Jul 07, 2022  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code,  Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Note:

◎= Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

 

Communication Studies

  
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    CMST 289 - Gender and Communication


    (3 S.H.)

    This course uses a cultural and theoretical approach to study gender identity and gendered communication styles. It explores the influence and media portrayal of gender in a variety of contexts including friendships, romantic relationships, families, healthcare and educational settings, and organizations. Topics may include the similarities and differences in interactions, language choice, nonverbal behavior, metaphors, and the interpretation of reality.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Offered yearly.


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    CMST 290 - Disability Communication and Culture


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an overview of communication-based research examining disability in interpersonal, organizational, health care, educational, and media contexts. The cultural perspectives of people with disabilities are explored in this class.  Meets GOAL 7. Offered every third semester.


    Course Registration

  
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    CMST 291 - Topics in Multicultural Communication


    (3 S.H.)

    Familiarizes students with the communication skills necessary to succeed in managing cultural differences and diversity among cultural groups in the United States. Topics have included communication ethics and diversity, African American rhetoric, and gay rhetoric. This course may be repeated with different topics.  Meets GOAL 7. Offered yearly.


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    CMST 292 - Multicultural U.S. Rhetoric


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of the rhetoric of a co-cultural group(s) in the United States from a rhetorical/cultural perspective. Each course will focus on a specific culture or a cross-cultural topic. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 7. Offered yearly. May be repeated for credit with different course topics.


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    CMST 296 - Fundamentals of Interviewing


    (3 S.H.)

    Learn and apply the effective communication skills and strategies used by interviewers and interviewees in employment, performance, appraisal, patient, survey and journalistic interview settings. This course is tailored to meet the professional needs of students who are in, or will be entering, the workplace. Offered yearly.


    Course Registration

  
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    CMST 321 - Conflict and Communication


    (3 S.H.)

    Use conflict principles and theories to analyze, manage, negotiate, mediate and resolve conflicts in interpersonal, group, intercultural and organizational settings.  Meets GOAL 5. Offered yearly.


    Course Registration

  
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    CMST 357 - Communication in Social Media


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines theories and practices of social media in communication contexts, such as relational, public, group and organizational. It provides an overview of different analytical and theoretical approaches to the study of social media that scholars have taken in the past, as well as surveying recent trends in social media development that will significantly affect communication in the future. Prerequisite:  CMST 282 - Introduction to Communication Studies  or instructor’s permission. Offered yearly.


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    CMST 369 - Leadership and Communication


    (3 S.H.)

    This course addresses theoretical models and applied principles of leadership across contexts, with an emphasis on communication skills and strategies for effectively executing leadership functions, managing emergent challenges and expanding leadership capacity. Attention is paid to rhetorical and behavioral adaptations based on personality differences and intragroup dynamics. Cultural differences in leadership style preferences are examined. This course is valuable for students who presently occupy a leadership role and/or envision themselves doing so in the future. Prerequisites:   or  . Junior or senior status recommended. Offered yearly.


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    CMST 381 - Advanced Intercultural Communication


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an in-depth study of intercultural communication theories. Students will investigate cultural processes influencing intercultural communication with a focus on U.S. co-cultures, and improving intercultural communication competency.  Meets GOAL 7. Prerequisites: CMST 281 - Intercultural Communication  or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered yearly. Note: This course was previously listed as Advanced Intercultural and International Communication.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    CMST 387 - Interpersonal Communication


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an advanced understanding of interpersonal communication theories, processes, functions and contexts. Attention will be given to the initiation, development, maintenance, repair, networking in, and disengagement from a variety of interpersonal relationships such as families, friendships, romantic partners, and workplace relationships. This course is valuable to professionals in fields such as communication consulting, counseling, social work, and health care. Prerequisites: CMST 191 - Introduction to Public Speaking , CMST 192 - Introduction to Speech Communication . Offered yearly.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    CMST 399 - Internship


    (1-12 S.H.)

    Students will study and participate in a supervised work experience designed by the CMST internship director, student, and site supervisor. Prerequisites: Departmental approval and a minimum major/minor GPA of 2.50. CMST majors or minors only. P/NC only; variable credit. Offered all semesters and summer sessions.


    Course Registration

  
  
  
  
  
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    CMST 499 - Independent Studies in CMST


    (1-6 S.H.)

    Offers advanced students an opportunity to study independently in an area of special interest to them. May be repeated for a total of 6 semester hours. A maximum of 3 semester hours may be applied toward electives in the major or minor. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered on demand.


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Composite Materials Engineering

  
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    CME 102 - Introduction to Engineering


    (2 S.H.)

    Overview of engineering and various engineering disciplines with emphasis on composite materials engineering, introductory hands-on experience with composites, elementary concepts of engineering science, ethical aspects of engineering, and safety and environmental issues regarding the use of chemicals. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 103 - Understanding Engineering (for non-majors)


    (2 S.H.)

    This course is for non-engineers who want to learn what it is like to be an engineer. The topics covered in this course include engineering design, ethics, intellectual property, personal and environmental safety, and principles of engineering. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 182 - Engineering Graphics and Design


    (2 S.H.)

    A lecture-laboratory course. Engineering design process. Visualization and design communication. Engineering drawing standards and conventions. Computer-aided drafting and design (CADD) software are used throughout the course. Sectional views, auxiliary views, dimensioning, tolerancing, and reading of drawings. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 210 - Computer Applications in Engineering


    (3 S.H.)

    A lecture-laboratory course. Formulate an overall solution algorithm and solve engineering and scientific problems utilizing spreadsheets and mathematical software. Topics include engineering and scientific problems that employ statistics, algebra, calculus, linear algebra, and optimization in their solutions. Use of computers as a mean for technical communication is stressed. Prerequisites: MATH 212 - Calculus I . Grade only.


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    CME 250 - Statics


    (3 S.H.)

    Force systems and equilibrium. Applications to simple trusses, frames and machines; distributed loads; properties of areas and masses; laws of friction. Designed to develop students’ ability to analyze and solve engineering problems. Prerequisites: MATH 212 - Calculus I  and PHYS 221 - University Physics I . Grade only.


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    CME 260 - Mechanics of Materials


    (3 S.H.)

    Concept of stress and strain, internal reactions (stresses and strains) to external load for axially loaded prismatic structural member; torsion members and beams; deformation and buckling of structural and machine elements. Statically determinate and statically indeterminate problems. Prerequisites:   and MATH 213 - Calculus II . Grade only.


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    △ CME 285 - Properties of Materials


    (4 S.H.)

    A lecture-laboratory course. Introduction to structure-property relationships of engineering materials. Classification of materials, atomic structure and bonding, crystal structures, imperfection in solids, stress-strain behavior and hardness of metals, phase diagrams, structure and properties of ceramics, polymer structures, stress-strain behavior of polymers, and corrosion of materials. Laboratory: crystal structures; X-ray diffraction; determination of tensile, hardness, microhardness, microstructure, and corrosion properties of metallic materials. Technical writing is an integral part of the course. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and CHEM 213 - Principles of Chemistry II . Grade only.


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    CME 300 - Thermodynamics


    (3 S.H.)

    Basic concepts, First and Second Law of Thermodynamics, properties and phase changes of pure substances, ideal gases, energy analysis of closed and open systems, enthalpy, entropy, reversibility, and Carnot and gas power cycles. Prerequisites: PHYS 222 - University Physics II . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 350 - Fluid Mechanics


    (3 S.H.)

    Pressure and flow measurements, hydrostatic force, continuity and momentum equations, flow in conduits, velocity distribution, drag force, pump calculations, and application of fluid flow in composite materials manufacturing. Prerequisites: ◆ MATH 313 - Differential Equations . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 360 - Introduction to Composite Materials


    (3 S.H.)

    Basic concepts and definitions of composite materials. Fabrication, structure, properties, and applications of fibrous materials. Structure and properties of polymer matrix, metal matrix, and ceramic matrix materials. Study of interface between fiber and matrix. Fabrication methods, properties and applications of polymer matrix composites, metal matrix composites, ceramic matrix composites, and carbon/carbon composites. Prerequisites: △ CME 285 - Properties of Materials  and credit or concurrent registration in CHEM 340 - Organic Chemistry Survey  or CHEM 410 - Polymer Chemistry . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 370 - Heat and Mass Transfer


    (3 S.H.)

    Conduction, convection and radiation, heat transfer and analysis of heat exchanger, Fick’s Law, molecular diffusion and convection. Prerequisites: CME 350 - Fluid Mechanics . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 390 - Composites Manufacturing


    (3 S.H.)

    A lecture-laboratory course. General manufacturing issues including flow of a product through a manufacturing firm, environmental, health and safety issues, and learning curve. Fabrication processes for polymeric and non-polymeric composite materials. Prerequisites: CME 360 - Introduction to Composite Materials . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    △ CME 394 - Polymer Science and Characterization


    (3 S.H.)

    A lecture-laboratory course. Investigate and determine thermal and physical properties of thermoplastics, thermosets, and their blends to get insight into their thermodynamic state and morphology. Correlate kinetics of cure to macroscopic behavior of thermosets. Theories discussed in the course include group contribution technique, polymer miscibility, and phase separation. Technical writing is an integral part of this course. Prerequisites: CHEM 340 - Organic Chemistry Survey  and △ CME 285 - Properties of Materials . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 401 - Engineering Economics


    (1 S.H.)

    Fundamentals of engineering economics. Topics include interest and time value of money; annual, discrete, and continuous compounding; rate of return, payback period, and investment alternatives. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 410 - Polymer Processing


    (3 S.H.)

    Chemical and physical properties of polymers, additives, mixing and compounding, rheology of polymer melts, continuity, energy, and momentum equations, qualitative description and quantitative modeling of extrusion, blow molding, thermoforming, injection molding, compression molding, and rotational molding processes. Environmental aspects of polymers. Prerequisites: CME 350 - Fluid Mechanics . Grade only. Offered a minimum of once every two years.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 420 - Manufacturing Systems Analysis


    (3 S.H.)

    Evolution of the manufacturing system. Functions and interactions in a manufacturing system. Analytical tools used in evaluating a manufacturing system. Simulation as a tool for analyzing a manufacturing system. Prerequisites: CME 390 - Composites Manufacturing . Grade only. Offered a minimum of once every two years.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 430 - Rheology


    (3 S.H.)

    A lecture-laboratory course. Stress and strain, Newtonian and non-Newtonian fluids, rheological equations of state, viscometric flows, viscoelasticity, fluid mechanics of rheometry, plastic melt and suspension rheology. Prerequisites: CME 350 - Fluid Mechanics . Grade only. Offered a minimum of once every two years.


    Course Registration

  
  
  
  
  
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    ◎ CME 475 - Design Project I


    (3 S.H.)

    Develop product from requirements definition through prototype fabrication. Includes definition of product requirements, development of product and tooling design, analysis, definition of fabrication process, development of quality assurance plan, fabrication of prototype, inspection and testing. Work is performed in student teams. Prerequisites: CME 390 - Composites Manufacturing . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 480 - Design Project II


    (3 S.H.)

    Develop product from requirements definition through prototype fabrication. Includes definition of product requirements, development of product and tooling design, analysis, definition of fabrication process, development of quality assurance plan, fabrication of prototype, inspection and testing. Work is performed in student teams. Prerequisites: ◎ CME 475 - Design Project I . Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 485 - Advanced Microscopic Techniques


    (3 S.H.)

    A lecture-laboratory course. Theory and application of scanning electron microscope. Overview of theory applications of selected current surface and microanalysis techniques including the atomic force microscope. Comparisons are made to optical microscopy. Theory and application of X-ray diffraction. Explores the relationships among chemistry, microscopic structure, and properties of engineering materials. Qualitative X-ray microanalysis of metal matrix composites. Emphasis on technical writing of laboratory reports. Prerequisites: CME 360 - Introduction to Composite Materials . Grade only. Offered a minimum of once every two years.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ CME 491 - A/B Engineering Seminar


    (1 S.H.)

    Varying topics seminar class. Students are required to give presentations on topics pertinent to engineering. Also includes guest speakers from engineering profession. Students must take 491A in order to receive credit for 491B. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    ◎ CME 491A - Engineering Seminar


    (0 S.H.)

    Varying topics seminar class. Students are required to give presentations on topics pertinent to engineering. Also includes guest speakers from the engineering profession. Students must take CME 491A in order to receive credit for ◎ CME 491B - Engineering Seminar . Grade only.


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    ◎ CME 491B - Engineering Seminar


    (1 S.H.)

    Varying topics seminar class. Students are required to give presentations on topics pertinent to engineering. Also includes guest speakers from the engineering profession. Students must take ◎ CME 491A - Engineering Seminar   in order to receive credit for CME 491B. Grade only.


    Course Registration

  
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    CME 499 - Independent Study


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Designed for the undergraduate student who wishes to engage in research. Subject and credit to be arranged with instructor. Requires the approval of the Department of Composite Materials Engineering. Grade only.


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Computer Science

  
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    CS 110 - Computers in a Global Society


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to help students become informed users to succeed in the technologically connected global society. This non-technical introductory course covers fundamental knowledge of, and proper use of, the various types of computers and computer networks. The impact and significance of the information age is explored in the context of economic, political, cultural, legal, environmental, historical, ergonomic, and psychological topics. The course emphasizes the risks to personal and organizational data and the security and privacy issues due to the extensive digitized information on networked computers. Discussion and illustrative format will be used to introduce topics such as: ethical use of computers, cyber security, privacy, civic responsibilities and cyber law, intellectual property rights and piracy. These topics will be explored to develop scientific and philosophical perspectives at local and global level..


    Course Registration

  
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    CS 115 - Computer Systems and Internet Technology


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with a broad overview of the principles of, and effective strategies for, navigating computer systems, servers and the Internet. Topics include file maintenance; operating systems; general applications (word processors, spread sheets, electronic presentations, databases); web-based applications; security; and multimedia. Emphasis will be placed on navigating systems in safe and effective ways as well as maintaining personal systems (desktops or laptops). Course does not count for major elective credit.


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    CS 116 - Web Technology I


    (3 S.H.)

    An introductory, hands-on course on Internet website development. The emphasis is for students to develop competence using web authoring tools and tools for incorporating multimedia into a web page in order to build a complex website focused on some area of academic interest. Students will learn how to plan and publish websites and develop electronic portfolios that are exciting, efficient, accessible, and well-designed. Students will gain insight into the technology behind the World Wide Web by working with CSS (cascading style sheets) and HTML (hypertext) markup language. No prior programming experience is necessary for this course.


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    CS 130 - Problem Solving with Computers


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed for non-majors to introduce programming and problem solving for mathematics. It provides students with an overview of the principles of computer program design, and leads students through a complete cycle of problem solving using computers. Students will develop programming projects to construct contemporary applications of mathematics. In programming, students learn to analyze the problem, formulate mathematical solution and actually implement it. The course introduces computational concepts such as data, sequence and objects, and their processing using iteration. No prior programming experience is necessary for this course.  Meets GOAL 4.


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    CS 150 - Exploring Mathematics through Computing


    (3 S.H.)

    Course is designed for non-majors who desire a survey of the field of computing/computer science. It includes studies of the mathematical/logical formulations of algorithms for problem solving. After a brief history of the development of computers, students are introduced to such fundamental issues as problem-solving, algorithm design, representation and analysis, logic design, computer organization, machine and assembly language, software design and analysis, various number representations and conversions, and mathematical models of computation. Meets GOAL 4. Prerequisites: Qualifying score on the mathematics placement exam or MATH 050 - Intermediate Algebra .


    Course Registration

  
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    CS 216 - Web Technology II


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is a continuation of the web technology concepts introduced in CS 116. Students will learn how to make their websites more dynamic while at the same time learning basic programming skills using the JavaScript programming language. Students should be familiar with HTML and CSS, but no other programming experience is necessary for this course. Prerequisites: CS 116 - Web Technology I .


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    CS 234 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving I


    (4 S.H.)

    An introduction to the major concepts of algorithm design and problem solving. Emphasis is on algorithm development, analysis, and refinement. Programming strategies and elements of programming also are covered. Various practical applications of problem-solving are demonstrated. Includes formal labs. Prerequisites: Qualifying score on the math placement test or MATH 050 - Intermediate Algebra .


    Course Registration

  
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    CS 240 - COBOL Programming and File Processing


    (4 S.H.)

    An in-depth study of structured program design utilizing the COBOL language. Topics include structured design, sequential and direct file processing, indexing, sorting, report writer and file organization. Emphasis is on sophistication, economy and efficiency of program design and execution. Prerequisite:  . CS major credit for only one of the two - CS 240 or CS 241 - will be given.


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    CS 241 - RPG Programming


    (4 S.H.)

    An in-depth study of structured program design utilizing the RPG language. Topics include structured design, sequential and direct file processing, indexing, sorting, report writer and file organization. Emphasis is on sophistication, economy and efficiency of program design and execution. Prerequisite:  . CS major credit for only one of the two - CS 240 or CS 241 - will be given.


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    CS 275 - Mathematical Foundations of Algorithms


    (4 S.H.)

    The formal study of the mathematical foundations of algorithms. This course provides students with an algorithm-based introduction to discrete mathematical structures and their application to computer science. Topics include sets, relations, graphs, proof techniques, induction, recursive definitions, and recurrence relations. Applications include the correctness and complexity of algorithms. This course is equivalent to MATH 275. Students may receive credit for either CS 275 or MATH 275, not both. Prerequisites: CS 234 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving I  and MATH 120 - Precalculus , or instructor’s permission.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    CS 299 - Special Topics


    (1-3 S.H.)

    This course is intended to treat “special” topics at the sophomore level. This course will be offered in response to requests from local groups or industry. This course may not be used to meet major or minor requirements. May be repeated for credit. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission.


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    CS 310 - Social Implications of Computing


    (3 S.H.)

    Course provides an overview of the societal and ethical issues surrounding computer technology and involves students in discussions about the social implications of this technology. Primary topics include professional ethics; privacy; intellectual property; computer and network security; computer reliability; work and wealth; and the societal impacts of computing, networking, and information storage and retrieval. Although the course is not a programming course, topics will be covered at a level that requires understanding of computer programming. The course will involve extensive reading, writing, and discussion. Prerequisites: CS 250  and ENG 111 .


    Course Registration

  
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    CS 313 - Networking and Telecommunications


    (3 S.H.)

    This course studies telecommunications and computer networks. It begins by discussing data communications, computer interfaces, transmission media, and error detection and correction. Wide area, metropolitan, and local area networks are studied in the context of the International Standards Organization/OSI Model. Emphasis is placed on the physical, data link, network, transport, and session layers. Prerequisites: CS 250 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving II  and one 300-level CS course.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    CS 344 - Introduction to Web Programming


    (3 S.H.)

    Focus is on the fundamentals of the Web as a computer system, and the components used in developing client-side web-based applications. Topics include markup languages (HTML and its variants), scripting languages (e.g., JavaScript, Perl, PHP), applets including security and digital signatures, multimedia content, animation, and usability issues. In addition, the course will provide an overview of web history, web architecture, search engines, and web security. Students will develop a number of web pages and programs throughout the course and work with a team to develop an integrated, interactive website. Prerequisites: CS 250 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving II  or instructor’s permission.


    Course Registration

  
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    CS 345 - Mobile Application Development


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is a mini-capstone in object-oriented development, reinforcing fundamental concepts from CS 234 and CS 250 and introducing advanced programming concepts including memory management and the model-view-controller design pattern. In addition, design considerations for mobile devices are discussed including utilizing the touch interface, programming for multiple devices, and programming with limited resources. New development tools are introduced including a new object oriented development language and a new IDE. Students are also asked to make extensive use of the available API. Prerequisite: CS 250 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving II .


    Course Registration

  
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    CS 366 - Topics in Emerging Computing Technologies


    (1-3 S.H.)

    This course is a topics course that is focused on emerging computing technologies. Topics may include computer gaming, data exchange and integration, social computing, mobile computing, robotics, etc. Students will gain exposure to these technologies to enrich their study in the field of computer science. Case studies will be used to connect computer science concepts to real-world problems. Prerequisites: CS 250 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving II  or instructor’s permission. Offered according to demand. May be repeated for credit.


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    CS 368 - Introduction to Bioinformatics


    (4 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the fundamental concepts of bioinformatics. Topics include introduction to DNA machinery and informatics, pairwise sequence alignments, bioinformatics programming, bioinformatics tools and database searches, phylogenetics analysis, genomics and proteomics, and introduction to DNA microarray analysis, sequencing techniques and algorithms. Advanced topics such as systems biology and HMM will be introduced as necessary. Prerequisites: CS 250 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving II  and BIOL 241 - Basics of Life .


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    CS 369 - Spatial Information Processing


    (3 S.H.)

    An introductory course on spatial data processing. The emphasis is for students to understand the major phases of the spatial information processing cycle, including selecting an appropriate algorithm, collecting and analyzing data, and presenting the results. Applications of information technology in the fields of geographic information processing and/or bioengineering will be examined. Prerequisites: CS 250 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving II  and MATH 212 - Calculus I  or instructor’s permission.


    Course Registration

  
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    CS 375 - Computer Systems


    (4 S.H.)

    This course is an overview of the hardware and software of computer systems. Topics include computer organization and computer architecture, data representation, assembly language, memory systems, operating systems, networking and security, run-time environments, and advanced topics such as RISC vs. CISC, non von Neumann architectures, and Java virtual machine. Prerequisites: CS 250 - Algorithms and Problem-Solving II .


    Course Registration

  
  
  
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    CS 399 - Special Topics


    (1-3 S.H.)

    This course is intended to treat “special” topics at the junior level. It is anticipated that this course will be offered in response to requests from local groups or industry. This course may not be used to meet major or minor requirements. Prerequisite: instructor’s permission. May be repeated for credit.


    Course Registration

  
  
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    △ CS 410 - Software Engineering


    (3 S.H.)

    The course deals with the current trends of software engineering principles and techniques for methodical construction of large, complex software-intensive systems. It follows the software life cycle from the requirement, specification, design, and testing phases. Topics include software process, project management, quality assurance, configuration management, formal specification techniques, design methodologies, testing and validation techniques, and object-oriented methodologies. Students are involved in a team project utilizing software engineering principles. Prerequisites: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures  and ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing .


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    ◎ CS 411 - Software Testing


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to various software testing techniques and analysis that have sound theoretical basis. Class discussion will include software testing fundamentals and techniques for software test case design. Software testing methods such as functional testing, structural testing, mutation testing, and integration and system testing, including object-oriented software testing will be presented. Prerequisites: △ CS 410 - Software Engineering  and CMST 191 - Introduction to Public Speaking .


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    CS 413 - Advanced Networking and Telecommunications


    (3 S.H.)

    Advanced topics in computer networking are studied. Emphasis is on the TCP/IP protocol and topics such as security, common network applications, and network management. The course emphasizes an advanced lab where students build a network, learn how to use network management tools, and write network applications. Prerequisites: CS 313 - Networking and Telecommunications  and CS 375 - Computer Systems .


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    CS 415 - Principles of Programming Languages


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the principles of the design and implementation of higher-level programming languages. Topics include syntax, semantics, implementation issues, and specific features and strengths of languages. Alternative paradigms for describing computation are also covered. Students are introduced to the theoretical foundations of these paradigms and are given an opportunity to write programs in each of the paradigms. Prerequisites: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures .


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    CS 420 - Computer Architecture


    (3 S.H.)

    Models of computing systems are studied. These include the Von Neumann model, multiprocessors, vector processors, and others. Additionally, the components of these models are examined. Topics include the memory hierarchy, input/output systems, and pipelining. Prerequisites: CS 375 - Computer Systems .


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    CS 423 - Computer and Network Security


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will provide an overview of computer and network security. It will cover topics such as availability, authentication, authorization, confidentiality, message and data integrity and non-repudiation. It will provide an introduction to application security from a programmer’s perspective and an overview of the cryptographic tools that help us solve some of these problems. Prerequisites: a grade of C or better in CS 313 - Networking and Telecommunications  or CS 375 - Computer Systems .


    Course Registration

  
  
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    CS 430 - Computer Graphics


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of computer graphics theories, algorithms, and techniques. Topics include display techniques, primitives and attributes, interactive graphics, transformations, 3-D modeling and viewing, graphics package design, picture structure, lighting and shading, and color theory. Prerequisite: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures .


    Course Registration

  
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    CS 433 - Digital Image Processing


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of digital images and their properties as well as algorithms and techniques for digital image processing. Topics include image acquisition, enhancement in both spatial and frequency domains, segmentation, and compression. Offers an introduction to object recognition approaches. Prerequisites: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures  and MATH 213 - Calculus II .


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    CS 440 - Theory of Algorithms


    (3 S.H.)

    Concepts and techniques of design efficiency and complexity of algorithms. Topics include principles of algorithm design (divide and conquer, backtracking, dynamic programming, greedy and local search); graph, numerical, pattern matching, and parallel algorithms; P, NP, and NP-complete problems. CS credit will be given for only one of these courses: CS 440 or CS 469 - Algorithms in Geographic Information Technology . Prerequisites: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures .


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    CS 445 - Artificial Intelligence


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of the tools and theoretical constructs of artificial intelligence as implemented on computers. Emphasis is on the importance of good representations to model various kinds of intelligence. Topics include resolution theorem proving, heuristic and algorithmic search, game playing, natural language processing, expert systems, and neural networks. Prerequisites: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures .


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    CS 465 - Topics: Computing Theory


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Topics are selected from automata theory, the Turing Machine, combinatorics, etc. An in-depth view of a specific concept of computing is covered. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and instructor’s permission. Offered according to demand. May be repeated for credit.


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    CS 466 - Topics: General Computing Applications


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Topics are selected from general computing application areas. An in-depth view of a specific problem or technique is given. Topics may include statistical problems, the Simplex model, O/1 knapsack, Divide and Conquer, etc. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and instructor’s permission. Offered according to demand. May be repeated for credit.


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    CS 467 - Topics: Information Systems Applications


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Topics are selected from specific information systems or management information systems applications and are oriented toward the user. Topics include linear programming, statistical packages, inventory systems, decision support, the transportation problem, project scheduling, queuing models, forecasting, and discrete simulation. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing and instructor’s permission. Offered according to demand. May be repeated for credit.


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    CS 469 - Algorithms in Geographic Information Technology


    (3 S.H.)

    The design and analysis of contemporary algorithms and their applications to geographic information technology. This course offers an exposition of the algorithmic principles driving advances in this application field. Data modeling, algorithm design techniques such as backtracking and divide-and-conquer, and machine learning algorithms are discussed in the context of the application field. CS credit will be given for only one of these courses: CS 440 - Theory of Algorithms  or CS 469. Prerequisites: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures , and CS 369 - Spatial Information Processing .


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    △ CS 470 - System Design with CASE/Tools


    (3 S.H.)

    System design with CASE tools: Analysis of Computer Information Systems, system life cycle, translation of a logical design with E-R diagrams, data flow diagrams, data dictionary and algorithm descriptions into a physical system design. Students work in small groups using CASE tools to design and generate the code for a system project. Prerequisite: CS 240 or CS 241 and  . Offered yearly.


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    ◎ CS 471 - Object Oriented Design and Development


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will cover fundamental topics in object-oriented analysis, design, and development. An object-oriented design methodology and tool will be introduced and used. The course will use an object oriented development environment/language. Advanced features of object-oriented languages will be covered. Students will be required to investigate issues in object-oriented systems and their implementation. Prerequisites: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures  and CMST 191 - Introduction to Public Speaking .


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    CS 472 - Reusable Software Architectures


    (3 S.H.)

    This course investigates the software concepts that promote reuse of software architectures. In particular, the influence of object technology on software design and reuse is studied. Domain modeling methods, which model the application domain as a software product family from which target systems can be configured, are investigated. The course also covers reusable software patterns including architecture patterns and design patterns, software components, and object-oriented frameworks. State-of-the-art component technologies will be used to experiment with the concepts of this course. Prerequisites: ◎ CS 471 - Object Oriented Design and Development  or instructor’s permission.


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    CS 476 - Distributed Systems: Concepts and Design


    (3 S.H.)

    Introduction to the theory and design principles used in the construction of distributed computer systems. Study of architectural foundations of networked systems, file servers and transportation handling, and security issues. Case studies of specific distributed systems. Prerequisites: CS 405 - Operating Systems .


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    CS 481 - Computer Applications


    (1-3 S.H.)

    This is intended to be an off-campus course. The computer applications to be covered are determined by the requesting group or company in conjunction with the computer science faculty. (Not open to computer science majors/minors.) Offered according to demand. May be repeated for credit.


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