Sep 28, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code, Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Legend:

◎ = Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

= Civic Engagement and Service Learning

 

Business Administration

  
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    BUSA 321 - Applied Business Ethics


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines ethics within the corporate environment and provides students with a conceptual framework with which to analyze and make ethical decisions. Topics addressed in this course include, but are not limited to, stakeholder relationships, social responsibility, corporate governance, organizational relationships, ethical business cultures, corporate ethics programs and business ethics in the global economy. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business and junior standing. Prerequisites for all other majors and minors: Junior standing and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    BUSA 326 - Business and the Future


    (3 S.H.)

    This course offers a broad understanding of some salient global trends and their implications for the future of business. The course covers a variety of topics such as the new global economy, the new culture of capitalism, the future of nation states and multinationals, the global demographic trends, innovation and technological change, challenges to governance and security, the climate change and identity crisis. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business. Prerequisites for all other majors and minors: Junior standing and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    BUSA 331 - Internet Law


    (3 S.H.)

    An overview and discussion of the current state of the law with respect to computers and internet technology. Legal topics are analyzed to determine the implications for individuals and business. Consideration is given to the societal effects of these legal trends. Prerequisites for College of Business: BUSA 291 - Legal Environment of Business . Prerequisites for all other majors: Junior standing, BUSA 291 - Legal Environment of Business  and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    BUSA 351 - Employment Law


    (3 S.H.)

    An in-depth analysis of statutes and cases that regulate the employment setting. Topics include wrongful termination, privacy in the workplace, discrimination under Title VII, other statutory protections against discrimination, occupational safety and health requirements, minimum wages and overtime, and employee welfare programs such as social security and worker’s compensation. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business, and BUSA 291 - Legal Environment of Business . Prerequisites for all other major and minors: Junior standing, BUSA 291 - Legal Environment of Business , and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    BUSA 353 - Business Innovation


    (3 S.H.)

    An investigation into current methodologies and practices using technological innovation to develop new businesses and to modify current organizations. An iterative approach to the combination of technical and human resources to provide value to customers will be used to analyze potential business models. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business and junior standing. Prerequisites for all other majors and minors: Junior standing and instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered annually.


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    BUSA 376 - Topics in Business


    (1-3 S.H.)

    An analysis of current topics and issues relevant to the milieu of business. The subject matter to be offered each semester is announced in advance by the department. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: admission to the College of Business and junior standing. Prerequisites for all other majors and minors: junior standing and instructor permission. Grade only. Repeatable as topics change.


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    BUSA 377 - Travel Study


    (3-6 S.H.)

    This course is a travel study designed to increase students’ knowledge of the international business environment. Prerequisite: admission to College of Business or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered as required.


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    BUSA 398 - Internship


    (1-9 S.H.)

    Credits will not be counted in the Business Administration major, but as general elective credits. Prerequisites: admission to the College of Business and junior standing. Corequisite: BUSA 399 - Internship Project . P/NC only.


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    BUSA 401 - Insurance Law


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the sources of insurance law. Analysis of the contractual relationships as to the scope of the obligations of the parties, risks covered, performance and termination. Areas of insurance included are casualty liability, life, property, auto and group insurance among others. Prerequisite: BUSA 301 - Business Law I . Grade only.


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    BUSA 421 - Consumer Law


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the major issues affecting consumers. Included are sales practices, warranties, advertising, credit extension, rates and disclosure requirements, collections, remedies, and housing. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business, and  . Prerequisites for all other majors and minors: Junior standing, instructor’s permission, and BUSA 291 - Legal Environment of Business . Grade only.


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    BUSA 441 - Health Care Law and Ethics


    (2 S.H.)

    Health care is a dynamic multi-national profession governed by increasingly complex laws. While heavily regulated, health care provides many business and entrepreneurial opportunities within the growing industry. Health Care Law and Ethics provides an overview of legal, regulatory, and ethical issues within the health care system. This course will provide an overview of tort liability as it relates to the medical field; respect for personhood in the professional-patient relationship; privacy issues based on advances in technology with a special emphasis on legal aspects of HIPAA, EHRs and PHRs; and patient rights. Prerequisites:  , Admission to the College of Business, or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered every three years as part of the HLC program.


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    BUSA 486 - Independent Studies in Business


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Offers the advanced student an opportunity to do additional reading and/or research in areas of special interest. Total credits may not exceed 6 S.H. Prerequisites for College of Business majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business. Prerequisites for non-College of Business majors and minors:  Junior standing and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    BUSA 491 - Independent Studies in Business


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Offers the advanced student an opportunity to do additional reading and/or research in areas of special interest. Total credits may not exceed 6 S.H. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business. Prerequisites for all other majors and minors: Junior standing and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    BUSA 491 - Seminar in Business Law


    (3 S.H.)

    An advanced analysis of current legal issues. Focus of the course to be determined by the instructor and announced in class schedule. Prerequisites for College of Business BS majors and minors: Admission to the College of Business. Prerequisites for all other majors and minors: Junior standing and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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Business Education

  
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    BUED 215 - Personal Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will provide a broad overview of consumer finance topics at an introductory level. Specifically, the units will address budgeting, tax planning, banking, consumer credit, insurance, investments, retirement, and estate planning. This course is designed to prepare pre-service teachers to become teachers of basic finance at the high school level. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester.


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    BUED 218 - Job Search Strategies: Resumé


    (1 S.H.)

    An examination of job search strategies with emphasis on the written and oral communications necessary to market one’s potential. Special focus on developing a competitive resumé, Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    BUED 219 - Job Search Strategies: Application Letter and Interview


    (1 S.H.)

    An examination of job search strategies with emphasis on the written and oral communications necessary to market one’s potential. Special focus is placed on developing effective application correspondence, follow-up correspondence, and interviewing techniques. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester.


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    BUED 320 - Software Applications


    (3 S.H.)

    Software applications commonly used in business education and training environments including word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, and desktop publishing. Students will work on various hands-on projects to enhance end-user abilities at an intermediate level. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 330 - Advanced Software Applications


    (3 S.H.)

    Software applications commonly used in business education and training environments including word processing, spreadsheet, database, presentation, and web design tools. Students will work on various hands-on projects to enhance end-user abilities at an advanced level. Prerequisites: BUED 320 - Software Applications . Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 333 - Business Communication


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will address a broad range of topics pertaining to interpersonal communication, management communication, and intercultural communication. Includes the study and application of effective design strategies related to business writing, professional presentations, and social media. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 340 - Technology Concepts and Applications


    (3 S.H.)

    Components of computer hardware, software, operating systems, input, output, networking, security, privacy, and web tools will be addressed. Emphasis will also be placed on current technology trends and applications relevant in the business education and training professions. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 350 - Quality of Work Life


    (3 S.H.)

    Focuses on a quality of work life approach to diversity in the workplace including gender, cultural, age, social, racial, and ethnic differences. Examines professional and interpersonal dynamics within organizational cultures, human resource values and politics. Includes leadership styles and career enhancement strategies. An experiential approach to attitudinal and professional development. Grade or P/NC. Offered alternate years.


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    BUED 360 - Interpersonal Business Relations


    (3 S.H.)

    Confronting and coping with interpersonal problems specific to the business environment. Focus is on strategies for managing productive work relationships. Includes leadership styles, power and authority, listening and feedback skills, conflict resolution, relating to minority groups, and multicultural business relationships. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 401 - General Business Teaching Methods


    (3 S.H.)

    This methods course focuses on the teaching of marketing, entrepreneurship, basic business, and personal finance. Other topics include teaching foundations, learning theories, lesson planning, curriculum trends, instructional and motivational strategies, assessment, student organizations, career and technical education, and professional development opportunities in the field. Open only to Business Education majors. Recommended prerequisites: Admitted to the College of Education. Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    BUED 403 - Technology and Accounting Teaching Methods


    (3 S.H.)

    This methods course focuses on the teaching of technology, keyboarding, and accounting. Other topics include lesson planning, classroom management, learning styles, assessment, effective teaching strategies, curriculum trends and resources. Open to Business Education majors. Prerequisites: Admitted to the Teacher Education Unit. Grade only. Offered annually.


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    BUED 410 - Training & Leadership Relations


    (3 S.H.)

    Leadership topics will be addressed including effective leadership strategies, risk taking, engaging and strengthening others, clarifying values, and celebrating success. Related communication topics will also be addressed including fostering collaboration, strategic and organizational communication, envisioning and communicating goals. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 435 - Personnel Management/Career Development


    (3 S.H.)

    The study of effective management including managing a new and diverse workforce; safety, health, well-being, security topics; enhancing performance; and motivation at work. Human resource topics will also be addressed including compensation and benefits, recruiting, selecting, training/developing employees; employment law, performance appraisals; career development and transition skills. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 440 - Training and Development Theory


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will provide an overview of training and adult learning theory with an emphasis on a systems approach to training program design. Key phases of the training and development process will be addressed including needs analysis, design, implementation, and evaluation. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 441 - Training Design & Application


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will focus on design principles and application methods used to develop effective training sessions. Related topics will include research-based training principles, instructional methods, and current trends in the training and development field. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    BUED 470 - Seminar in Training and Education


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Specific subject matter is arranged by the BUED faculty. Grade or P/NC. Offered when demand warrants. Repeatable as topics change.


    Course Registration

  
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    BUED 490 - Capstone Seminar


    (1 S.H.)

    A synthesis of major course work and internship experiences for seniors in BUED programs. A comprehensive analysis and compilation of students’ learning outcomes; a culminating experience and evaluation of indicators that demonstrate students’ success in achieving program learning outcome goals. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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Chemistry

  
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    CHEM 100 - How Things Work: The World through a Chemical Lens


    (3 S.H.)

    Chemistry is everywhere in our world. From agriculture to alternative energy to advances in medicine, chemistry is a way to bring about real, global change. Today’s informed citizens and consumers can benefit greatly from a working knowledge of basic chemical concepts. These concepts are presented as lecture-demonstrations and interactive activities for students who wish to gain greater insight into how things work in the chemical world. Meets General Education Program MnTC requirements; not intended as preparation for other chemistry courses. Does not preclude taking any other chemistry courses for credit. Includes chemical demonstrations and use of the scientific method, including data collection and analysis. Not open to students who have earned credit in  . Meets GOAL 3 and GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester.


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    CHEM 106 - Chemistry in Our World


    (3 S.H.)

    Intended to introduce students to chemistry and give them an appreciation and understanding of the role chemistry plays in their everyday lives. Topics covered include atomic structure, bonding, water, acid rain, and energy. This course is intended for General Education Program-MnTC requirements. It is a first course for students who have not had high school chemistry and wish to prepare to take other chemistry classes. Students may elect to take the course with lab ( CHEM 107 - Chemistry in Our World with Lab ) which includes chemical demonstrations and use of the scientific method, including data collection and analysis. Meets GOAL 3 and GOAL 10. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester. Note: Students may enroll in either CHEM 106 or CHEM 107 - Chemistry in Our World with Lab , but they cannot earn credit for both courses. Not open to students who have earned credit in CHEM 212 - Principles of Chemistry I .


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    CHEM 107 - Chemistry in Our World with Lab


    (4 S.H.)

    Intended to introduce students to chemistry and give them an appreciation and understanding of the role chemistry plays in their everyday lives. Topics covered include atomic structure, bonding, water, acid rain, and energy. This course is intended as a first course for students who have not had high school chemistry and wish to prepare to take other chemistry classes. Students may elect to take this course with lab or without lab ( CHEM 106 - Chemistry in Our World ). Meets GOALS 3 and 10. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester. Note: Students may enroll in either CHEM 106 - Chemistry in Our World  or CHEM 107, but they cannot earn credit for both courses. Not open to students who have earned credit in CHEM 212 - Principles of Chemistry I .


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    CHEM 180 - Investigative Science I: Physical Science


    (4 S.H.)

    An integrated Physical Science experience through inquiry-based, hands-on exploration of Physics and Chemistry content. Emphasis on science education principles and connections to state and national science education standards. Lecture and laboratory combined. Field trips required. Meets GOAL 3. Grade only. Offered when demand warrants. Note: Students can enroll in either BIOL 180, CHEM 180, GEOS 180 or PHYS 180, but they cannot earn credit for more than one course.


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    CHEM 185 - Investigative Science II: Earth & Life Science


    (4 S.H.)

    An integrated Earth and Life Science experience through inquiry-based, hands-on exploration of Earth, Space and Life Science content. Emphasis on science education principles and connections to state and national science education standards. Lecture and laboratory combined. Field trip required. Meets GOAL 3. Prerequisite: BIOL 180 - Investigative Science I: Physical Science , CHEM 180 , GEOS 180 , or PHYS 180 . Grade only. Offered when demand warrants. Note: Students can enroll in either BIOL 185, CHEM 185, GEOS 185 or PHYS 185, but they cannot earn credit for more than one course.


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    CHEM 190 - Forensic Chemistry


    (4 S.H.)

    This interdisciplinary course in forensic science meets the needs of criminal justice majors as well as students who desire a course that offers a broad scientific experience. This course will offer non-science majors opportunities to see the relevance of chemistry, biology, geology, and physics to their chosen professional life. It will provide an informative overview of techniques used by modern criminalistics labs and offer students a hands-on opportunity to explore the intricacies of how criminal investigation relies on forensic science. Through this course, students will gain an appreciation of how local law enforcement agencies rely on scientific studies for technical field work. Meets GOAL 3 and GOAL 9. Grade only. Offered annually.


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    CHEM 210 - General, Organic, and Biochemistry


    (5 S.H.)

    A study of the principles of general, organic, and biological chemistry with emphasis on the numerous connections between chemistry and human health. Four lectures and one laboratory period per week. Meets GOAL 3. Prerequisites: High school chemistry or CHEM 107 - Chemistry in Our World with Lab  and MATH 100 - Mathematics for Sustainability  or qualifying score on mathematics placement exam. Grade only. Offered fall and spring semesters.


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    CHEM 212 - Principles of Chemistry I


    (4 S.H.)

    An in-depth study of the principles of chemistry including atomic structure, the chemical bond, solutions, thermodynamics, kinetics, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction, complex ion equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Organic and inorganic examples are used when appropriate throughout the courses, and a short unit on organic chemistry is included. Laboratory and lecture are coordinated. Meets GOAL 3. Prerequisites: High school intermediate algebra, concurrent enrollment in MATH 120 - Precalculus , or a higher-numbered mathematics course. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHEM 213 - Principles of Chemistry II


    (4 S.H.)

    An in-depth study of the principles of chemistry including atomic structure, the chemical bond, solutions, thermodynamics, kinetics, acid-base theory, oxidation-reduction, complex ion equilibrium, and electrochemistry. Organic and inorganic examples are used when appropriate throughout the courses, and a short unit on organic chemistry is included. Laboratory and lecture are coordinated. Meets GOAL 3. Prerequisites: High school intermediate algebra, concurrent enrollment in MATH 120 - Precalculus , or a higher-numbered mathematics course. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHEM 311 - Science Teaching Methods


    (4 S.H.)

    The pedagogical studies of current research trends and modern technology in science education will be used to prepare science majors to teach secondary school science content and process. This course provides opportunity for the qualified teaching candidate to relate to modern educational approaches to practical knowledge and experience in techniques of planning and safely conducting inquiry-based science activities, including laboratories, discussions, cooperative learning opportunities, etc. This course is a prerequisite to student teaching. Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program, GPA of 2.75 or higher, and instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    CHEM 312 - Practical Considerations of Teaching Science


    (2 S.H.)

    An opportunity for the qualified teaching candidate to obtain practical knowledge about and experience in teaching science content. Objectives include (1) program planning and evaluation; (2) evaluating current curriculum materials to determine their alignment with local, state, and national science standards; (3) modifying existing lessons and curriculum materials to align with those standards; (4) developing assessments that evaluate the learning of science concepts and methods of scientific inquiry; and (5) using research in science education to justify and defend a proposed instructional model or curriculum. Credits may not be applied toward electives category of other chemistry programs. Prerequisites: Admission to teacher education program, GPA of 2.75 or higher, and instructor’s permission. Grade or P/NC.


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    CHEM 320 - Environmental Chemistry


    (4 S.H.)

    An introductory study of current environmental issues, emphasizing the chemistry and chemical interactions underlying these topics. The topics may include, but are not limited to, global warming, depletion of stratospheric ozone, ground level air chemistry and air pollution, organic chemicals in the environment, toxic heavy metals, chemistry of natural waters, and energy production and its environmental consequences. Lecture and laboratory. Meets GOAL 10. Prerequisite: One year of general chemistry or instructor permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHEM 351 - Principles of Organic Chemistry II


    (5 S.H.)

    A thorough study of the chemistry of organic compounds, with emphasis on structure, properties, synthesis, purification, principles and mechanisms of reactions, instrumental methods, compound identification, and important biological and economic applications. Prerequisites: CHEM 350 - Principles of Organic Chemistry I  or CHEM 340 - Organic Chemistry Survey  or CHEM 341 - Organic and Polymer Chemistry  with instructor’s permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    ◎ CHEM 360 - Chemical Information


    (2 S.H.)

    Finding chemical information by on- and off-line searching of data bases by computer and by hand-searching print-form reference works such as Chemical Abstracts, dictionaries, encyclopedias, index serials, formularies, treatises, and review serials. Lecture topics will also include units on patents, institutional publications and the primary periodical literature. Includes chemical information retrieval from the Internet as well as the preparation of a bibliography on a chemical topic using exhaustive manual and computer searching of the world’s literature. Pre/corequisite: CHEM 340 - Organic Chemistry Survey  or CHEM 350 - Principles of Organic Chemistry I . Grade only. Offered annually.


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    CHEM 375 - Clinical Biochemistry


    (4 S.H.)

    One semester introduction to the chemistry of living systems. Includes laboratory. Emphasis will be placed on the structure and function of major biochemical molecules, including carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. An overview of metabolism, including anabolic and catabolic processes, will be given. Enzymatic catalysis, regulation of metabolism and transmission and expression of genetic information will be included. A major focus will be the relationship between biochemical processes and diagnosing and treating human disease. Prerequisites: CHEM 340 - Organic Chemistry Survey  or  CHEM 350 - Principles of Organic Chemistry I  and  CHEM 351 - Principles of Organic Chemistry II . Grade only. Offered annually.


    Course Registration

  
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    CHEM 399 - Chemistry Internship


    (1-6 S.H.)

    Supervised industrial, business, or government experience designed by the WSU chemistry faculty advisor, the work supervisor, and the student. Open only to the chemistry major or minor whose GPA in science and mathematics is 2.5 or better and who receives departmental approval. Prerequisites: CHEM 425 - Analytical Chemistry I . Grade or P/NC. Offered annually. Note: Only 4 S.H. available for P/NC grading option.


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    CHEM 405 - Biochemistry I


    (3 S.H.)

    Introduction to the chemistry of living organisms; emphasis on the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; enzymatic catalysis, thermodynamics, control and integration of metabolic processes; nucleotide metabolism and expression and transmission of genetic information. Prerequisite: CHEM 351 - Principles of Organic Chemistry II  or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered fall semester.


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    CHEM 407 - Biochemistry II


    (3 S.H.)

    Introduction to the chemistry of living organisms; emphasis on the structure and function of proteins, carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids; enzymatic catalysis, thermodynamics, control and integration of metabolic processes; nucleotide metabolism and expression and transmission of genetic information. Prerequisites: CHEM 405 - Biochemistry I  and △ CHEM 406 - Biochemistry I Laboratory . Grade only. Offered spring semester.


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    CHEM 411 - Synthesis and Characterization of Materials


    (3 S.H.)

    An in-depth study of polymer synthesis and characterization. The lecture portion of the course will focus on the controlled synthesis of polymeric materials including strategies for controlling polymer molecular weight, polymer architecture, and polymer microstructure. Characterization of polymers using spectroscopy, microscopy, and diffraction techniques will also be covered. The laboratory portion of the course will include synthesis of polymers using traditional addition and condensation polymerization techniques and using more recently developed methods including ROMP and ATRP. Characterization of polymers will include viscometry, thermal analysis, and spectroscopic methods. Prerequisites: CHEM 410 - Polymer Chemistry . Grade or P/NC. Offered alternate years.


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    ◆ CHEM 412 - Physical Chemistry I


    (3 S.H.)

    States of matter and equation of states. Thermodynamics of one component and multi-component systems. Equilibria. Computer applications. An introduction to quantum mechanics and spectroscopy. Prerequisites: one year each of college chemistry and physics and credit or concurrent enrollment in calculus. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    △ CHEM 413 - Physical Chemistry Laboratory I


    (1 S.H.)

    Experiments accompanying CHEM 412. Laboratory work should be taken concurrently with CHEM 412 but can be taken following successful completion of the course. Computer applications. Pre/corequisite: ◆ CHEM 412 - Physical Chemistry I . Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    ◆ CHEM 414 - Physical Chemistry II


    (3 S.H.)

    Quantum Chemistry. Chemical Kinetics: rate laws, mechanisms, temperature-dependence, catalysis. Boltzmann’s distribution. Theories of reaction rates: collision model, transition state theory, diffusion and activation-controlled reactions, quantum mechanical tunneling, isotope effects. Properties of multi-component solutions. Electrochemistry. Statistical Mechanics. Prerequisites: ◆ CHEM 412 - Physical Chemistry I . Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHEM 425 - Analytical Chemistry I


    (4 S.H.)

    A sequence of courses stressing modern analytical chemistry. A study of the theory and practice of the quantitative examination of chemical systems. This course covers volumetric and fundamental visible spectrophotometric methods. Prerequisite: one year of chemistry. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHEM 427 - Topics in Instrumental Chemistry


    (1-2 S.H.)

    Selected topics from the principles and application of the instrumental methods of IR, UV-vis, and AA spectroscopy; NMR and mass spectrometry; gas and liquid chromatography. Prerequisites: Organic and analytical chemistry and instructor’s permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered every two or three years.


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    CHEM 428 - Chemical Separations


    (3 S.H.)

    This course addresses the problems encountered in separating chemical species at both the research and development and commercial laboratory scales. Students will be introduced to a variety of separation techniques and the theoretical principles upon which the separation processes are based. Additionally, the instrumentation related to each chromatographic process will be explored. Students will become knowledgeable in the sample introduction, separation processes, detectors, and applications of instrumentation based on these techniques. Prerequisite: CHEM 425 - Analytical Chemistry I  and △ CHEM 426 - Analytical Chemistry II . Grade or P/NC. Offered occasionally.


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    △ CHEM 430 - Individual Projects in Chemistry


    (1-3 S.H.)

    An opportunity for the qualified advanced undergraduate to work independently on chemical research under the direction of a chemistry faculty member. A careful write-up of results is required. Time-arranged. Prerequisites: 13 S.H. in chemistry and instructor permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester. Maximum of three credits per semester. Repeatable up to 11 credits.


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    CHEM 436 - Topics in Environmental Chemistry


    (3 S.H.)

    This course covers advanced topics in environmental chemistry. Topics studied will depend upon the interest of the class and may include topics such as acid rain, endocrine disruption, risk assessment, global warming, and bioaccumulation. Prerequisites: CHEM 320 - Environmental Chemistry  or instructor’s permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered alternate years.


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    CHEM 439 - Biochemistry of Drug Metabolism


    (2 S.H.)

    An advanced elective that emphasizes the qualitative and quantitative chemistry of drug metabolism. Topics include pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, drug absorption, distribution and excretion, phase I and phase II biotransformation, principles of therapeutics, and toxicology. Prerequisites: CHEM 407 - Biochemistry II  or instructor’s permission. Grade or P/NC. Offered every three years.


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    CHEM 442 - Fundamentals of Molecular Modeling


    (2 S.H.)

    A practical hands-on introduction to a variety of computational modeling methods that are used to calculate, predict, and/or visualize useful properties of molecular systems such as molecular structures, atomic and molecular orbitals, IR and UV/Vis spectra, and thermodynamic quantities associated with chemical reactions. Prerequisite: CHEM 340 - Organic Chemistry Survey  or CHEM 350 - Principles of Organic Chemistry I . Grade or P/NC. Offered every two or three years.


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    CHEM 444 - Molecular Basis of Disease


    (2 S.H.)

    This course is an upper-division elective designed to instill an appreciation for the unique biochemistry associated with the causes and treatments of common communicable and non-communicable diseases. This course involves a lecture component emphasizing medical examples where biochemical understanding has provided an essential component for management of disease. This course incorporates weekly engagement with primary literature articles and presentations of the literature by small groups of students. By the end of this course, students will appreciate the causes, treatments, and societal impacts of disease on the development of the modern world. Prerequisite: △ CHEM 400 - Biochemistry I  or CHEM 405 - Biochemistry I . Grade only. Offered alternate years.


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    CHEM 450 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I


    (4 S.H.)

    Descriptive and theoretical approaches to inorganic reactions and structures with emphasis on structural concepts including symmetry and group theory and molecular orbital theory. Laboratory work includes the preparation of various main group and transition metal compounds and use of modern instruments in characterizing these compounds. Prerequisite: ◆ CHEM 412 - Physical Chemistry I . Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHEM 451 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry II


    (2 S.H.)

    An integrated, applications-focused laboratory-lecture course expanding upon the foundational concepts introduced in CHEM 450. Topics may include transition-metal catalysis, metals in medicine, and metal complexes as materials precursors as well as advanced characterization methods (e.g. X-ray crystallography). Prerequisites: ◆ CHEM 414 - Physical Chemistry II  and CHEM 450 - Advanced Inorganic Chemistry I . Grade or P/NC. Offered biannually.


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    △ CHEM 460 - Chemistry Research Proposal


    (1 S.H.)

    In this course, students learn how to develop an effective research proposal. Elements of a good proposal and clear, concise writing are emphasized. Students are required to write and present a research proposal. Prerequisites: ◎ CHEM 360 - Chemical Information  and instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered spring semester.


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    CHEM 461 - Chemistry Research


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Students conduct chemistry research on the topics of their research proposals completed in CHEM 460. A formal research report is required at the completion of CHEM 461. Time is arranged with research advisor. Prerequisites: △ CHEM 460 - Chemistry Research Proposal  and instructor permission. Grade only. Offered each semester. Repeatable up to 10 credits.


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    CHEM 470 - Isotope, Nuclear and Radiochemistry


    (2 S.H.)

    Introduction and basic treatment of the nucleus with emphasis on concepts in chemistry. Interactions of radiation with matter. Nuclear structure, stabilities and associated radioactive decay processes. Applications in nuclear reactors, particle accelerators, and medical therapies. Prerequisite: ◆ CHEM 412 - Physical Chemistry I . Grade or P/NC. Offered every two or three years.


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    CHEM 472 - Quantum Chemistry and Spectroscopy


    (2 S.H.)

    Description of quantum mechanics and application to spectroscopy of atoms and molecules. Discussion of spectroscopic techniques includes detailed derivations of microwave, infra-red, Raman, electronic, NMR, and ESR spectra. Perturbation Theory and Group Theory are introduced to determine structure of polyatomic molecules. Prerequisite: ◆ CHEM 412 - Physical Chemistry I . Grade or P/NC. Offered every two or three years.


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    ◎✪ CHEM 475 - Seminar in Chemistry


    (1 S.H.)

    Students are expected to make oral and poster presentations on literature or laboratory research. Exploration of presentations by persons outside the department is included. Additional outreach opportunities will be scheduled as permitted. Prerequisite: 20 S.H. of chemistry. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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Child Advocacy Studies

  
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    CAST 301 - Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will cover the history of child maltreatment and child advocacy in the United States and around the world, the current theoretical perspectives for understanding child maltreatment, the definitions of child maltreatment, an introduction to the professional responses to child maltreatment, an introduction to advocacy for children, and contemporary issues in the fields of child maltreatment and child advocacy. Meets GOAL 5 & GOAL 9. Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    CAST 302 - Global Child Advocacy Issues


    (3 S.H.)

    This is a core course for the child advocacy studies minor. The purpose is to prepare students to recognize child advocacy issues around the world. The course is designed for students majoring in criminal justice, education, social work, sociology, psychology, nursing, paralegal, or other areas in which knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children will be necessary. Multidisciplinary approaches to advocacy in different countries throughout the world will be presented and discussed. Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered annually.


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    CAST 401 - Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment


    (3 S.H.)

    This course focuses on the responses of professionals to allegations of child maltreatment. The purpose is to expand the student’s knowledge and skills in identifying, investigating, and prosecuting child maltreatment. The course is designed for students majoring in criminal justice, education, social work, sociology, psychology, nursing, paralegal, and other areas in which knowledge of child maltreatment investigation and advocacy are necessary. Students will receive competency-based skills training such as forensic interviewing, documentation, and so on. Prerequisites: CAST 301 - Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy . Recommended prerequisites: Developmental psychology and communication courses. Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    CAST 402 - Responding to the Survivor of Child Abuse and Survivor Responses


    (3 S.H.)

    The purpose of this course is to prepare students to recognize the effects of child maltreatment and to apply intervention strategies for children and their families. Multidisciplinary approaches to prevention, advocacy, and treatment of child maltreatment survivors will be presented and discussed. The course is designed for students majoring in criminal justice, education, social work, sociology, psychology, nursing, paralegal, or other areas in which knowledge of child maltreatment and advocating for children will be necessary. The experiential lab for this course involves courtroom observation and interaction with children. Prerequisites: CAST 301 - Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy , CAST 401 - Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment , or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    CAST 403 - Child Exploitation, Pornography, and the Internet


    (3 S.H.)

    The overall goal of this course is the study and analysis of child sexual abuse and the manner in which human and social services respond to this problem. Specifically, this course will examine the predatory actions of offenders who engage in child sexual abuse and exploitation. Included in this assessment is an understanding of how perpetrators use computers, the Internet, and emerging technologies to exploit children. Students will also learn how social services and the criminal justice system respond to this phenomenon. Thus, the student will understand and appreciate the roles of law enforcement, forensics, courts, social workers, and health service providers in the detection, investigation, and prosecution of this form of child exploitation. Grade only. Offered annually.


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    CAST 404 - Sociology of Child Poverty


    (3 S.H.)

    Students will analyze poverty and child poverty in the U.S. while placing both in an international and historical context. They will understand the demographics of poverty and the effects of poverty on children. They will critically evaluate sociological research and theories for poverty and child poverty. Students will also evaluate societal responses to poverty and child poverty, particularly as they relate to child maltreatment. This course is useful for students in fields such as nursing, criminal justice, education, social work, sociology, pre-medicine, and pre-law. Grade only. Offered annually.


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    CAST 405 - Gender, Violence, and Society


    (4 S.H.) (2 S.H. lab/2 S.H. theory)

    This course introduces students to the roots of gender-based violence, the political and the cultural structures that perpetuate it; the course also explores how this violence might be brought to an end. Students will investigate the local and global impact of violence; how gendered violence intersects with race, class, sexuality, age, physical ability and the oppressions that are linked to these identities; and strategies for addressing gender-based violence. The overlap between gender-based violence and child abuse and neglect will be addressed under each topic. As part of the class, students will complete a 45-hour advocacy training requirement and 15 hours of volunteer advocacy work offered in partnership with the Women’s Resource Center of Winona. Prerequisite: CAST 301 - Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy  or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered fall semester.


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    CAST 406 - Child Advocacy Research Studies


    (3 S.H.)

    Students will read, interpret, and evaluate the significance of research findings to child advocacy study. The course helps students understand the role of research and information technology in providing evidence-based practice for child advocacy study within their respective disciplines. Students work in small groups to critique research studies and synthesize their knowledge of the research process in the analysis of several studies. These studies focus on concepts relevant to child advocacy such as the effects of maltreatment, prevention and education; cultural elements of practice; as well as other factors that influence practice with families affected by maltreatment. This course also examines research design, ethical issues in research, the professional’s role in research, and the application of technology. Students will explore the use of computers and technology for processing and managing data. Prerequisites: CAST 301 - Perspectives on Child Maltreatment and Child Advocacy , CAST 401 - Professional and System Responses to Child Maltreatment , and CAST 402 - Responding to the Survivor of Child Abuse and Survivor Responses , or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered annually as demand warrants.


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Chinese Language

  
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    CHIN 101 - Beginning Chinese I


    (4 S.H.)

    Beginning Chinese 101 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for beginning learners. Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually. Note: Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8.


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    CHIN 102 - Beginning Chinese II


    (4 S.H.)

    Continuation of CHIN 101 - Beginning Chinese I . CHIN 102 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for beginning learners. Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. Prerequisite: CHIN 101 - Beginning Chinese I  or equivalent. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually. Note: Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8.


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    CHIN 201 - Intermediate Chinese I


    (4 S.H.)

    CHIN 201 introduces students to more advanced beginning Mandarin pronunciation, grammar, and orthography (in both Pinyin and characters). Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHIN 202 - Intermediate Chinese II


    (4 S.H.)

    CHIN 202 continues to introduce students to more advanced beginning Mandarin pronunciation, grammar, and orthography (in both Pinyin and characters). Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHIN 301 - Advanced Chinese


    (4 S.H.)

    CHIN 301 is designed for students who have completed two years of college-level training in Chinese to continue to develop their skills of aural understanding, speaking, reading and writing. Students will continue to improve their linguistic skills with a manageable degree of challenge. At the functional level, this course aims at helping students solidify their ability to comprehend and produce paragraph-level Chinese. It enables students to understand face-to-face conversations on most familiar topics, give factual accounts, read materials written in formal shumianyu Chinese, and write simple essays, reports, and all types of correspondence. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    CHIN 302 - Advanced Chinese II


    (4 S.H.)

    This course is designed for students who received a grade of B or higher in CHIN 301, or equivalent as determined by the placement test, to continue to develop their skills of aurally understanding, speaking, reading and writing in Chinese. Students will strengthen and further develop their language skills and cultural literacy by using a diversity of authentic materials and multimedia, such as news, videos, films and the Internet, pertaining to Chinese issues and values. Students will continue to improve their linguistic skills with a manageable degree of challenge. At the functional level, this course aims at helping students solidify their ability to comprehend and produce paragraph and discourse level Chinese. Topics include both traditional and contemporary Chinese social and cultural issues. By identifying, discussing, analyzing, in both oral and written forms of Chinese, students will acquire a better understanding of the language, culture, and Chinese society. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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Clinical Practice Education Studies

  
  
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    CPES 401 - Child Study Field Experiences: K-12 and 5-12


    (0 S.H.)

    The purpose of this course is the exploration of development and growth of children within K-12 and 5-12 classroom and school settings. Required: 20 field experience hours. Prerequisite: Admission to Teacher Education. Corequisite: EDFD 401 - Human Development and Learning: K-12 & 5-12 . P/NC only. Offered each semester.


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