Oct 22, 2021  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code,  Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Note:

◎= Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

 

Recreation, Tourism and Therapeutic Recreation

  
  •  

    ✽ RTTR 239 - Outdoor Pursuits


    (3 S.H.)

    An overview of the theory and practice of adventure/challenge education. Processing skills included. Classroom as well as experiential involvement. Challenge by choice philosophy. Additional fee. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 240 - Outdoor Pursuits II


    (3 S.H.)

    Use of the environment for year-round adventure recreation activities and learning of advanced camping/canoeing and/or kayaking and/or rafting skills. Several day- to month-long camping experiences. Additional fee. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 244 - Stewardship of Self and the Environment: Building a Principled Way of Life


    (3 S.H.)

    Students will explore and critically analyze information from popular culture and research sources to assist in the development of their affective, psychomotor, and cognitive domains as described by Bloom. Students will also investigate their social selves by comparing themselves to selected role models. Students will have the opportunity to critically analyze themselves while developing a slogan, motto, mission, goals, and objectives to assist with their sustainable journey through the university environment. Students will chart themselves to determine the extent to which they become contributing sustainable members of the campus and the surrounding community. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 245 - Therapeutic Recreation and Services


    (3 S.H.)

    History, philosophy, theories, and professionalism of therapeutic recreation. Factors influencing service delivery and models of service delivery will also be addressed. Grade only.
  
  •  

    ✽ RTTR 246 - Leisure Education in Therapeutic Recreation


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces leisure education as a process whereby students will “recognize leisure as an avenue for personal satisfaction and enrichment, become familiar with an array of leisure opportunities, understand the impact leisure has on society, and make decisions regarding their own leisure behavior.” (Zeyen, Odum & Lacaster, 1977). Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 265 - Leisure in Different Cultures


    (3 S.H.)

    The purpose of this course is to introduce students to different cultures through travel study. Applies only to travel education programs offered through RTTR and the ADVT minor. Repeatable for credit when students enroll in different travel/study programs. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 290 - Foundations of Tourism


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will explore the tourism system and expose the students to the delineations of tourists and tourism enterprises, travel trends, governmental and non-governmental roles, transportation providers, and destination services and attractions. Attention will also be given to the impacts of tourism. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 302 - Adventure Travel and Tourism Development


    (3 S.H.)

    An overview of the rapidly growing adventure tourism industry, and its relation to the field of recreation and leisure studies. Course emphasis will be placed on adventure tourism and national and international “eco-tourism,” which promotes cultural and environmental sensitivity. Grade only. Field trip is an additional fee.
  
  
  •  

    RTTR 332 - Leisure and Aging in Therapeutic Recreation


    (3 S.H.)

    Leisure needs and perceptions of the elderly. Implications for therapeutic recreation services in clinical and community settings. Prerequisite: RTTR 245 - Therapeutic Recreation and Services . Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 339 - Wilderness Ethics, Safety, and Survival


    (3 S.H.)

    Students will examine the elements of ethical wilderness trip planning, low impact activities, and select appropriate gear and equipment for trip safety. Survival and rescue skills will also be examined in this course. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 342 - Intervention Techniques in Therapeutic Recreation


    (3 S.H.)

    Helping strategies, processes and techniques utilized by the therapeutic recreation specialist. Prerequisite: RTTR 245 - Therapeutic Recreation and Services . Grade only.
  
  
  •  

    RTTR 370 - Festival and Special Event Planning


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the details of festival and special event planning, implementation, and evaluation from the perspective of the recreation and/or tourism professional. Following an introduction to concepts of special event/festival planning, implementation, and evaluation, students become experientially involved with the critical analysis of a special event or festival. Student analysis of the assigned special event/festival will integrate all phases of the recreation experience (anticipation, travel to, the experience itself, travel from, and recollection). Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 380 - Commercial Recreation


    (3 S.H.)

    Principles and procedures related to the development and operation of recreation, tourism, resort, and outdoor adventure commercial enterprises. This course prepares the student to conduct feasibility studies within the leisure services industry and to learn the functions of day-to-day operations required to maintain a profitable recreation enterprise. Prerequisite: RTTR 203 - Recreational Programming  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 390 - Tourism Planning


    (3 S.H.)

    Tourism planning involves maximizing benefits and minimizing negative impacts for local and regional tourism destinations. Student will be exposed to and understand positive and negative impacts of tourism; the need for resource inventories; the matching of resources with particular visitors, superstructure, and infrastructural needs; and the service quality necessary for visitor satisfaction and repeat visitation. Grade only. Offered on travel study program only.
  
  •  

    ◆ RTTR 393 - Evaluation in Recreation, Tourism, and Therapeutic Recreation


    (3 S.H.)

    The procedures and applications of social science research and evaluation methods are applied to recreation settings. Course content includes design, methods of data collection, interpretation, and presentation of the data. Emphasis is given to evaluation techniques used by recreation professionals. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 396 - Leadership and Group Dynamics: An Experiential Education Approach


    (3 S.H.)

    As a member of a travel study group for an extended period of time, participants in this experientially based course will have a rich opportunity to observe, apply, synthesize, and reflect upon readings and personal experiences pertinent to leadership and group dynamics issues. Grade only. Offered on travel study programs only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 397 - Internship in Recreation and Tourism


    (1-12 S.H.)

    The application of skill, knowledge and concepts necessary for assessing, planning, conducting and evaluating Recreation and Tourism programs. Permission and 2.50 GPA overall as it appears on the DARS (Degree Audit Reporting System) report at the end of the semester preceding the internship experience. Interns must complete a 12 or 15 consecutive week, 480 or 600 hour placement under the supervision of a qualified Recreation or Tourism specialist. Prerequisite: Senior standing in the RT major and completion of Recreation core courses or instructors permission. P/NC only. Offered fall, spring and summer terms.
  
  
  •  

    RTTR 399 - Internship in Therapeutic Recreation


    (1-12 S.H.)

    The application of skill, knowledge and concepts necessary for assessing, planning, conducting and evaluating individualized and group Therapeutic Recreation programs. Permission and 2.50 GPA overall as it appears on the DARS (Degree Audit Reporting System) report at the end of the semester preceding the internship experience. Therapeutic Recreation interns must complete 15 (or more) consecutive week, 600 hour placements under the supervision of a qualified, Certified Therapeutic Recreation Specialist. Prerequisite: Senior standing in the TR major and completion of recreation and therapeutic recreation core courses or instructors permission. P/NC only. Offered fall, spring and summer terms.
  
  •  

    RTTR 412 - Independent Study in Recreation, Tourism or Therapeutic Recreation


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Opportunity to work independently. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, preparation of proposed outline, and major advisor’s permission. Grade only. Repeatable for credit up to three times.
  
  
  •  

    RTTR 417 - Special Topics in Recreation, Tourism or Therapeutic Recreation


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Typically offered on a workshop basis. Subject matter determined by department. Course may be repeated when offered with different subject matter, content, and title. Grade only. Note: Additional fee.
  
  •  

    RTTR 421 - Outdoor Education and Interpretive Services


    (3 S.H.)

    Exploration of the out-of-doors as a medium to enhance cognitive, affective, and psychomotor learning for persons of all ages. Outdoor recreation as a component of outdoor education is also addressed. Grade only.
  
  
  •  

    RTTR 450 - Travel Study in Costa Rica


    (2 S.H.)

    This course focuses on student-based field research to assist the municipalities of Playa Dominical and Playa Uvita to develop their natural resources, tourism products, and associated services. Students will engage in inventorying natural resources, gathering data about tourism demand and supply, and constructing a database to help local officials make better tourism-related decisions. Prior to the study, students will be exposed to basic tourism and natural resources development concepts that have applications in Playa Dominical and Playa Uvita. Post-study work will focus on report development and the assessment of other tourism products and services in Costa Rica. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission and concurrent enrollment in GEOS 450 - Travel Study in Costa Rica . Grade only.
  
  •  

    RTTR 468 - Programming in Therapeutic Recreation


    (3 S.H.)

    An overview of assessment related to, and programming for, functional limitations commonly associated with various diseases and/or disabling conditions. Therapeutic recreation program assessment, development, implementation, evaluation and modification considerations. Prerequisites: Sophomore or preferably higher standing, RTTR 229 - Foundations of Recreation and Leisure Studies , and RTTR 245 - Therapeutic Recreation and Services  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  

Rochester Education

  
  •  

    RED 301 - Development Theories


    (1 S.H.)

    The Development: Culture(s) & Student Learning block is a 4-course sequence where teacher candidates explore theories, individuals, communities, and themselves. This is the first course in the series focusing on developmental theories that explain student learning. Teacher candidates will interact with both classic and contemporary theories of child development and learning. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    RED 302 - Diverse Learners/Human Relations


    (3 S.H.)

    The Development: Culture(s) & Student Learning block is a 4-course sequence where teacher candidates explore theories, individuals, communities, and themselves. This is the second course in the series focusing on understanding the child’s lifeworlds. Prerequisites:   and   . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
  
  •  

    RED 310 - STEM in the Elementary Classrooms


    (8 S.H.)

    The STEM semester block investigates relationships between and amongst science, technology, engineering, and mathematics. In particular, focusing upon how to facilitate learning experiences through which students utilize mathematics to mediate a developing understanding of science, technology, and engineering concepts. Prerequisite: Admission to the Rochester Education Teacher Program. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
  
  •  

    RED 401 - Kid-Watching


    (1 S.H.)

    This is the first course in a series focusing on describing and documenting student development and learning. Teacher candidates will develop observation and interviewing skills and assume the role of teacher as researcher. Grade only.
  
  •  

    RED 402 - Data Collect, Interpret, Use


    (1 S.H.)

    The Data-Wise: Assessment & Student Learning block is a 4-course sequence where teacher candidates examine the use of data to measure, understand, and improve student learning. This is the second course in the series focusing on using student assessment results to improve teaching and learning in the classroom. Teacher candidates will develop their skills with a variety of assessment tools and practices to plan and evaluate effective instruction. Teacher candidates will assume the role of teacher as researcher. Prerequisites:   and  . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
  
  •  

    RED 410 - STEM Clinical Practice: Collaborations, Instruction & Student Learning


    (1 S.H.)

    The Clinical Practice: Collaboration, Instruction, and Student Learning block is a 4-course sequence through which teacher candidates address what it means to be a Professional Educator. Four topics will be explored throughout the duration of the 3-course sequence. Topic 1 focuses on the classroom as a cultural community. Topic 2 explores the nature of reflective practice. Topic 3 examines the dynamics of community collaboration. Topic 4 centers on the relationship between research and practice. Prerequisites: Admission to the Rochester Teacher Education Program. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
  
  
  

Science Education

  
  •  

    SCIE 201 - Investigative Science I: Physical Science in Your Environment


    (4 S.H.)

    An integrated science experience designed specifically for elementary education majors.  Inquiry-based exploration of chemical and physical characteristics of nature in the regional and global community.  Focus on development of pre-service student pedagogical content knowledge and connections to state and national science education standards as relates to teaching science in elementary schools.  Field trips required.  Meets GOAL 3. Lecture and laboratory combined. Field trips required. Offered every semester.
  
  •  

    SCIE 203 - Investigative Science III: Scientific Investigation of Your Environment


    (4 S.H.)

    An integrated science experience designed specifically for elementary education majors. Inquiry-based laboratory and field exploration of biological and geological characteristics of our environment in the regional and global community as well as the problems facing the environment. Focus on development of pre-service student pedagogical content knowledge and connections to state and national science education standards as relates to teaching science in elementary schools. Field trips required. Enrollment limited to elementary education majors.  Meets GOAL 3. Lecture and laboratory combined. Prerequisites: SCIE 201 - Investigative Science I: Physical Science in Your Environment . Offered every semester as needed.
  

Social Work

  
  •  

    ◎ SOCW 340 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare


    (3 S.H.)

    This course looks at the profession of social work and U.S. social welfare policy, both historically and in the present. Pre-requisite:  . Grade only. Offered Fall and Spring semester on Winona and Rochester campuses. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 350 - Field Experience I


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with an experience in a human service agency through 120 hours of volunteer service. Students regularly journal experiences to reflect on their respective placements. Pre-requisite or corequisite: ◎ SOCW 340 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare . P/NC only. Note: Note: All field courses require an additional fee to cover malpractice liability insurance. Limited enrollment. May be taken twice for credit.
  
  •  

    SOCW 355 - Multicultural Issues


    (3 S.H.)

    This course prepares participants to critically examine salient multicultural issues in our community and society. Students will acquire a foundational understanding of key concepts including culture, multiculturalism, assimilation, pluralism, citizenship, immigration, and refugee status. They will also gain appreciation for how these concepts reflect global processes and impact community members’ lives and society. Offered spring semester and summer on the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 360 - Experiencing Mexican Cultures


    (3 S.H.)

    This course uses a comparative historical approach and experiential learning to provide students an intimate understanding of Mexican cultures and cultural diversity and the ability to critically apply acquired knowledge to life in their home communities. Corequisite: SOCW 361 - Mexican Social Services . Note: Limited enrollment. May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    SOCW 361 - Mexican Social Services


    (3 S.H)

    This course uses experiential and service learning to provide students with an intimate understanding of Mexican social service systems through the lenses of Mexican cultures. Comparative analyses enable students to grasp the importance of cultures in developing and applying effective social service interventions across diverse populations. Corequisite: SOCW 360 - Experiencing Mexican Cultures . Note: Limited enrollment. May be repeated for credit.
  
  •  

    SOCW 362 - Migration Policy


    (3 S.H.)

    This travel study course is intended to provide participants unique insight into migration between Mexico and the United States by developing a foundational academic understanding of migration processes and policy and by providing opportunities to analyze current social issues through exchanges with U.S. and Mexican policy-makers, academic experts, migrant advocates, migrant service providers, members of communities affected by migration, families of migrants, and migrants. May be repeated once for an additional three credits. Note: Limited enrollment. May be repeated once for an additional three credits.
  
  •  

    SOCW 365 - Social Work Practice I - Ethics and Interviewing


    (3 S.H.)

    The first of three practice courses to prepare students as generalist practitioners able to provide services and intervene for change at all systems levels. Values, ethics, and interviewing skills with diverse populations stressed. Prerequisite: Admission to the social work major. Grade only. Offered each semester on the Winona campus; annually on the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 370 - Human Behavior and the Social Environment


    (3 S.H.)

    This course offers an introduction to systems theory in understanding human behavior. The major focus is the theoretical perspectives of human behavior in the social environment and the relationships of these to social work practice intervention. Prerequisite: Admission to the social work major. Limited to 25 students. Grade only. Offered each semester on the Winona campus; offered annually on the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    △ SOCW 380 - Social Welfare Policy


    (3 S.H.)

    American social welfare policy has shaped the nature of income maintenance, health, education, employment, and housing in the U.S. Concepts of equality, adequacy, and efficiency as well as dignity and community are used to evaluate the nature and structure of social welfare policies. Prerequisite: Admission to the social work major or instructor’s permission. Limited to 25 students. Grade only. Offered each semester on the Winona campus; offered annually on the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 385 - Social Work Practice II - Families and Groups


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is a continuation of Social Work Practice I ( SOCW 365 - Social Work Practice I - Ethics and Interviewing ). It looks at generalist practice skills needed in assessment and to affect change utilizing a strengths perspective. Students learn to utilize these skills working with groups, families, and individuals of different backgrounds and cultures. Prerequisites: SOCW 365 - Social Work Practice I - Ethics and Interviewing  and admission to the social work major. Grade only. Offered each semester on the Winona campus; offered annually on the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  
  •  

    SOCW 400 - Practicum Preparation


    (4 S.H.)

    This course aims to facilitate students’ preparation for the practicum experience. The course includes development of interview skills, resumé building, selection of a practicum placement site, development of a learning contract, and preparation of a capstone research project. Prerequisites: Admission to the social work major and completion of (or in the process of completing) all coursework for graduation except the Practicum and Seminar ( SOCW 475 - Social Work Senior Practicum ). Grade only. Grade only. Offered each semester on the Winona campus; annually on the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    ◆ SOCW 410 - Analysis of Social Welfare Policy


    (3 S.H.)

    The focus of this course is the ideology and content of social welfare policy, the process by which it is developed, its implications for social work practitioners at all levels, and methods of affecting change. Prerequisites: Admission to the social work major and successful completion of △ SOCW 380 - Social Welfare Policy . Grade only. Offered each semester on the Winona campus; offered annually on the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 415 - Social Work Practice III - Organizations and Communities


    (3 S.H.)

    This is the final of the practice courses designed to prepare students as generalist practitioners able to provide services to client systems at all levels. The focus of this course is on the evaluation and termination processes of planned change, crisis intervention, and macro skills of intervention. Prerequisites: Admission to the social work major and successful completion of SOCW 385 - Social Work Practice II - Families and Groups . This course is taken concurrently with SOCW 400 - Practicum Preparation . Grade only. Grade only. Offered each semester on the Winona campus; offered annually on the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 420 - Child Welfare


    (3 S.H.)

    This course looks at the problems vulnerable children face and the skills, policies, and programs needed to serve them. Prerequisite: ◎ SOCW 340 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare  or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered Fall semester in Rochester and Spring semester in Winona. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 425 - Law and Social Work


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is an overview of the law, the legal system, the hearing process, and the role of social workers in the legal arena. Prerequisite: ◎ SOCW 340 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare  or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Course is not offered on a yearly basis. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 430 - Aging: Policies and Services


    (3 S.H.)

    This course covers the problems faced by elders and the policies and programs created to help elders. Prerequisite: ◎ SOCW 340 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare  or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered annually on Winona campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 435 - Social Work Practice with Diverse Populations


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to introduce social work students to the field of social work and diverse populations. This course focuses on social work practice with individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities with an emphasis on transcultural practice. Variables of race, ethnicity, gender, class, and sexual orientation are all considered as they relate to generalist social work practitioners. This course will examine individual and institutional racism, sexism, classism, and homophobia. Prerequisite: ◎ SOCW 340 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare . Grade only. Offered annually in Winona campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 440 - Variable Topics in Social Work


    (1-6 S.H.)

    A seminar course that analyzes topics and problems from the social work perspective. (Topics will be chosen by the instructor and announced before registration.) Grade only.
  
  •  

    SOCW 445 - Globalization of Social Welfare


    (3 S.H.)

    This course challenges the dominant paradigms that shape our increasingly small world. Examines the social consequences of international economic development and trade policies in social welfare and practice, and what can be done to prevent the erosion of the quality of life in our communities as a result of economic globalization. The course presents alternative paradigms for international and community economic development and suggests some of the roles for social work professionals as facilitators and partners in projects and processes of community empowerment across the globe. This course meets the University Studies unity and diversity global perspectives requirement. Prerequisite: ◎ SOCW 340 - Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare . Grade Only. Offered annually in Winona campus. Note: Limited enrollment.
  
  •  

    SOCW 450 - Independent Studies in Social Work


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Intended to aid the student who has a special area of interest that goes beyond formal course limits. By arrangement. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOCW 460 - Special Projects in Social Work


    (1-3 S.H.)

    For the student interested in pursuing an independent research project in social work. By arrangement. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOCW 475 - Social Work Senior Practicum


    (12 S.H.)

    Field placement in selected social service agencies under professional instruction. Includes the development and completion of a learning contract and a research project. Prerequisite: Satisfactory completion of all coursework required in the social work major and successful placement at an approved social service agency through  . Corequisite: To be taken concurrently with △ SOCW 480 - Integrative Social Work Seminar . Limited enrollment. Pass or no credit only. Offered each semester in Winona and Spring semester and Summer on the Rochester campus. Note: Note: All field courses require an additional fee to cover malpractice liability insurance. 
  
  •  

    △ SOCW 480 - Integrative Social Work Seminar


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides the opportunity for students to integrate social work theory with the external world through in-depth discussions of their practice experiences and research projects. Corequisite: To be taken concurrently with SOCW 475 - Social Work Senior Practicum  . Grade only. Offered each semester and summer in the Rochester campus. Note: Limited enrollment.

Sociology

  
  •  

    SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to sociology as a social science concerned with the systematic study of human society; consideration of individuals, groups, and relationships. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 7. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOC 205 - Social Interaction


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of human interactions and relations among people, how social situations affect behavior, how people acquire the ability to interact as members of society, and the methods used to study human interaction.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 7. Recommended prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOC 212 - Sociology of Families


    (3 S.H.)

    This course serves as an introduction to the sociology of families. Topics covered will include defining family, families in historical/social/cultural/economic perspectives, family dynamics, family structure, family diversity, and family policy. The focus of this course will be on U.S. families.  Meets GOAL 5. Recommended prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOC 216 - Social Problems


    (3 S.H.)

    The nature, characteristics and proposed solutions for selected social problems. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 9. Recommended prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOC 250 - Introduction to Gerontology


    (3 S.H.)

    This course serves as an introduction to the discipline of gerontology. Topics covered include: defining aging, social/biological/psychological perspectives of aging, aging and public policy, aging and families, aging and health, aging and employment and economics, and dying and death. Meets GOALS 5 & 7. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOC 334 - Sociology of Education


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of the American educational system in terms of its functions, formal and informal organization, and effects on social stratification and change. A selection of contemporary educational issues will be considered from a sociological perspective. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered every two years.
  
  •  

    SOC 340 - Social-Cultural Anthropology


    (3 S.H.)

    The cross-cultural and comparative examination of different cultures with emphasis on the varieties and ranges of human behavior. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    SOC 350 - Population Analysis


    (3 S.H.)

    Ways in which demographic factors (births, deaths, and migration) explain variations in social structures and processes. Examination of causes and consequences of current population growth at the regional, national, and international levels. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    ◆ SOC 376 - Introduction to Social Research


    (3 S.H.)

    An introductory course in the use of social research methods. Basic knowledge and skills are developed in all phases of the social research process. Sections of this course are taught by sociology and criminal justice faculty. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology  and, for BA Sociology majors, STAT 110 - Fundamentals of Statistics  or ◆ PSY 231 - Statistics . Limited to 30 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  
  
  
  •  

    SOC 386 - Field Experience-Gerontology


    (1-6 S.H.)

    This takes place in a supervised environment in which the student is relevantly involved with selected aspects of social gerontology and working with the aged population. P/NC only. Arranged.
  
  •  

    SOC 412 - Sociology of Gender and Sexuality


    (3 S.H.)

    This course explores the sociological study of gender, sex and sexuality. The course will cover the following topics: the definitions and social construction of gender and sex; sociological theories of gender, sex and sexuality; and gender, sex and sexuality based inequalities. Recommended prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Limit to 25 students. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    SOC 421 - Urban Sociology


    (3 S.H.)

    Growth, structure, and function of cities, spatial patterning, neighborhoods, and ethnic groups; social life of city dwellers and urban social change at the regional, national and international level. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    SOC 423 - Race Relations and Minority Groups


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines race and ethnic relations. It explores the concepts pertaining to such relations, e.g., discrimination, minorities, prejudice. It looks at the theories which attempt to explain prejudice and discrimination. It looks at the various minority groups from both current and historical perspectives. Finally, the course looks at oppression and the impact of oppression on people’s lives. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOC 430 - Political Sociology


    (3 S.H.)

    The organization of power into political structures and the social dynamics of this process. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered every two years.
  
  •  

    SOC 431 - Social Class and Power


    (3 S.H.)

    Social classes, their membership, and their use of social, economic, and political power. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Offered periodically.
  
  •  

    SOC 434 - Sociology of Health and Illness


    (3 S.H.)

    Social factors associated with the incidence and treatment of illness and the social organization of medical institutions and distribution of medical services. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered periodically.
  
  •  

    △ SOC 435 - Advanced Topics in Family Sociology


    (3 S.H.)

    This course serves to introduce students to the study of topics specific to the sociology of families. Topics may include: family formation, family change, family dissolution, parent-child relationships, work and family, aging families, among other topics. The focus of this course will be on U.S. families. Prerequisites:  SOC 212 - Sociology of Families . Limited to 25 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    SOC 438 - Health and Human Services Organizations


    (3 S.H.)

    Analysis of patterns, regularities, design, and behavior in organizations providing health and human services. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    SOC 439 - Sociology of Disabilities


    (3 S.H.)

    The course focuses upon the perceptions, social definitions and interactions of different kinds of disabilities and persons with disabilities by individuals, groups and institutions in the larger society. It examines the social organization of research, foundations, advocacy groups, support groups and other types of groups that work with disabilities. Prerequisites: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    △ SOC 440 - Sociology of Dying and Death


    (3 S.H.)

    From a sociological perspective, this course serves as an examination of various dimensions and experiences in dying and death. This course will emphasize dying and death in American society; however, cross-cultural perspectives are included. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    △ SOC 450 - Sociology of Aging


    (3 S.H.)

    Gerontology is the analytical examination of the aging process. Using a sociological perspective, this course studies the changing roles of the aged, problems confronting the aged, and other important issues. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    SOC 455 - Family Violence


    (3 S.H.)

    Analysis and study of family violence in America. Emphasis is on understanding causes and effects of interpersonal violence. Students will examine the response of the criminal justice system to the dilemma surrounding family violence. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
 

Page: 1 <- Back 107 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17