages beyond their native language. The course focuses on both theoretical and pragmatic interactions among learner, language, and context. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ ENG 481 - TESOL Theory and Methods


    (3 S.H.)

    The course examines theories, methods, and techniques of teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), including psychological, socio-cultural, political, and pedagogical factors affecting learning and teaching and the influence of these factors on current teaching practice. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    ◆ ENG 483 - Pedagogical Grammar


    (3 S.H.)

    In this course, students examine the structural features of English as they apply to the teaching and learning of English as a second or foreign language. The primary focus is on explaining grammatical concepts within pedagogical contexts. Prior experience in the formal study of English grammar is necessary background for this course. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 328 - English Syntax  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 484 - ESL Materials, Resources, and Assessment


    (3 S.H.)

    The major focus of this course is the examination of theories and principles guiding successful ESL material development and language test creation. Students typically practice developing their own course materials, evaluate their suitability in a sample lesson, and prepare tests for a variety of student levels. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ENG 490 - Portfolio


    (1 S.H.)

    Students compile portfolio materials including a vita, a critical introduction, and selected papers and projects from their former coursework. Required of all English majors as a capstone project in the senior year. Grade only.


    Course Registration


Entrepreneurship & Innovation

  
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    ENTI 373 - Entrepreneurship


    (3 S.H.)

    Provides an overview of the process of entrepreneurship focusing on new venture development. The three core areas are business idea identification, opportunity evaluation and opportunity exploitation. Topics of start-up activities consist of personal assessment, idea generation, opportunity recognition and identification, market assessment, feasibility determination, financial planning, legal, human resources, and business planning. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business and junior standing. Prerequisites for all other majors and minors: Junior standing and instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered annually (usually spring semester).


    Course Registration


Ethnic Studies

  
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    ETHN 168 - Introduction to Ethnic Studies


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the field of Ethnic Studies. The goal of the course is to introduce students to the content of Ethnic Studies and to assist students in developing critical skills as thinkers, readers and writers within the field of Ethnic Studies. Meets GOAL 7. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    ETHN 260 - Special Topics in Ethnic Studies


    (3 S.H.)

    Study of a selected topic in Ethnic Studies. Variable content: semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit. Grade only. Offered at department discretion. Repeatable as topics change.


    Course Registration

  
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    ETHN 268 - Race, Ethnicity, and Representation in the United States


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will focus on the historical and contemporary popular culture representations of race in the United States. In particular, we will examine stereotypes, archetypes, and caricatures of People of Color in the U.S., in order to better understand the historical roots of these images as well as their pervasiveness in contemporary representation. We will also examine the impact of these representations, discussing how stereotypes and archetypes both shape and reflect structural inequalities such as those found in public policy, housing, education, and other institutions. This course begins by examining the various definitions of “popular,” “culture,” and “popular culture” and moves through racialized representations from the 19th century to the present. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 9. Prerequisite: ETHN 168 - Introduction to Ethnic Studies  or instructor permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    ETHN 360 - Special Topics in Ethnic Studies


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Intensive study of a selected topic in Ethnic Studies. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit. Prerequisite: ETHN 168 - Introduction to Ethnic Studies  or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered occasionally. Repeatable as topics change.


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    ETHN 368 - Ethnic Studies Seminar 1: History, Theory, and Methods


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is an introduction to the history, theory, and methods used to conduct research in the interdisciplinary field of Ethnic Studies, and serves as the first half of the research capstone required for completion of the Ethnic Studies minor. Students will learn the ideological underpinnings of the field, and the research methods commonly used in Ethnic Studies. Students will complete this course by drafting a formal research project proposal to be undertaken in ETHN 468 - Ethnic Studies Seminar 2: Social Justice Research . Prerequisite: ETHN 168 - Introduction to Ethnic Studies . Grade only. Offered annually (usually fall semester).


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    ETHN 468 - Ethnic Studies Seminar 2: Social Justice Research


    (3 S.H.)

    In this seminar course, students will undertake a scaffolded research project based on the theoretical frames and research methods covered in ETHN 368. Students will first revise their research proposal centering on race and/or ethnicity in the United States. The remainder of the course will be devoted to the research, writing, and presentation process, resulting in a 20-25 page research paper and conference-style paper presentation. The course will focus on: the process of undertaking a research project, including how to find, evaluate, and understand primary and secondary source material; the ethics of working with underserved communities; the political projects of research; the failures, successes, and reconfiguration of research projects; and the means of disseminating research, including conferences and journal/book contributions. Prerequisite: ETHN 368 - Ethnic Studies Seminar 1: History, Theory, and Methods . Grade only. Offered annually.


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Film

  
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    FILM 140 - Approaches to Film


    (3 S.H.)

    A general introduction to the art of the film, the course addresses elements of narrative, composition, design, cinematography, acting, directing, editing, theory, and criticism.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only.


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    FILM 221 - World Cinema


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to world cinema, with a focus on the history of film as an art form and its impact on society, politics, and culture. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    FILM 240 - Film Genres


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies in a specific genre, such as the Western, screwball comedy, horror, war, melodrama, or noir film, with the individual topic(s) announced in the course schedule. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Repeatable as topics change.


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    FILM 250 - Introductory Filmmaking


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to filmmaking technique and practice, focusing on the collaborative production of short films for public distribution and exhibition. The specific topic and project will be announced in the class schedule. Prerequisite: FILM 140 - Approaches to Film  or FILM 240 - Film Genres . Grade only. Offered when demand warrants. Repeatable up to six credits.


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    FILM 399 - Internship


    (1-12 S.H.)

    Supervised, practical experience in film research, analysis, criticism, production, distribution, promotion, or exhibition. Must be arranged well in advance of the registration period. A student may apply no more than 6 S.H. of internship credits towards the Film Studies minor. Prerequisites: Requires instructor’s permission. P/NC only.


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    ◆ FILM 450 - Topics/Problems


    (3 S.H.)

    Advanced studies of a specific topic or problem in film and media studies, such as those concerning technology, authorship, adaptation, intertextuality, interpretation, hermeneutics, etc. with the individual topic(s) announced in the course schedule. Weekly screenings and substantial research required. Prerequisites: FILM 140 - Approaches to Film , FILM 240 - Film Genres , or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered annually. Repeatable as topics change.


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    FILM 461 - Independent Studies


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Independent studies in film determined by the needs of the individual student. A student may not earn more than 6 S.H. through independent studies in film. Prerequisite: instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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Finance

  
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    FIN 100 - Financial Literacy


    (3 S.H.)

    Most people are unable to understand economic and financial issues in their political, social and personal lives. This course will prepare you to make intelligent decisions in both the public and private spheres. We will focus on such practical issues as what are the implications of economic policies, how does finance work, and what goes on in financial markets. This is a general course intended for all students and no business background is assumed; it does not cover issues in personal finance. Meets GOAL 9. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester.


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    FIN 360 - Corporate Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    The theory and practice of corporate finance, using the approaches and quantitative methods required of today’s financial managers and decision-makers. Special emphasis on a theory of value, the determinants of risk, return and the opportunity cost of capital, applied to both real and financial assets, the study of leverage issues, the exploitation of market inefficiencies, and the development of various tools and economic reasoning which provide the basis for a wide range of corporate financial decisions. Prerequisites: Admission to College of Business or Data Science majors, ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics , and ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics . Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    ◆ FIN 377 - Investments


    (3 S.H.)

    Investment policies affecting the individual and institutional investor. Includes the analysis and management of stocks, bonds, mutual funds and other investments, and the nature of security markets.

      Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.


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