Sep 25, 2021  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code,  Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Note:

◎= Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

 

Physics

  
  
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    PHYS 441 - Mathematical Methods in Physics II


    (3 S.H.)

    Eigenvalue problems, Sturm-Liouville theory, Matrix theory, numerical techniques, special functions, and Laplace and Fourier transforms. Prerequisite:  PHYS 440 - Mathematical Methods in Physics I . Offered on demand.
  
  
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    ◎ PHYS 460 - Undergraduate Research


    (1-4 S.H.)

    An opportunity for an advanced physics student to work with a faculty member on an independent research project. A written report and oral presentation are required on results of the research. Offered each semester.
  
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    PHYS 490 - Individual Problems in Physics


    (1-3 S.H.)

    An opportunity for the qualified advanced undergraduate to work independently. Topics may include research, development of special skills, selected readings, etc. Prerequisite: Physics advisor’s permission. Offered on demand as an arranged class. May be repeated to a total of three credits.

Political Science

  
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    POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the purposes of American government, civil rights, the federal system, the powers and functions of the three branches of government, political parties and interest groups, and contemporary problems. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 9. Offered each semester.
  
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    POLS 130 - Introduction to International Relations


    (3 S.H.)

    A general introduction to the major concepts and theories employed to analyze world affairs, and to the behavior of major actors involved—states, international organizations, and multinational corporations. Meets GOAL 5. Offered each semester.
  
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    POLS 135 - Comparative Political Systems


    (3 S.H.)

    Comparative study of different political systems with an emphasis on the frameworks used to compare them, and the concepts used to analyze and describe politics in different countries. Also includes case studies. Meets GOAL 9. Offered each semester.
  
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    POLS 150 - Introduction to Political Theory


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is an introduction to the study, reading, and analysis of political texts, designed for students who do not have much familiarity with politics or theory, but are interested in investigating enduring questions of political thought, such as: What is freedom? What is the relationship between politics and conflict? What does it mean to be a member of a polity? What is justice? Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Offered yearly.
  
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    POLS 177 - Human Nature, Politics and Violence


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the modern and enduring questions about violence—its origins, causes, and cures. This course explores violence from a political science and an interdisciplinary perspective.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Offered each semester.
  
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    POLS 199 - First-Year Seminar


    (1-3 S.H.)

    An open discussion of some political topics of current interest. Discussion centers around causes and possible remedies of some of the maladies of modern society. Different alternatives are discussed with an eye toward acquiring a better understanding of the problems. May be taken for up to 3 semester hours.
  
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    POLS 205 - The United Nations in World Affairs


    (3 S.H.)

    This course deals with the goals, structure, and functions of the United Nations and the way it deals with international issues of war, peace, and development. Offered every two years. Meets GOAL 8.
  
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    POLS 218 - Community Service


    (3 S.H.)

    Democratic theory calls for participation of citizens not only in decision-making but also in community affairs. Students will be offered the opportunity to be involved in their community by volunteering their services and time to not-for-profit organizations as a community service. Such participation would foster community asset building and be beneficial to both the student volunteer and the community at large. Meets GOAL 9.
  
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    POLS 220 - Civil Rights and Civil Liberties


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of current controversies regarding civil rights and civil liberties, such as the right to privacy, freedom of speech, affirmative action, sexual harassment, gay rights, etc. Meets GOAL 9. Recommended prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics .
  
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    POLS 221 - State and Local Government


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the structure and policies of state and local governments in the U.S. and the relationships among national, state, and local governments in the areas of education, welfare, criminal justice, economic development, and environmental protection.  Meets GOAL 5.
  
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    POLS 224 - Politics & Society in Latin American


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the impact of factors such as religion, wealth, natural resources, modern ideologies, and nationalism on the lives of individuals, groups, and countries of Latin America and their politics.
  
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    POLS 225 - Ethnic Conflict and Nationalism


    (3 S.H.)

    Since the end of the Cold War, there has been an increase in nationalism and ethnic conflict throughout the world. This course analyzes this increasingly important international phenomenon, focusing on the causes and the characteristics of nationalism, the international consequences of what might appear to be national problems, and the prospects of conflict resolution and political reform in areas suffering from these problems. Meets GOAL 7. Offered yearly.
  
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    POLS 226 - Politics & Society in Africa


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the political cultures of African nations north and south of the Sahara. A study of the impact of factors such as religion, wealth, natural resources, geographic location, and ethnic mix, modern ideologies on the lives of individuals and nations and on the politics of the African nations. Meets GOAL 7. Offered fall semester.
  
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    POLS 227 - Judicial Process & Politics


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an overview of the American legal process from a political perspective, covering basic court structure, legal actors, criminal and civil procedures, judicial impact, and comparative court systems. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics  or instructor’s permission. Offered yearly.
  
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    POLS 228 - Public Service


    (3 S.H.)

    The theory and practice of public service and administration. The emphasis is on political processes as they affect administrative policy and problem solving in public and non-profit organizations.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 9. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics . Offered yearly.
  
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    △ POLS 260 - Classical Political Thought


    (3 S.H.)

    What is politics? This course looks at Greek and Christian thinkers who first considered this question, from Sophocles to Plato to St. Augustine. Offered every two years.
  
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    POLS 270 - Politics and Society in the Middle East


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the impact of factors such as religion, wealth, natural resources, traditional ideologies, and modern ideologies on the lives of individuals and nations and on politics in the countries of the Middle East and among them. Meets GOAL 7. Offered yearly.
  
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    ◆ POLS 280 - Introduction to Political Analysis


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to political research. Topics include approaches and methods used in political research, framing research questions, developing and testing hypotheses, evaluating research, defining concepts, measuring variables, making observations, analyzing data, and presenting research findings. It is recommended that students complete this course before enrolling in 300- or 400-level courses. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics  or instructor’s permission. Offered yearly.
  
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    POLS 315 - American Political Thought


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the role of ideas in shaping American politics. Covering major political movements in the U.S. including revolutionary thought, constitutionalism, populism, pragmatism, socialism, conservatism, communitarianism, and feminism. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics . Grade and P/NC. Offered every two years. Note: Effective Spring 2014: No prerequisites necessary.
  
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    POLS 320 - Constitutional Law


    (3 S.H.)

    Judicial function in constitutional cases; division of powers between the nation and the states, and within the national government; powers of the President, limitations on the powers of government, separation of powers; protection of individual rights. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics .
  
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    △ POLS 321 - American Presidency


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the institution of the presidency, the gradual growth of formal and informal tools of presidential power, the influence that different presidents have brought to the office, the significance of presidential style and character, recruitment patterns for the presidency, and various suggestions to reform the institution. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics . Offered yearly.
  
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    △ POLS 322 - Political Parties, Interest Groups, and Special Movements


    (3 S.H.)

    Development, characteristics, organization, and politics of the major American political parties. Includes an examination of the nominating process, party campaigns and finances, elections, voting behavior, and the role and behavior of interest groups and social movements in our electoral and policy process. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics  . Offered yearly.
  
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    △ POLS 325 - Modern Political Theory (History of Political Thought)


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the political ideas central to liberalism and its critics. Focus will be on Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, and Marx. Grade and P/NC option. Offered every two years. Note: Effective Summer 2014: course title will change to: “History of Political Thought.” Course description will change to: An examination of the history of political theory in Western civilization. This course will study the political ideas of various major thinkers from the classical and modern periods. Focus will be on Plato, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  or ENG 112 - Research Writing .
  
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    △ POLS 330 - Race & American Politics


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the impact, effects, and consequences of race and racism in American politics. Emphasis is placed on the political consequences of race and racism within American politics. Prerequisite:  POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics  or instructor’s permission. Offered yearly.
  
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    POLS 332 - European Political Systems


    (3 S.H.)

    A comparative study of the ideological, social, economic, and institutional developments of European (East and West) domestic politics and the European Union. Emphasis is placed on the interaction of developments between the domestic and supranational levels of governance. Meets GOAL 9. Prerequisite: POLS 135 - Comparative Political Systems  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    △ POLS 333 - Media and Politics


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the role, process and power of the mass media in American politics. Includes an examination of media impact and effects at the individual, group, institutional, and cultural levels in American politics. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics  or instructor’s permission. Offered yearly.
  
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    POLS 335 - Politics in Latin America


    (3 S.H.)

    A comparative study of the political development of South American, Central American, and Caribbean countries. Emphasis is placed on cultural, institutional, and economic factors of their development.  Meets GOAL 7. Prerequisite: POLS 135 - Comparative Political Systems  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    △ POLS 336 - Post Communist Political Systems


    (3 S.H.)

    A comparative study of transitions from communist to liberal political and economic systems, and an analysis of unique problems of conversion from totalitarian systems to democracy, and from command economies to market economies. The course also includes discussion of countries that did not make the above transition. Prerequisite: POLS 135 - Comparative Political Systems  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    POLS 337 - Asian Political Systems


    (3 S.H.)

    A comparative study of the political systems in Asia with an emphasis on the structure of governments, the extent of their effectiveness and the role of non-governmental actors: army; political parties; economic, social, and cultural groups in politics. Variable focus on either the major powers, such as China, Japan, and India, or the Asia Pacific countries and the factors responsible for their economic dynamism. Prerequisite: POLS 135 - Comparative Political Systems  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    POLS 340 - Environmental Policy


    (3 S.H.)

    A seminar in environmental policy analysis. Students examine and assess a variety of global, national, local, and inter-governmental environmental problems and governmental efforts in response to these problems. Special emphasis is placed on air and water pollution, erosion, toxic wastes, species loss, and population growth. Meets GOAL 10.
  
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    POLS 341 - Health Care Politics & Policy


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of the politics of health care. Special emphasis is placed on the formulation of health care policy and policy reform in the United States; however, health care systems of other industrialized nations and developing nations are also examined.
  
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    POLS 342 - International Political Economy


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the relationship between international politics and international economics and the theories of international political economy. The topics include the following: the politics of international trade, investment, and foreign aid; the consequences of the multi-national corporations on international relations and their political role; economic foreign policy-making and its implications for national and international politics. Prerequisite: POLS 130 - Introduction to International Relations  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    POLS 343 - Human Rights in Theory and Practice


    (3 S.H.)

    Human rights are those rights possessed by individuals by virtue of being human. They are distinct from civil rights, which are guaranteed by civil societies. This course seeks to identify the basic human rights of individuals as human beings, the evolution of these rights, the philosophical foundations of those rights, and the legal remedies available to victims of violations. The course discusses the roles of national and international communities in protecting human rights including the establishment of a permanent criminal court to prosecute human rights violations. Meets GOAL 9.
  
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    POLS 346 - International Law


    (3 S.H.)

    The nature and sources of international law; jurisdiction of states over persons and territory; recognition of states and governments; law of the sea; principle of state responsibility; law of treaties; and transnational legal problems. Prerequisite: POLS 130 - Introduction to International Relations  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    △ POLS 347 - International Organizations


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of the background organization, aims, activities, and accomplishments of the United Nations and its specialized agencies. A consideration of the factors affecting the success or failure of world organizations. Prerequisite: POLS 130 - Introduction to International Relations  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    △ POLS 358 - Contemporary Political Thought


    (3 S.H.)

    This is the third part of a three-part survey course on “The History of Political Thought” series offered in the department. This course studies major contemporary thinkers in the canon, such as Nietzsche, Foucault, Arendt, Camus, and Rawls. Offered every two years.
  
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    POLS 360 - American Congress


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the role of Congress in shaping policy and representing constituents. Topics include the organization of Congress, Congressional leadership, voting coalitions, and proposals for reform. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics .
  
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    POLS 390 - Comparing Politics in Developing Countries


    (3 S.H.)

    A comparative study of the political ideological, social, and economic development in selected Third World countries. Countries covered may vary each time the course is offered but will include examples from the African, Asian, and Latin American continents.  Meets GOAL 7. Prerequisite: POLS 135 - Comparative Political Systems  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    POLS 401 - Independent Readings in Political Science


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Readings in an area of political science of particular interest to the student. Credit arranged.
  
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    ◆ POLS 410 - Political Research Seminar


    (3 S.H.)

    Capstone experience that allows students to do original primary research using the various primary research tools and approaches used in the study of practical phenomena and processes. Emphasis is placed on problem-solving and critical thinking. Students have a capstone experience in which they apply knowledge gained in this and other courses to an original research problem. Survey research techniques are studied, and a practical survey project is undertaken. Prerequisite: ◆ POLS 280 - Introduction to Political Analysis . Offered yearly.
  
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    POLS 416 - Internship Program


    (1-12 S.H.)

    Provides practical experience in local, state, and national government and public administration (limited enrollment). Credit arranged. (Cannot apply toward a graduate degree. Only three credits count toward major.)
  
  
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    POLS 420 - Administrative Law


    (3 S.H.)

    An exploration of the law of the administrative process: legislative, executive, and judicial control of administrative action; the formal administrative process; and administrative discretion with due consideration to the Federal Administrative Procedure Act. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics  ; recommended prerequisite: POLS 320 - Constitutional Law .
  
  
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    POLS 422 - American Foreign Policy


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of contemporary United States foreign policy. The course includes an analysis of threats and issues originating from the external world and facing America, and the suitable American response, responsibilities, and commitments. Prerequisite: POLS 130 - Introduction to International Relations  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    △ POLS 425 - Policy Studies


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the evaluation of public policy in the United States. Students assess the process and substance of policy on various topics such as pollution, poverty, crime, illness, and violence. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics . Offered every two years.
  
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    POLS 426 - Politics of Public Budgeting


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the politics of budgeting at the state, local, and national level. Consideration is given to program planning, inter-governmental relations, the government and the economy, and reforms in budgetary systems. Prerequisites: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics  and POLS 228 - Public Service .
  
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    POLS 429 - Policy Reform


    (3 S.H.)

    Strategies and problems of making, implementing, and changing public policy. Discussion addresses policy stakeholders as they are involved in developing and reforming public policy. Prerequisite: POLS 120 - Introduction to American Politics . Offered every two years.
  
  
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    △ POLS 450 - Feminist Political Theory


    (3 S.H.)

    This course investigates different perspectives in feminist political thought. Students will consider psychological, Marxist, radical, liberal, utopian, and French Feminist arguments, in order to understand the ways that political theorists have wrestled with the question of woman/women. Offered every two years.
  
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    ◎ POLS 460 - North American Relations


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines the relations among the three countries of North America: Canada, Mexico, and the United States. The examination of these relations involves the applicable theories of regional cooperation and conflict with special emphasis on integration. The course will also develop an understanding of the evolution of the current state of relations among the three. Focus will be on trade relations, the institutions of NAFTA, security issues, migration, the potential of building a regional community (along political, social, and economic lines), citizen perceptions, and overall development. Prerequisite: POLS 130 - Introduction to International Relations  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    △ POLS 475 - Democratization and Its Challenges


    (3 S.H.)

    The emphasis of this course is on the wave of democratization that is sweeping the world and the challenges that the new democracies face in consolidating themselves. This course covers the theory of democracy and the institutional, cultural, and socio-economic challenges that countries face as they seek to make the transition from dictatorship to democracy. Prerequisite: POLS 135 - Comparative Political Systems  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    ◎ POLS 488 - Issues in International Politics


    (3 S.H.)

    The purpose of the course is to enable students to have an opportunity to discuss a variety of contemporary global issues, which may not be covered in a regular course such as terrorism, religious fundamentalism, human rights and state sovereignty, and ethno-nationalism. Topics vary from year to year, depending upon their prominence or the instructor’s judgment that they should receive consideration. Prerequisite: POLS 130 - Introduction to International Relations  or instructor’s permission. Offered every two years.
  
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    POLS 499 - Seminar


    (1-3 S.H.)

    The subject matter is arranged by the instructor before the course is offered. Students can repeat the course without limitation on the number of credits as long as the subject matter is different.

Professional Studies

  
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    PS 398 - Internship


    (3 S.H.)

    Internship for Professional Studies majors who have completed a minimum of 60 credit hours including at least 21 hours of upper-division credits. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. Grade only. Note: PS 398 and  PS 399 - Internship  may be combined up to a maximum of six credits.
  
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    PS 399 - Internship


    (3-6 S.H.)

    Internship for Professional Studies majors only who have completed a minimum of 60 credit hours including at least 21 hours of upper-division credits. Prerequisite: Departmental approval. P/NC only. PS 399 and PS 398 - Internship   may be combined up to a maximum of six credits.
  
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    REGC 490 - Seminar in Adult Education


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Leadership topics from an intrapersonal and interpersonal perspective on a variety of current issues in both the public and private sector. May be repeated when offered for different subject content and topic title.

Psychology

  
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    PSY 185 - Drugs and Human Behavior


    (3 S.H.)

    A broad, freshman-level introduction to issues surrounding drug use, properties of specific drugs, and drug policy in the United States. Online format during summer session. Offered yearly. Note: Credits not applicable to psychology electives.
  
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    PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science


    (3 S.H.)

    A broad introduction to psychology: the science of human behavior and mental processes, focusing on its questions, methods, research findings, theories, and applications. Meets GOAL 5. Offered each semester.
  
  
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    PSY 250 - Developmental Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of the patterns of change and stability in human behavior from conception to death. Theories and research pertaining to growth and change in physical, cognitive, personality, and social functioning across the life span are examined.  Meets GOAL 5. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    PSY 275 - Psychology of Gender


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of scientific research into gender-related differences in behavior, including implications for modern living. Topics include gender stereotypes; gender development/typing; gender comparisons in social, personality, and cognitive areas, education and work, love relationships, sexuality, mental and physical health issues and violence. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    PSY 298 - Health Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    Explores psychological factors in optimal maintenance of health, treatment of illness and recovery from or adjustment to ongoing health problems. Theories, research methods, and clinical applications from the biopsychosocial context as applied to health psychology are examined. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    PSY 301 - Introduction to Learning


    (3 S.H.)

    Behavioral, associative, and cognitive theories of learning and memory are reviewed. Topics include reinforcement, punishment, extinction, generalization, discrimination, observational learning, and motivation. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    PSY 303 - Brain and Behavior


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of how neuron physiology directs behavior. Topics include a discussion of functional neuroanatomy as applied to the study of emotion, consciousness, social behavior, feeding, and memory. Also includes a discussion of neurological and psychological disorders and the diseases of aging. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    PSY 305 - Theories of Personality


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of major theoretical perspectives. Personality theory, research, and assessment are considered from a variety of viewpoints including the psychodynamic, behavioral, dispositional, and phenomenological perspectives. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  
  
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    PSY 310 - Child Development


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will focus heavily on the developmental periods of infancy and middle childhood (roughly equivalent to prenatal through ages 10-11). The major domains of development—biological, cognitive, and social—will be covered in the course. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . PSY 250 - Developmental Psychology  is recommended, but not required. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    ◎ PSY 311 - Careers in Psychology


    (1 S.H.)

    An introduction to and examination of career options for students of psychology and related disciplines. Topics include job opportunities for those with a bachelor’s degree in psychology and how to prepare for and choose graduate programs. Prerequisites: 9 credit hours in psychology and either CMST 191 - Introduction to Public Speaking  or  . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    PSY 315 - Adolescent Development


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will focus heavily on the developmental period of adolescence and include some information from the developmental period of emerging adulthood (roughly equivalent to ages 12 to 18-25). The major domains of development—biological, cognitive, and social—will be covered in the course. The course will also cover issues related to psychosocial development (e.g., intimacy, achievement, problems during adolescence). Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . PSY 250 - Developmental Psychology  is recommended, but not required. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    PSY 325 - Social Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    Overview of theories and research in social psychology. Topics include social cognition, the self, stereotyping and prejudice, attitudes and persuasion, interpersonal relationships, and group behavior.  Meets GOAL 5. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    PSY 330 - Psychology and the Law


    (3 S.H.)

    Psychological analysis of the legal system, focusing on perception, memory, and decision-making processes by individuals in the system. Topics include eyewitnesses, expert witnesses, the identification and evaluation of suspects, jury trials, capital punishment, and current topics. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    PSY 335 - Human Factors Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of psychological principles applied to the relationship between technology and human capabilities in the design and operation of both human-machine systems and environments in which humans live, work, and play. Specific topics include human perceptual and motor capabilities, machine displays and controls, and workspace design. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
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    PSY 360 - Personnel Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    Analysis and review of applied psychology in the field of work including job analysis, personnel selection, performance evaluation, training design and evaluation, job design, human engineering, fatigue, safety and physical working conditions. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    PSY 369 - Cognitive Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    Contemporary scientific approaches to understanding human mental activity-the acquisition, storage, retrieval, and use of knowledge. Topics include pattern recognition, attention, memory, concept formation, language, imagery, reasoning, problem-solving, and decision-making. Both theory and applications to other disciplines and everyday life are addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    PSY 373 - Cross-Cultural Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    This course explores the impact of culture in human mental processes and behavior. Topics include enculturation, development, cognition, communication, motivation, emotion, identity, personality, and social behavior. Theory, research, applications, and implications for main stream psychology are addressed. Prerequisite:  .   and   are recommended but not required. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    PSY 400 - Independent Study or Research


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Independent study or research for credit under the guidance of a faculty member with prior permission. Can be repeated. Teaching assistantships and field experience may be available but only on a P/NC basis. Prerequisites: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science  and other requirements as determined by the instructor. Offered each semester.
  
  
  
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    PSY 410 - Sensation and Perception


    (3 S.H.)

    A careful consideration of how we come to know about our world through our senses. Emphasis on vision and audition, including clinical aspects. Also addresses taste, smell, and skin senses including pain. Both theory and applications to other disciplines and everyday life are addressed. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    PSY 418 - Behavioral Pharmacology


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of the psychological, sociological, and physiological factors related to pharmacological treatment of psychological disorders and chemical dependency. Additionally, a discussion of traditional medicine and drug development is included. This course does not meet teacher certification. It is designed for non-education majors. Prerequisites: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science  and PSY 303 - Brain and Behavior . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    PSY 420 - Abnormal Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    The origins, development, and treatment of abnormal behavior. Topics include mood, anxiety, and schizophrenic disorders as well as selected topics, which may include somatoform and dissociative disorders, life-span related disorders, substance use disorders, organic disorders, psychological aspects of illness, and prevention. Prerequisites: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science  and 3 additional S.H. in psychology. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  
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    PSY 425 - Organizational Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    An analytical survey of theory and research in organizational socialization, decision-making, motivation, leadership and the use of power and authority, communication, organizational change and development, and the evaluation of organizational effectiveness. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    PSY 430 - Forensic Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    A seminar examining issues at the intersection of clinical psychology and the legal system. Topics include criminal psychology, insanity and competency, risk assessment, the psychology of victims, issues involving children, civil law issues, and other current topics. Prerequisite: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . PSY 330 - Psychology and the Law  is recommended, but not required. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
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    PSY 433 - Neuroscience


    (4 S.H.)

    A survey of contemporary theories and research methods in neuroscience. Topics include a discussion of functional neuroanatomy as applied to the regulation of homeostasis, motor systems, cognitive processing, and a discussion of advanced topics in the areas of motor, neurological, and psychological disorders. Lecture and laboratory. Prerequisites: 9 S.H. in psychology including PSY 303 - Brain and Behavior  or 9 S.H. in biology. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  
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    PSY 498 - Seminar in Psychology


    (3 S.H.)

    A variable-topic course involving in-depth study of a specialized subject area within psychology. Can be repeated with different topics. Prerequisites: PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science  and other requirements as determined by the instructor. Grade only. Offered as available.

Recreation, Tourism and Therapeutic Recreation

  
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    ✽ RTTR 144 - Contemporary Activities


    (1 S.H.)

    This course introduces the student to varied contemporary, movements-based activities. A variety of activities will be introduced as a means of encouraging movement and expanding the student’s leisure interest profile. Note: Additional fee. May be repeated for credit under different subtitle.
  
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    RTTR 203 - Recreational Programming


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an introduction to recreational and sports programming and leadership concepts. Grade only.
  
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    RTTR 210 - Professional Development in Recreation, Tourism and Therapeutic Recreation


    (1 S.H.)

    Explores the array of professional opportunities through interaction with invited experts and experiential exercises. Prepares students for the profession by fulfilling volunteerism and professional organization requirements as well as the initial development of portfolios and resumes. Grade only.
  
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    RTTR 229 - Foundations of Recreation and Leisure Studies


    (3 S.H.)

    History and development of recreation, and principles, and philosophies of leisure. Modern-day concepts of leisure will also be addressed. Grade only.
 

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