Jul 06, 2022  
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2019-2020 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code, Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Legend:

◎ = Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

= Civic Engagement and Service Learning

 

Health, Exercise and Rehabilitative Sciences

  
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    HERS 497 - Internship in Clinical Exercise Science


    (8-12 S.H.)

    A capstone experience to foster the culmination of skills and abilities necessary for the entry-level clinical exercise science experience. Six hundred hours of clinical experience are required in the ACSM certified clinical exercise physiologist learner outcomes. Internship clinical sites are nationally located and an internship handbook details application, registration, and evaluation procedures. Prerequisites: Senior standing, all major coursework completed, and instructor’s permission. Requires current certifications in First Aid and CPR/AED, a background check, proof of health insurance, proof of current immunizations and yearly tuberculosis test. Liability insurance premium will be assessed yearly. P/NC only. Offered each semester.


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    HERS 498 - Internship in Athletic Training


    (1-12 S.H.)

    A capstone experience to foster the culmination of skills and abilities necessary for the entry-level athletic training professional. With an in-depth view of an athletic trainer’s role in the sports medicine clinic with opportunities to interact with physicians, physician assistants, physical therapists, other personnel and a diverse patient population under the direct supervision of a BOC-Certified Athletic Trainer. Opportunities for special projects, presentations and viewing surgeries may also be available.  An internship handbook details admission, registration, and evaluation procedures. Prerequisites: Senior standing, liability insurance, current CPR and First Aid certification, all major coursework must be completed, and instructor’s permission. P/NC only.


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    HERS 499 - Internship in Exercise Science


    (8-12 S.H.)

    A capstone experience in exercise science to foster the culmination of skills and abilities necessary for the entry-level exercise science professional. This is a full semester of field experience. Prerequisites: Senior standing, all major coursework completed, and instructor’s permission. Requires current certifications in First Aid and CPR/AED, a background check, proof of health insurance, proof of current immunizations and yearly tuberculosis test. Liability insurance premium will be assessed yearly. P/NC only. Offered each semester.


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Healthcare Leadership and Administration

  
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    HLA 300 - Foundations of Healthcare and Online Learning


    (2 S.H.)

    This course is designed to prepare students for success in navigating online learning environments including computer requirements, technical skills, common D2L features, support services, and learning activities. Student will also explore Healthcare knowledge, competencies, and careers. Prerequisites: Admission to HLA or instructor permission and program director notification. Grade only.


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    ◆ HLA 301 - Statistical Thinking for Healthcare


    (3 S.H.)

    An introductory course of statistical applications to the health sciences. Descriptive statistics, sampling, techniques of estimation, and hypothesis testing are included. The understanding of statistical applications as presented in health science research will be emphasized. Prerequisites: General education math requirement, HLA 300 - Foundations of Healthcare and Online Learning  and Admission to the HLA program, or instructor permission and HLA Program Director notification. Grade only.


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    HLA 310 - Fundamentals of Health and Wellness


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to seven dimensions of wellness: intellectual, spiritual, emotional, environmental, social, occupational and physical. Students will explore topics including stress management, substance abuse and addiction, interpersonal communication in the digital age, sustainability, physical activity, nutrition, health care, chronic disease risk management and healthy aging. Each topic includes a contemporary issues study module designed to engage students in trends impacting individual and community wellness today. Prerequisite: admission to HLA major and HLA 300 - Foundations of Healthcare and Online Learning  (or concurrent enrollment). Grade only. Offered annually (usually fall semester).


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    HLA 312 - Public Health Principles and Practice


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with a foundation in the theory and practice of public health promotion. Students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of the socio-cultural, political, and economic factors involved in public health. By the end of the course, students will have the theoretical and practical background necessary to enable them to play a coordinating and facilitating role in planning and implementing effective public health promotion initiatives. Prerequisites: Admission to HLA major, HLA 300 - Foundations of Healthcare and Online Learning , and HLA 310 - Fundamentals of Health and Wellness . Grade only. Offered annually (usually spring semester).


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    HLA 315 - Promoting Wellness - Tools of the Trade


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is aimed to help students gain a set of skills that they can use to promote health in wellness programs. The course focuses on finding, using and evaluating resources for the design and management of health and wellness programs. It also introduces social marketing concepts for communicating health and wellness issues and provides guidance for crafting effective health promotion messages. Prerequisites: Admission to HLA major and HLA 300 - Foundations of Healthcare and Online Learning . Grade only. Offered annually (usually fall semester).


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    HLA 325 - Transcultural Issues in Health Care


    (3 S.H.)

    Explores the importance of transcultural concepts that are present in health care delivery systems. It is designed to help learners increase awareness of all types of human diversity, understand the importance of these diverse differences, and incorporate ways of utilizing this knowledge to deliver culturally competent health care in all settings within the global community. Prerequisites: admission to HLA program, HLA 300 - Foundations of Healthcare and Online Learning  (or current enrollment), or instructor permission and HLA Program Director notification. Grade only.


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    ◎ HLA 366 - Professional Communication Skills for Health Care Leaders


    (3 S.H.)

    This online course will allow you to explore and apply communication theories, concepts, tools, and techniques necessary for appropriate and effective communication as a leader in diverse professional and organizational settings in the health care field. The course emphasizes group collaboration and oral communication skills, including presentational speaking and the use of presentational technology. This course prepares students to interview for and work in health care organizations, internships, and consulting. Prerequisites: CMST 191 - Introduction to Public Speaking , CMST 192 - Introduction to Speech Communication , or completion of the communication credits required for Goal 1, Basic Skills, in the Minnesota Transfer Curriculum (MnTC); HLA 300 - Foundations of Healthcare and Online Learning  (or concurrent enrollment), or instructor permission and HLA program director notification. Grade only.


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    HLA 400 - Current Topics in Healthcare Leadership


    (1-6 S.H.)

    Contemporary topics will be presented relating to the core healthcare competencies of the HLA major which are 1) Communication and Relationship Management, 2) Professionalism, 3) Knowledge of Healthcare Environment, 4) Leadership and Critical Thinking, and 5) Business Skills and Knowledge. Courses will be offered as permissible and will be variable credit. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually or when demand warrants.


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    △ HLA 414 - Health Care Policy/Quality Healthcare Delivery


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides a base for health professionals to shape health care policy in the work place, organizations, communities, and government at the local, state and federal level. Issues shaping health care, such as analysis of the health care financing, patient quality and safety, and healthcare practice models are analyzed. Tools for being a health care advocate are discussed. Prerequisites: Admission to the HLA program, HLA 300 - Foundations of Healthcare and Online Learning , HLA 325 - Transcultural Issues in Health Care  or Instructor’s permission and HLA Program Director notification. Grade only.


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    ◎ HLA 422 - Health and Wellness Management Capstone & Career Pathway


    (3 S.H.)

    The Health and Wellness Management capstone and Career Pathway course is designed as a final milestone for students to demonstrate the ability to use interdisciplinary methods to draw together different areas of study focusing on relevant Health and Wellness concepts and concerns and plan for their career. Students will rely heavily on knowledge and skills learned in previous program courses to demonstrate transferable skills. With this course, the student continues to develop a vision of their future professional development. This course should lead the student to the completion of the Winona State University Healthcare Leadership and Administration: Health and Wellness Management Option program outcomes along with preparing the students to enter the professional workforce. To assist students in developing and implementing a professional career/job search through greater understanding of resources available to them. To conduct a job search that will provide the most satisfying rewards to the students. The students will understand how critical every aspect of the job search is and how it relates to receiving a professional position. Finally, the students will understand how marketable they are to employers and how best to display that marketability. Prerequisites: Admission to HLA: Health and Wellness Management Option, in final semester of coursework or instructor permission with notification of HLA Program Director. Grade only. Offered annually.


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    HLA 452 - Financial Resource Management in Healthcare


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces and examines financial resource management in healthcare through academic and practical, real-life approaches. This course will start with understanding financial terminology to be able to communicate with financial and non-financial leaders across the healthcare organization. The focus of the class will then turn to basic accounting practices, preparation of financial reports, participating in annual and capital budget preparations, cost accounting, forecasting, and analysis of financial statements. Professionally recognized financial management tools and techniques will be explored for healthcare leaders to make better financial, operational and strategic decisions and monitor organizational financial progress. Prerequisites: admission to HLA major and ◆ HLA 301 - Statistical Thinking for Healthcare . Grade only. Offered annually.


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    HLA 490 - Healthcare Professional Development


    (2 S.H.)

    This course synthesizes all previous courses and is designed to encapsulate the essence of baccalaureate professional role development. With this course the student continues to develop a vision of their future professional development. This course will culminate the student’s degree and launch the student into a new career phase. Prerequisites: Admission to HLA, final semester/summer of HLA coursework or permission of instructor with notification of HLA Program Director. Grade only.


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History

  
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    HIST 101 - Introduction to Law and Society


    (1 S.H.)

    An introduction to interdisciplinary studies as it relates to the law and society major. Students will examine a series of historical and contemporary legal issues from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. This course is required of all law and society majors. Grade only.


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    HIST 110 - Introduction to Environmental History


    (3 S.H.)

    In this course, students will receive a broad introduction to the field of environmental history. Important concepts and methods associated with the field will be presented in the context of American history, though the course realizes global inter-connections of themes and material over time. Units in the course will range chronologically from the pre-Columbian world to the modern, industrial United States. Since the early 1970s, the field of environmental history has emerged as an important sub-field of history, or way of analyzing the past. Though practitioners offer different definitions of the field, they agree that at its base level, environmental history is the study of the relationship between humans and their physical environments. This relationship will be explored through dialogues between humans and the natural world over time. Topics include, but not limited to, the role of germs, (for instance, in the colonization of North America); the ways in which human envisioned and molded the natural world (through agriculture, industrialization, and urbanization), and the emergence of conservation and reform movements, including park and land preservation, environmental regulation, and resource management. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 10. Grade or P/NC. Offered annually.


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    HIST 115 - Modern World History


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will examine several thematic topics in Word History throughout the long 20th century. Themes include imperialism, nationalism, ideologies, war and peace, livelihood and identity, immigration and labor migration, de-colonization, the demise of communism, and the realignment of the post-Cold War world. Major turning points include World War I, the rise of totalitarianism, World War II, the Cold War, the rise of the Third World, and the modern tension between McWorld and the local. This survey will examine the history of change and continuity in world cultures and societies, with an emphasis on the responses of the peoples of the world and the dynamic process entailed. Students will learn to think critically about historical events and processes and assess the impact of these upon the peoples of the world today. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC. Offered each semester.


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    HIST 120 - Western Civilization to 1500


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of Western traditions and institutions from their beginnings in Egypt and Mesopotamia through Greece, Rome and the Middle Ages. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    HIST 121 - Western Civilization 1500-1815


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of the European Renaissance, Protestant Reformation, development of the nation state, the Enlightenment, Commercial and Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    HIST 122 - Western Civilization 1815 to Present


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of European traditions and institutions from the fall of Napoleon to the present, stressing the Industrial Revolution, nationalism, imperialism, the rise of totalitarianism, World War II, the Cold War and post-Cold War problems. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    HIST 123 - East Asian Civilization


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of China, Korea, and Japan from the pre-modern era to the present. The course analyzes traditional institutions and values and responses to Western imperialism. Topics include Japan’s Meiji Restoration and expansionism, Japanese colonial rule in Korea, traditional China’s collapse and revolutionary movements, World War II, the Korean War, China’s Communist reconstruction and post-communist economy, the continued partition of the Korean Peninsula, North Korean nuclear ambitions, and Japan’s re-emergence as a world power. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Grade only.


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    HIST 125 - Classical History


    (3 S.H.)

    The history of Greece from the Homeric time of Plato to the Roman Republic. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 9. Grade only.


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    HIST 140 - History of Medicine, Drugs and Life Sciences


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to important developments in the history of medicine, drugs and the life sciences, covering the period between antiquity and the present. It examines how past thinkers and world cultures understood the human body and its relationship to its living environment. It pursues how such ideas and relationships changed over time leading to the development of modern medicine and the life sciences. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 10. Grade only. Offered annually.


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    HIST 150 - United States History to 1865


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of United States history from prehistoric times to the American Civil War. Special emphasis is placed on political developments and public policy as well as the origins and consequences of slavery and ethnic, cultural, and regional diversity and conflict. Also emphasized is the transformation of social and economic systems. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of United States history since the American Civil War with special emphasis on post-Civil War Reconstruction, late 19th-century economic and social developments and 20th-century reform movements. Additionally, foreign policy and the overseas expansion of the U.S. economy receive attention, as do Cold War and post-Cold War developments.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 7. Grade only. Offered each semester.


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    HIST 165 - Latin American History


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to present including the colonial period, the struggle for independence and the rise of modern Latin American nations. Special emphasis is placed on Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Grade only.


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    HIST 170 - African Civilization


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of African history from prehistoric times to the present. The emphasis is on African social, cultural, and political history. The periods of study include Africa in the ancient world, medieval Africa, the slave trade, the era of European colonialism, the rise of nationalism, and independence movements and contemporary Africa. Meets GOAL 5. Grade only.


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    HIST 214 - The Mississippi River in U.S. History


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of the significance of the Mississippi River in U.S. history. The course emphasizes the role of the river in Native American life and early European exploration of the Midwest, and the efforts of European powers and the newly created U.S. to control the river. The course also studies the role of the river in economic change, slavery, pre-Civil War immigration, and federal policy. The course will also consider the western theater of the Civil War; the post-war bridging of the river and industrial development along it; and its 20th century flooding, damning, and related controversies.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 10. Grade only.


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    HIST 215 - Minnesota History


    (3 S.H.)

    History of the land and people of Minnesota. Emphasis is on social, cultural, economic, and political history of indigenous and immigrant groups in Minnesota during the 19th and 20th centuries. Grade only.


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    HIST 220 - Introduction to African-American History


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will introduce students to African American history. It examines the full breadth of African American history, starting with Africa in the years before the international slave trade and concluding with the Civil Rights movement and more recent developments in the United States. History majors and minors may count this class among their history electives. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 7. Grade only.


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    HIST 235 - History of the American Indian


    (3 S.H.)

    This course traces the history of Native Americans from pre-Columbian times forward to the present day. It emphasizes both the broad, shared experience of natives, regardless of tribal identity, and the more particular experience of individual tribal groups, especially those of the Upper Midwest and Plains regions. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 7. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 295 - Sophomore Seminar


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to historical thinking and research skills through an in-depth study of a theme selected by the professor. Themes are variable by semester. The course includes hands-on field and research experiences, along with presentation opportunities in an academic setting. Grade only.


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    HIST 298 - Historical Research Methods and Historiography


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to historical research and criticism that exposes students to the sources, resources and techniques of research and evaluation of research as well as divergent historiography traditions. Prerequisites: History major or minor standing, law and society major standing, or social science/history major standing, ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  , and instructor’s permission. Limited to 20 students. Grade only.


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    HIST 320 - North American Indian Civilization


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines important issues in the history of North American Natives: prehistoric interactions among Native groups, Native reaction and interaction with early Europeans, cultural issues such as the outlawing of Native languages and Native customs, the American Indian Movement, the First Nations Movement, and the anti-Columbus protests. It discusses both Canada and the United States in an effort to include all North American Native groups. Prerequisite: HIST 235 - History of the American Indian . Grade only.


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    HIST 330 - Psycho-History


    (3 S.H.)

    The application of psychoanalytical theory to history. Part of the course will focus on the study of psychoanalytic theory. The rest of the course will focus on the application of theory to history. Grade only.


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    HIST 335 - The Holocaust


    (3 S.H.)

    An historical study and analysis of the Nazi Holocaust from 1933 to 1945. Grade only.


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    HIST 340 - History of Christianity


    (3 S.H.)

    The development of Christianity from the time of Christ to the present, with emphasis on the interplay between Christianity and the political, economic, social, and cultural structures of various historical ages. Grade only.


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    HIST 341 - Modern Japan


    (3 S.H.)

    The course traces and analyzes the principal developments that shaped modern Japan. Beginning with examination of 17th- and 18th-century Tokugawa culture and institutions, the course will then explore the sources and consequences of the revolution Meiji “Restoration.” The course will then consider Japan’s march toward the Pacific War, and the post-World War II revival. Prerequisites: HIST 123 - East Asian Civilization  and ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 343 - Modern China


    (3 S.H.)

    This course permits in-depth study of the major events and issues in China’s dynamic transformation from the world’s oldest and largest bureaucracy to a revolutionary state and its subsequent evolution to the contemporary political and economic phenomenon we know today. Tracing pre-modern legacies that have helped shape China, the course covers the decline and fall of the Qing dynasty through the creation of Communist China and the unfolding of the post-Mao, so-called “reform era.” The course will also address the lesser-known areas of Tibet and Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, as well as Hong Kong and Taiwan. Grade only.


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    HIST 345 - History of American Sports


    (3 S.H.)

    An historical look at the place and value of sport in American culture. Grade only.


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    HIST 355 - European Intellectual and Cultural History


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the history of the development and basic concepts in European religious, philosophical, political, legal, scientific, and social thought and their impact on Western culture. Grade only.


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    HIST 360 - Introduction to Historical Museums


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with an overview of the field of historical museums and public history. It will examine the history of museums, museum management, collections care, management of historical libraries and archives, fundraising and budgeting, and the development of exhibits and public programming. It will also survey opportunities available in public history. Required student projects will make use of the resources of the Winona County Historical Society. Prerequisites: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865 . Grade only.


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    △ HIST 365 - American Legal History


    (3 S.H.)

    An overview of Anglo-American legal history from pre-colonial England to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of substantive law, including real property law, business law, family law, and personal injury law. The class emphasizes legal development in social, political, and economic contexts. Prerequisites: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 390 - Historical Museum Internship


    (3-15 S.H.)

    Placement in the Winona County Historical Society Museum or other historical museum for the purpose of experience and training in the field of public history. Prerequisites: HIST 360 - Introduction to Historical Museums  and department permission. P/NC only. Note: Internship credits may not be counted toward completion of the history major or minor.


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    HIST 397 - Topics in History


    (1-3 S.H.)

    In-depth study of current topics in society and the historical profession. Grade only. Repeatable as topics change.


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    ◎ HIST 398 - Topics in History with Oral Communication Emphasis


    (3 S.H.)

    In-depth study of topics of current concern to historians including newer areas of research, emerging themes, and recent interpretive debates. The assignments will include an emphasis on discussion and oral presentations. Grade only.


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    △ HIST 403 - Middle Ages


    (3 S.H.)

    The decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic kingdoms, the early Christian Church, the development of feudalism and manorialism, the economic recovery of Europe, civilization of the High Middle Ages, rise of the national monarchies. Prerequisite: HIST 120 - Western Civilization to 1500  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 412 - French Revolution and Napoleon


    (3 S.H.)

    Intellectual, cultural, economic, and political origins of the French Revolution; a decade of revolution; the Napoleon Era; and the legacy of the revolution. Prerequisite: HIST 121 - Western Civilization 1500-1815  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 421 - Tudor and Stuart England


    (3 S.H.)

    The transition from medieval to modern England, the Reformation, the Age of Elizabeth, and the constitutional and social conflicts of the 17th century. Prerequisite: HIST 121 - Western Civilization 1500-1815  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 423 - Modern England


    (3 S.H.)

    England in the modern era from the height of imperial power to the present. Grade only.


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    △ HIST 428 - The History of Biography


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an examination of the history of the literary form known as biography and autobiography. The course examines five different types of biographies that have evolved from the time of Plutarch to the present. Students will examine texts and determine what makes the biography effective (or not) as an illustration of the human condition. Grade only.


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    HIST 431 - Social Science/History Teaching Professional Capstone


    (3 S.H.)

    History 431 is a “capstone” course taught by a history professor that addresses numerous topics and themes important to aspiring social science/history teachers. The course will cover recent debates about the teaching of American, European, and world history. Additional topics include curriculum development, methods of historical inquiry, the use of primary and secondary sources in the classroom, creating active learning opportunities based on primary sources, the use of technology in student teaching and research, assignment design and evaluation, and the use of local history in Unit Plans. In addition, the course reviews state and national standards in the teaching of the social sciences. Grade only.


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    △ HIST 434 - Soviet Russia (1905-Present)


    (3 S.H.)

    The history of the Soviet Union and Russia during the 20th century. Topics include the 1905 and 1917 Revolutions, the development of the Soviet command economy, Stalin’s political purges and cultural revolution, World War II, and the Cold War. The course will also discuss the collapse of Soviet Communism and the Yeltsin era. Prerequisites: HIST 122 - Western Civilization 1815 to Present  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 461 - Latin American Social Revolution


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of Latin American’s major revolutionary movements of the 20th century and their differing ideologies. Special emphasis on revolutionary movements in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Central America. Grade only.


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    △ HIST 463 - History of Mexico


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an in-depth examination of the history of the Mexican nation from pre-historic times to the present. Themes discussed include the Native American and Spanish roots of Mexican culture, the coming of independence and the construction of the nation state, the liberal-conservative conflict, the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the continuing Mexican Revolution, and the rise of the neo-Porfirian state in recent decades. Grade only.


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    △ HIST 467 - Foreign Travelers in Exotic Lands


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to study select British and American travelers in the 19th and 20th centuries who visited and wrote about exotic places such as South America, Mexico, Africa, or the South Sea Islands. The course explores what happens to these writers at the point of contact and will critique their subsequent evaluations of the different cultures that they visited. Grade only.


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    HIST 468 - History of the Andean Nations


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with an in-depth examination of the history of the Andean nations of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia from pre-Hispanic times to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the development of an indigenous culture’s adaptation to their environment; the emergence of sophisticated urban traditions and cultures; the growth of the Inca empire; the encounter with the Spanish in the 16th century; the evolution of a unique Andean culture; the growing conflicts within the imperial system that led to independence; the quest for nationhood and modernization in the 19th century; and the rise of populism, social reformers, militarism, drug trafficking, and other current challenges. Grade only.


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    HIST 469 - History of Brazil


    (3 S.H.)

    Brazilian history from European discovery to the present. The course emphasizes Portuguese exploration and colonization, the development of slavery and its abolition, and Brazil’s experience with industrialization and world power status. Grade only.


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    HIST 476 - The American Revolution


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines the origins of the Revolution; the War for Independence; social, economic, and cultural change during the Revolution; and the origins, and creation, and ratification of the Constitution of 1787. Prerequisite: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 477 - The Age of Jackson


    (3 S.H.)

    Traces the political, social, intellectual, and cultural development of the United States from the 1820s through the 1840s. Topics include Jacksonian politics, Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War, northern society, the South and slavery, ante-bellum reform movements and Romanticism. Prerequisite: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865 . Grade only.


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    HIST 478 - The Old South


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines many issues, topics, and themes central to the history of the American South (ca. 1800 to 1860). Among the key topics that we look at are the colonial origins, the origins and evolution of planter culture, the nature of yeomen society, the diverse lives of southern women, the economics of slavery, slave life and culture, the politics of slavery and the coming of the Civil War, and the rise and fall of the Confederacy. Grade only.


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    HIST 479 - The Civil War and Reconstruction


    (3 S.H.)

    Explores the culture and society of ante-bellum America, origins of the war, and political and military development of the war. The course will then explore Reconstruction of the Southern political, social and economic orders and the southern counter-revolution of the 1870s. Prerequisite: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 480 - Gilded Age of America (1877-1900)


    (3 S.H.)

    Explores late 19th-century corporate, industrial development and its social, cultural and political consequences. The course pays special attention to both old-fashioned, communitarian counter-attacks and progressive, radical opposition to the new economic order in rural and urban settings. It also explores the mass immigration and new urban political and social structures that economic change generated. The course concludes with consideration of the emergence of the New Empire amidst the Spanish-American War. Prerequisites: HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  and ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    HIST 483 - The Progressive Era and the “New Era” Twenties (1901-1929)


    (3 S.H.)

    Consideration will be given to the cultural and economic crisis of the 1890s, the progressive impulse, varieties of progressive reform, progressive foreign policy and World War I, postwar adjustment problems and select social phenomena of the Twenties. The course will conclude with study of Herbert Hoover’s economic and political vision. Prerequisite: HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    △ HIST 484 - Depression, New Deal and War (1929-1945)


    (3 S.H.)

    The course explores the Great Depression, which began in 1929 with emphasis on the economic, social and psychological causes and consequences, Herbert Hoover’s responses to it and FDR’s New Deal Revolution, and the role of the United States in World War II and developments on the home front. Prerequisite: HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    △ HIST 485 - Contemporary America 1945-Present


    (3 S.H.)

    The course explores the causes and consequences of the Cold War including McCarthyism, U.S. involvement in the Korean War, and selected post-war problems in foreign policy, mass society and social alienation. It also explores the reforms and social movements of the Great Society era and the development of contemporary conservatism and consumer-oriented neo-liberalism. Prerequisite: HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.


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    ◆ HIST 495 - Senior Research Seminar I


    (3 S.H.)

    This course, offered in the fall semester, is the first of a two-course sequence in which students develop their Senior Thesis topic that will be intensively researched and written in △ HIST 496 - Senior Research Seminar II  the following spring semester. While the work in this class builds on all the coursework done by students as History or Law and Society majors at Winona State University, it also develops students’ understanding of primary/secondary sources and historiographic thinking as taught in HIST 298 - Historical Research Methods and Historiography . Prerequisites: Major status in history or social science/history or law and society, senior standing, HIST 298 - Historical Research Methods and Historiography , and instructor’s permission. Students must be carrying no Incompletes at time of registration. Grade only. Note: Students who want to take HIST 495 in the fall semester must get a blue card from the instructor and register for HIST 495 by the last day of classes of the preceding spring semester.


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    HIST 499 - Independent Readings in History


    (1-3 S.H.)

    The exact nature of this course will be determined by the needs of the student. Prerequisite: instructor permission. Grade only. Offered each semester. Repeatable up to nine credits.


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Individualized Studies

  
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    ◎ INDS 300 - Academic Planning and Career Foundations


    (3 S.H.)

    This course guides students through an individualized process connecting personal strengths and skills with academic planning. The course is particularly relevant to students developing a customized degree through Individualized Studies and is also helpful for undecided students who are considering various majors. Students will develop their own educational plan while exploring career interests and their own stage of development. Grade only. Offered fall, spring, and summer terms.


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    INDS 398 - Internship


    (1-3 S.H.)

    This course provides the opportunity for Individualized Studies majors and minors to integrate theoretical knowledge with practical skills through an internship under the supervision of an on-site professional and a faculty supervisor. Prerequisite: departmental approval. Grade only. Offered each semester. Note: Majors may combine this course with INDS 399 - Internship  for a maximum of 12 S.H. Minors may combine this course with INDS 399 - Internship  for a maximum of 6 S.H. toward INDS minor.


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    INDS 399 - Internship


    (1-9 S.H.)

    This course provides the opportunity for Individualized Studies majors and minors to integrate theoretical knowledge with practical skills through an internship under the supervision of an on-site professional and a faculty supervisor. Prerequisite: departmental approval. P/NC only. Offered each semester. Note: Majors may combine this course with INDS 398 - Internship  for a maximum of 12 S.H. Minors may combine for a maximum of 6 S.H. toward INDS minor.


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    △ INDS 495 - Capstone Seminar


    (3 S.H.)

    This course allows students to reflect on the courses and work they have completed in their course plans and create professional and personal goals based on their personal strengths. Students will investigate career options as well as a significant organizational dynamic they believe they might face in a professional setting, either as a professional or a volunteer. Students will review the tools used for academic research in various disciplines and write a research paper that demonstrates both their writing skills and ability to synthesize academic research. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  (or equivalent) and ◎ INDS 300 - Academic Planning and Career Foundations , or instructor permission. Grade only. Offered fall, spring, and summer terms.


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Japanese

  
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    JPN 101 - Beginning Japanese I


    (4 S.H.)

    JPN 101 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for beginning learners. Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade or P/NC.


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    JPN 102 - Beginning Japanese II


    (4 S.H.)

    Continuation of JPN 101 - Beginning Japanese I . JPN 102 is designed to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for beginning learners. Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Prerequisite: JPN 101 - Beginning Japanese I  or equivalent. Grade only.


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    JPN 201 - Intermediate Japanese I


    (4 S.H.)

    JPN 201 is designed as a continuation of JPN 102 - Beginning Japanese II  to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for advanced beginning learners. Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade only.


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    JPN 202 - Intermediate Japanese II


    (4 S.H.)

    JPN 202 is designed as a continuation of JPN 201 - Intermediate Japanese I  to acquaint students with grammatical structures and vocabulary appropriate for advanced beginning learners. Instruction focuses on development of all four skills (speaking, listening, reading, and writing) and cultural knowledge. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade only.


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    JPN 301 - Advanced Japanese


    (4 S.H.)

    JPN 301 is designed to build upon skills acquired in the JPN 101 - Beginning Japanese I  - JPN 202 - Intermediate Japanese II  course sequence. While continuing its general emphasis on building speaking proficiency, Advanced Japanese also seeks to expand reading and writing skills; the course includes substantial reading assignments. Students will also be required to master approximately 400 new Kanji (Chinese characters). Grade or P/NC. Offered fall semester.


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    JPN 302 - Advanced Japanese II


    (4 S.H.)

    JPN 302 is a continuation of JPN 301 - Advanced Japanese . While continuing its general emphasis on building speaking proficiency, JPN 302 also expands on reading and writing skills developed in JPN 301 - Advanced Japanese . The course includes substantial reading assignments, and students will be expected to master approximately 500 new Kanji (Chinese characters). Prerequisites: Successful completion of JPN 301 (Advanced Japanese) or its equivalent with a grade of “C” or better. Students may place into the course by passing a placement exam with a score of 80 or better. Grade or P/NC. Offered spring semester.


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Leadership Education

  
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    LDRS 414 - Health Care Introduction to Change Leadership


    (3 S.H.)

    Understanding how individuals engage in change is critical. Students in this course will explore theory, models, and methods for leading and understanding change. Students will study problems and issues influencing individual and group behavior in organizations, and develop collaborative practices and strategies to lead change. Grade only. Offered annually.


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