Oct 22, 2021  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code,  Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Note:

◎= Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

 

Sociology

  
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    SOC 470 - Mediation and Conflict Resolution


    (3 S.H.)

    The course will provide an introduction to conflict management and mediation as a facilitative process for alternative dispute resolution. Basic theoretical frameworks related to conflict management will be covered and mediation skills will be developed. Prerequisites: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology , senior standing in SOC/SW/CJ, and instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    ◎ SOC 474 - Intervention with Families


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an introduction to intervention with families involving home, school, and community resources in the facilitation of support and problem solving. Theoretical frameworks, research, and skills are covered. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . Grade only. Offered every two years.
  
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    SOC 480 - Variable Topics in Sociology


    (1-3 S.H.)

    A seminar course on selected topics and problems from the sociological perspective (subject to be chosen by instructor and announced before registration.) Prerequisite: 12 credits of sociology or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered on demand.
  
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    SOC 485 - Independent Readings in Sociology


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Intended to aid the student who has a special area of interest that goes beyond formal course limits. By arrangement.
  
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    SOC 487 - Special Projects in Sociology


    (1-3 S.H.)

    For the student interested in pursuing an independent research in sociology. Grade only. By arrangement.
  

Sociology: Criminal Justice

  
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    SOC 210 - Crime & Justice in America


    (3 S.H.)

    An introductory course focusing on the criminal justice system in America. To develop student’s capacity to understand the concepts of crime, justice, ordered liberty, fundamental fairness and individual rights and liberties. The course will include an examination and analysis of the agencies of justice with the intent of developing skills to understand evolving methodologies for identifying and managing offenders in a pluralistic society. Meets GOAL 9. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  
  
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    SOC 355 - Corrections


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of the systems and functions of corrections including the areas of administration of programs and security. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 30 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    SOC 387 - Field Experience Corrections


    (1-6 S.H.)

    An introductory experience designed to acquaint students with the structure, processes, and policies involved in professional human services agencies. Open to Sociology-Criminal Justice majors only. Arranged placement. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . P/NC only. Offered each semester. May be repeated once.
  
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    SOC 388 - Field Experience Law Enforcement


    (1-6 S.H.)

    An introductory experience designed to acquaint students with the structure, processes, and policies involved in professional human services agencies. Open to Sociology- Criminal Justice majors only. Arranged placement. Prerequisite: SOC 150 - Introduction to Sociology . P/NC only. Offered each semester. May be repeated once.
  
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    △ SOC 404 - Law Enforcement Investigation and Communication


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to introduce the student to law enforcement investigative and communication processes. The course identifies the four sources of investigative information, and provides practice in interviewing, interrogation, and investigative report writing. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 15 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    ◎ SOC 405 - Models and Strategies of Intervention


    (3 S.H.)

    An in-depth study of therapeutic methodologies and skills used in the correctional services. Emphasis is on assisting individual clients and small groups with behavioral and cognitive changes. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 20 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    SOC 406 - Probation and Parole


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to introduce the criminal justice student to the responsibilities of probation and parole officers. This course provides knowledge of probation and parole services, skill building in supervision of offenders and practical writing skills. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 25 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    △ SOC 407 - Offender Assessment and Management


    (3 S.H.)

    This course addresses the knowledge and skills required in assessing offender custody and program needs as well as the management of offenders in institutions and the community. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology- Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 20 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    SOC 417 - Operations and Procedures in Law Enforcement


    (3 S.H.)

    Operational and procedural requirements in law enforcement including community relations, testifying and criminal investigation, the police subculture, use of force, ethics, and patrol activities. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 30 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    △ SOC 418 - Criminal Law and Procedure


    (3 S.H.)

    Analysis and study of substantive criminal law and procedure from arrest through sentencing. The criminal process is examined in terms of legal steps and decision-making. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 30 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    SOC 420 - Minnesota Criminal Code


    (3 S.H.)

    This course deals with an analysis of the Minnesota Criminal Code and review of POST requirements. Limited to students seeking POST certification. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice Law Enforcement track, △ SOC 418 - Criminal Law and Procedure , and instructor’s permission. Limited to 20 students. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    SOC 424 - Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice


    (3 S.H.)

    Consideration of selected ethical issues in criminal justice organizations. Emphasis is on examining various ethical systems of practitioners and relations with various publics. Students will be given moral dilemmas and will consider their individual value system. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    SOC 461 - Criminal Justice Internship Corrections


    (1-12 S.H.)

    An intensive, professionally supervised placement in a selected criminal justice organization for the purpose of providing the student with an experience that integrates knowledge, methodology, and skills in a practical setting. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program; at least junior standing; and/or instructor’s permission. P/NC only. Offered each semester.
  
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    SOC 462 - Criminal Justice Internship Law Enforcement


    (1-12 S.H.)

    An intensive, professionally supervised placement in a selected criminal justice organization for the purpose of providing the student with an experience that integrates knowledge, methodology, and skills in a practical setting. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program; at least junior standing; and/or instructor’s permission. P/NC only. Offered each semester.
  
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    SOC 478 - Seminar in Criminal Justice


    (1-3 S.H.)

    An integrated examination of the problem areas in the present criminal justice system and an analysis of potential solutions. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 20 students. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    SOC 490 - Correctional Administration


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of current topics in correctional administration. A survey of theories or management styles will be examined. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 20 students. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    ◎ SOC 491 - Community Policing and Administration


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to assist the student in identifying and implementing a community policing philosophy using contemporary law enforcement organizational management processes. Prerequisites: Admission to the Sociology-Criminal Justice program and instructor’s permission. Limited to 25 students. Grade only. Offered each semester.

Spanish

  
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    SPAN 101 - Elementary Spanish I


    (4 S.H.)

    Introduction to the fundamentals of grammar of the Spanish language and the Spanish-speaking world for students with little or no prior training in Spanish. Students begin developing competency in the four basic skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) through communicative activities and cultural exploration. Prerequisite: None, but students are encouraged to take a departmentally-approved placement test in order to register for the course. Offered every semester. Note: Meets GOAL 8.
  
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    SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II


    (4 S.H.)

    Continued study of the fundamentals of grammar of the Spanish language and the Spanish-speaking world. Further development of competency in the four basic skills (reading, writing, listening, and speaking) through communicative activities and cultural exploration. Continuation of   Prerequisite:   or equivalent. Offered every semester. Note: Meets GOAL 8.
  
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    SPAN 201 - Intermediate Spanish I


    (4 S.H.)

    Students will continue to develop the linguistic skills and cultural knowledge needed to navigate a variety of cultural settings. Selected readings in Spanish literature and culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 102 - Elementary Spanish II  or equivalent. Offered every semester. Note: Meets GOAL 8.
  
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    SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II


    (4 S.H.)

    Continuation of SPAN 201 - Intermediate Spanish I . Students will continue to develop the linguistic skills and cultural knowledge needed to navigate a variety of cultural settings. Selected readings in Spanish literature and culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 201 - Intermediate Spanish I  or equivalent. Offered every semester. Note: Meets GOAL 8.
  
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    SPAN 300 - Spanish Linguistics and Phonetics


    (4 S.H.)

    Practice in all the sounds of the language with observations on its development from Latin. Exploration of the grammatical structures of Spanish. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Grade only. Offered every two years. Note: Effective Spring 2014: This course will be listed as  .
  
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    △ SPAN 301 - Spanish Composition and Conversation


    (4 S.H.)

    The emphasis is on class discussion and the development of critical thinking. Readings to be included are short stories by modern and classical authors. Overview of semantics and stylistics. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Offered every semester.
  
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    ◎ SPAN 302 - The Culture of Spain


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is taught in Spanish and focuses on the successive phases in the development of the culture of Spain. The development of Spanish art, architecture, music and lifestyle are studied as well as the different characteristics of the individual regions of Spain. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Offered every two years.
  
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    SPAN 303 - The Culture of Latin America


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is taught in Spanish and focuses on the countries of Central and South America, a study of the pre-Columbian cultures as well as their development after the Spanish colonization: Their art, traditions, and present lifestyle and customs. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Offered every two years.
  
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    SPAN 304 - Special Topics in Hispanic Literature and Culture


    (4 S.H.)

    Directed readings in Hispanic literature and culture. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Offered as needed and determined by the department. Effective Spring 2014: This course can be repeated once for a total of 8 credits when topics vary.
  
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    SPAN 340 - Spanish for the Professions


    (4 S.H.)

    This course focuses on the application of Spanish language into various professions including business, tourism, health care, social work, and other professions. Emphasizes the acquisition of vocabulary for the professions and cultural knowledge to enhance professional work. Prerequisites:   or equivalent. Offered every other year.
  
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    SPAN 395 - Spanish Linguistics


    (4 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to Spanish as a linguistic system. Students will analyze how sentence structure, word formation and sound work in Spanish. They will also contrast those patterns with those of English, as well as how variations due to regional, national and socioeconomic differences inform changes in the structure of Spanish. Prerequisite:   or equivalent.   suggested but not required. Grade only. Offered yearly. Note: Effective Spring 2014: This course was previously listed as  .
  
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    △ SPAN 401 - Spanish Peninsular Literature I


    (3 S.H.)

    The course is taught in Spanish. Class work focuses on the study of early Peninsular Spanish literature: Epic poetry, novel, theater, the Renaissance, and Baroque literature. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Offered every two years.
  
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    ◆ SPAN 402 - Spanish Peninsular Literature


    (4 S.H.)

    This course is intended to study in depth the different Spanish literary genres from the middle ages to the present. By studying its foundational texts, the course is also intended to understand the historical evolution of the Spanish language as well as the different threads that woven together create what we refer to as “Spanish Culture.” Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Grade only. Offered annually.
  
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    SPAN 403 - Latin American Literature


    (4 S.H.)

    A survey of Latin American literature from pre-colonial to contemporary literature. This course includes the study of pre-Hispanic writings (Nahautl, maya, quechua), Los Cronistas, colonial literature, Neoclassism, Romanticism, and the transition of the “gaucho epic” from the 19th to the 20th century. It also includes Modernism; the Criollismo; Post-Modernism; Magic Realism; and the Boom with writers such as Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Carlos Fuentes, Cortazar, and Vargas Llosa; the theater; and other essay writers. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Offered every year.
  
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    △ SPAN 410 - The Latino Experience in the United States


    (4 S.H.)

    This course examines historical and current issues relevant to the Latino population in the United States through the lens of social justice and human rights. The Latino experience will be studied through readings, literature, film, presentations and discussions. The role of Latinos in the work force, politics and educational system are of particular focus. Readings, literature, and films will be both in English and Spanish; class discussion will be in Spanish. Spanish writing skills will be developed through content work and direct instruction. Prerequisite:   or equivalent. Grade and P/NC. Offered every other year.

Special Education

  
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    SPED 300 - Children and Youth with Exceptionalities


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is an overview of exceptionalities including disabilities and giftedness.  Historical and legal foundations, philosophical and ethical perspectives, causes, characteristics, implications for individuals and their families, strategies, and services are included.  Open to all majors.  Sophomore status required.  Offered each semester.  Meets GOAL 5. Grade only.
  
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    SPED 405 - Student Management Systems


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of management systems used in modern preschool through high school education settings with emphasis upon preventive, proactive techniques. Both regulated and unregulated management systems for regular education and special education students are taught. Grade only.
  
  
  
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    SPED 414 - Multisensory/Comprehensive Language Arts Instruction I


    (5 S.H.)

    The first of a two-course sequence (SPED 414 and SPED 415 - Multisensory/Comprehensive Language Arts Instruction II ) in literacy methods. This first course examines the integration of reading, writing, listening, and speaking competencies in a unified literacy curriculum for learners from kindergarten through grade12. Instructional emphasis is placed upon learning the sound/symbols associations for all levels of written language including the multisensory essential teaching techniques in literacy instruction based on the original work of Orton and Gillingham. Instruction encompasses linguistic rules and the structure of English from elementary to the highest levels of vocabulary, and matching appropriate instructional strategies with the present knowledge of learners and their language learning capabilities. A required supervised practicum is integral to the course. WSU students enrolled in this course must demonstrate mastery of the skills learned by teaching students with reading difficulties under supervised conditions. This two-course sequence meets the Minnesota Board of Teaching reading competency requirements. Grade only. Offered fall semester only.
  
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    SPED 415 - Multisensory/Comprehensive Language Arts Instruction II


    (5 S.H.)

    The second of a two-course sequence ( SPED 414 - Multisensory/Comprehensive Language Arts Instruction I  and SPED 415) in literacy methods extends the examination of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing competencies into all areas of language arts. The focus will be on applying multisensory teaching techniques based on the original work of Orton and Gillingham to all the areas needed for literacy competencies: word decoding and encoding, comprehension skills, written expression skills, vocabulary development, and knowledgeable use of grammar. This will also include assessment of an individual’s specific instructional needs and ways to adapt instruction of essential concepts to fit those needs at all levels of literacy required by learners from kindergarten through high school. A required supervised practicum is integral to the course. WSU students enrolled in this course must demonstrate mastery of the skills learned by teaching students with reading difficulties under supervised conditions. This two-course sequence meets the Minnesota Board of Teaching reading competency requirements. Prerequisite: SPED 414 - Multisensory/Comprehensive Language Arts Instruction I . Grade only. Offered spring semester only.
  
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    SPED 420 - Special Education Administrative Procedures


    (3 S.H.)

    An overview of special education delivery including finances, legislation, philosophic considerations, least restrictive approaches, parent involvement, and due process safeguards. Local, state and federal rules and regulations are studied as are federal legislation including IDEA, ADA, and Section 504. Prerequisite: SPED 300 - Children and Youth with Exceptionalities . Grade only.
  
  
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    SPED 430 - Characteristics of Students with Disabilities


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to provide the student with an understanding of the characteristics of students who are developmentally disabled, learning disabled, or emotionally/behaviorally disordered. Implications for planning instruction and issues related to the field of Special Education are identified. Grade only.
  
  
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    SPED 433 - Practicum DD - Moderate to Severe Developmental Disabilities


    (3 S.H.)

    This field experience covers appropriate instruction and case management for individuals with moderate to severe developmental disabilities. Students find school or community placements, such as extended school year programs, summer camps, respite care, and group homes; however, Working or volunteering with a designated supervisor, practicum students complete a minimum of 45 contact hours. A portfolio and letter of verification are required. Prerequisite: SPED 300 - Children and Youth with Exceptionalities , instructor’s approval of the practicum site, and completed WSU registration. P/NC only.
  
  
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    ◎ SPED 441 - Practicum B Developmental Disabilities


    (15 S.H.)

    This student teaching experience covers appropriate instruction and case management for students with mild to severe developmental disabilities. It is a full-time, semester-long placement in a special education classroom under the supervision of a licensed special education teacher and a University supervisor. This is the final requirement before licensure. Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework for University Studies, the Professional Education Sequence, and Special Education with the exception of SPED 440 - Assessment/Methods for Students with Developmental Disabilities . P/NC only.
  
  
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    ◎ SPED 446 - Practicum B Learning Disabilities


    (15 S.H.)

    This student teaching experience covers appropriate instruction and case management for students with specific learning disabilities. It is a fulltime, semester-long placement in a special education classroom under the supervision of a licensed special education teacher and a University supervisor. This is the final requirement before licensure. Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework for University Studies, the Professional Education Sequence, and Special Education with the exception of SPED 445 - Assessment/Methods for Students with Learning Disabilities . P/NC only.
  
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    SPED 450 - Early Childhood Special Education Foundations


    (2 S.H.)

    This course is designed for teacher candidates of the early childhood special education program. The course will focus on the central concepts, tools of inquiry, and history and context of developmental delays, and disabilities and medical conditions as a foundation on which to base practice. Prerequisites: SPED 300 - Children and Youth with Exceptionalities  and SPED 405 - Student Management Systems . Grade only. Offered one semester each year at WSU-Rochester.
  
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    SPED 451 - Early Childhood Special Education Assessment, Planning, and Placement


    (4 S.H.)

    This course is designed for teacher candidates of the early childhood special education program. The course will focus on understanding referral, assessment, planning, and placement practices specific to teaching children from birth through age six who exhibit a broad range of developmental delays, disabilities, or medical complications. Prerequisites: SPED 300 - Children and Youth with Exceptionalities  and SPED 405 - Student Management Systems . Grade only. Offered one semester each year at WSU-Rochester.
  
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    △ SPED 452 - Early Childhood Special Education Instructional Design and Implementation


    (4 S.H.)

    This course is designed for teacher candidates of the early childhood special education program. The course will focus on understanding how to use individual family services plans and individual education program plans to design and implement developmentally appropriate instruction for young children with developmental delays, disabilities, or medical conditions. Prerequisites: SPED 300 - Children and Youth with Exceptionalities  and SPED 405 - Student Management Systems . Grade only. Offered one semester each year at WSU-Rochester.
  
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    SPED 453 - Early Childhood Special Education Collaboration


    (2 S.H.)

    This course is designed for teacher candidates of the early childhood special education program. The course will focus on understanding communication and interaction with students, families, other teachers, and the community to support student learning and well-being. Prerequisites: SPED 300 - Children and Youth with Exceptionalities  and SPED 405 - Student Management Systems . Grade only. Offered one semester each year at WSU-Rochester.
  
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    SPED 454 - Early Childhood Special Education Field Experience


    (2-3 S.H.)

    This course is designed for teacher candidates of the early childhood special education program. The course will focus on the application of the standards of effective practice in teaching children with developmental delays, disabilities, or medical conditions through a variety of early and ongoing clinical experiences with infants, toddlers, and preprimary children across a range of service delivery models. Prerequisites: SPED 300 - Children and Youth with Exceptionalities  and SPED 405 - Student Management Systems . Grade only. Offered one semester each year at WSU-Rochester.
  
  
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    SPED 490 - Seminar/ Workshop


    (1-3 S.H.)

    The subject matter to be developed by the Special Education Department and instructor prior to the workshop or seminar. Students may repeat the course without limitation on the number of credits as long as the subject matter is different. Grade only. Offered upon request.
  
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    SPED 499 - Individual Study


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Opportunity for the qualified advanced undergraduate and graduate student to work independently. Topics may include research, development of special projects, selected readings, etc. Time arranged. Prerequisites: Major advisor’s permission. Offered upon request. May be repeated

Statistics

  
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    STAT 110 - Fundamentals of Statistics


    (3 S.H.)

    Introductory statistics with emphasis on applications.  Meets GOAL 4. Prerequisite: Qualifying score on the mathematics placement exam or MATH 050 - Intermediate Algebra . Note: Students in certain majors should take STAT 210 - Statistics  instead of STAT 110.
  
  
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    STAT 250 - Actuarial Exam Preparation


    (2 S.H.)

    This is an independent study course designed to help students with actuarial exam preparation. Students enrolled in this course are required to take the appropriate exam at the date nearest completion of this course. Course cannot be applied toward fulfilling major or minor program requirements. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Offered on demand.
  
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    STAT 289 - Special Topics


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Exposure to lower-division statistical topics not included in other courses. Prerequisite: Determined by topics. Offered on demand.
  
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    STAT 290 - Independent Problems in Statistics


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Exposure to statistical topics not included in other courses. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Offered on demand.
  
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    ◆ STAT 301 - Statistical Thinking for Healthcare


    (3 S.H.)

    Introductory statistics with emphasis on understanding statistical applications in journals and research. Descriptive statistics, sampling, techniques of estimation, and hypothesis testing are included. The understanding of statistical applications as presented in health science research will be emphasized. Prerequisites:  Qualification by math placement exam or associate degree.

    Effective Spring 2014: Prerequisites: MATH 100 - Survey of Mathematics  or higher, STAT 110 - Fundamentals of Statistics  or higher or instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered every semester.

  
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    STAT 303 - Introduction to Engineering Statistics


    (3 S.H.)

    Introduction to statistics and quality control concepts and techniques. Topics include graphical techniques, descriptive statistics, probability distributions, hypothesis testing, control charts, process capability studies, and additional topics in total quality management. Prerequisite:  MATH 212 - Calculus I . Offered fall semester. Note: Credit will not be given for both STAT 210 - Statistics  and STAT 303.
  
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    STAT 305 - Biometry


    (3 S.H.)

    An introductory course of statistical applications to the biological sciences. Data reduction, sampling, techniques of estimation, hypothesis testing, and model verification procedures are included. Diversity indices, techniques of species sampling, and other specific biometric methods will be covered. Prerequisite:  MATH 120 - Precalculus , MATH 150 - Modeling Using Precalculus and Statistics , or instructor’s permission. Note: MATH 337 - Probability  cannot be used as a MATH or STAT elective for mathematics, mathematics education, or statistics majors.
  
  
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    ◆ STAT 320 - Statistical Quality Control


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the basic philosophy of quality control and statistical tools used in quality control. Tools to include control charts, Ishikawa fishbone charts, Pareto charts, histograms, stem-and-leaf plots, and dot plots. There will be industrial case studies and tours of local industries (when available). Prerequisite: An introductory statistics course (preferably STAT 210 - Statistics ). Offered alternate fall semesters.
  
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    STAT 321 - Industrial Design of Experiments I


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to applications of statistical methods used by industrial researchers to aid in the solution of certain types of industrial problems. Methods to include analysis of means, analysis of variance, factorial designs, fractional factorial (screening) designs. There will be industrial case studies and actual (hands-on) experience at local industries (when available). Prerequisite: An introductory statistics course (preferably STAT 210 - Statistics  or STAT 303 - Introduction to Engineering Statistics ). Offered spring semester.
  
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    STAT 322 - Industrial Design of Experiments II


    (3 S.H.)

    A second course in experimental design methods in industry. Topics may include empirical model building, review of factorial and fractional factorial designs, process improvement with steepest ascent, analysis of response surfaces, experimental designs for fitting response surfaces, Taguchi’s robust parameter designs, experiments with mixtures. Prerequisite: STAT 321 - Industrial Design of Experiments I  or instructor’s permission. Offered on demand.
  
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    ◆ STAT 325 - Data Management


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will give students an overview of the issues related to the management of data. Topics to be covered in this course include: data warehousing, data integrity and quality, data cleansing, basic programming concepts, the construction of simple algorithms, and the appropriate descriptive and graphical summaries of data. Commonly used software packages for the analysis and management of data will be emphasized. Prerequisites: An introductory statistics course. Offered spring semesters.
  
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    STAT 350 - Design of Samples and Surveys


    (3 S.H.)

    Practical problems of surveys. Design of optimal surveys. Questionnaire design. Practical problems of sampling. Design of optimal sampling procedures. Adapting standard statistical techniques to specialized sampling design. Meets GOAL 9. Prerequisite:  . Offered fall semester.
  
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    STAT 355 - Nonparametric Statistics


    (3 S.H.)

    Statistical methods based on runs, the empirical distribution function and ranks. Topics will include one and two sample tests, ANOVA, goodness of fit tests, rank regression, correlation, and confidence intervals. Both applications and theory emphasized. Prerequisite: STAT 110 - Fundamentals of Statistics  or STAT 210 - Statistics . Offered on demand.
  
  
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    STAT 365 - Experimental Design and Analysis


    (3 S.H.)

    One-way Analysis of Variance, planned comparisons, post-hoc procedures, two- and three-way Analysis of Variance, experimental design, Analysis of Covariance. Interpretation of computer output will be emphasized. Prerequisite:  . Offered spring semester.
  
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    ◎ STAT 370 - Statistical Consulting and Communications


    (3 S.H.)

    In this course, the student will gain an understanding of the nature of applied consulting and the scientific philosophies and skills required to be successful as a statistical consultant. This course will continue to develop the oral and written communication skills that are necessary for communicating technical statistical content with non-statisticians. Students will provide statistical consulting service to the University community when projects are available. Prerequisite: STAT 360 - Regression Analysis  or STAT 365 - Experimental Design and Analysis . Offered fall semesters.
  
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    STAT 405 - Biostatistics


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will give students an overview of Biostatistics. The topics to be covered include contingency tables analysis, relative risk, odds ratios, partial association, Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel methods, two-way ANOVA, interactions, repeated measures, logistic regression, Poisson regression, Kaplan-Meier methods, and Cox proportional hazards models. Parametric methods and various nonparametric alternatives will be discussed. Prerequisite:  . Offered alternate fall semesters.
  
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    ◎ STAT 415 - Multivariate Analysis


    (3 S.H.)

    Statistical analysis of multivariate data. Topics will include preparation of data for analysis, selection of techniques appropriate to research questions, measures of association for continuous and discrete variables, Hotelling’s T, MANOVA, MANCOVA, discriminant analysis, principal component and factor analysis. This is a computer-oriented course with emphasis on application. Prerequisites: MATH 242 - Linear Algebra , STAT 360 - Regression Analysis , or instructor’s permission. Offered alternate spring semesters.
  
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    ◎ STAT 425 - Modern Methods of Data Analysis


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the use of the computer as a powerful tool in data analysis. Topics will include statistical graphics, advanced regression techniques, curve fitting and smoothing, generalized additive models, CART, multivariate techniques, cross-validation and the bootstrap. Additional topics that may be covered are random number generation and Monte Carlo simulation methods. Prerequisites: MATH 242 - Linear Algebra , STAT 360 - Regression Analysis , or instructor’s permission. Offered alternate spring semesters.
  
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    STAT 440 - Epidemiology


    (3 S.H.)

    A general introduction to the concepts and methods of epidemiology as they are applied in a variety of disease situations. Topics include modeling the disease process in a population; retrospective, prospective, and observational studies; rates, ratios, and data interpretation; and evaluation of epidemiological information. Prerequisite:  . Offered on demand.
  
  
  
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    STAT 488 - Statistics Projects


    (1-6 S.H.)

    Practical experience working on real problems under the supervision of a faculty member experienced in statistics. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Offered on demand.
  
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    STAT 489 - Special Topics


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Exposure to statistical topics not included in other courses. Prerequisite: Determined by topics. Offered on demand.
  
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    STAT 490 - Independent Problems in Statistics


    (1-4 S.H.)

    An opportunity for continued study of selected topics. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Offered on demand.
  
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    STAT 492 - Practicum in Statistics


    (3-6 S.H.)

    Provides the student with experience and training in statistical techniques. The student will work a minimum of 100 hours (3 credits) or a minimum of 200 hours (6 credits) on a job utilizing statistics. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. P/NC only. Offered on demand.

Student Teaching

  
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    ◎ EDST 460 - Elementary Education with Early Childhood Student Teaching


    (1-16 S.H.)

    A capstone student teaching experience. One full semester of student teaching on a daily, full-time basis in an appropriate educational school setting. Prerequisites: All professional courses required for the major. P/NC only. Offered each semester.
  
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    ◎ EDST 464 - K-6 Student Teaching


    (1-16 S.H.)

    One full semester of student teaching on a full-day basis in a middle school. Prerequisites: All professional courses required for the major. P/NC only. Offered each semester.
  
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    ◎ EDST 465 - Student Teaching - Senior High School K-12 Specialty


    (1-16 S.H.)

    A capstone student teaching experience. One full semester of student teaching on a daily, full-time basis in an appropriate educational school setting. Prerequisites: All professional courses required for the major. P/NC only.
  
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    ◎ EDST 467 - Student Teaching - Early Childhood (Birth to Grade 3)


    (1-16 S.H.)

    Supervised teaching in two (2) Early Childhood placements. Prerequisites: All professional courses required for the major. P/NC only. Offered each semester.
  
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    ◎ EDST 469 - Global Student Teaching


    (1-18 S.H.)

    This is a capstone student teaching experience. Student teachers are assigned a domestic/international school placement based on licensure level. This capstone experience is for one full semester on a daily full-time basis. Prerequisites: Completion of all coursework required for major. P/NC only.
  
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    EDST 470 - Middle School Student Teaching


    (1-5 S.H.)

    A capstone student teaching experience. Four-Six weeks of student teaching in a middle school on a daily, full-time basis in an appropriate educational school setting for middle level minor. Prerequisites: All professional courses required for the major. P/NC only. Offered each semester.

Theatre and Dance

  
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    THAD 090 - THAD Showcase


    (0 S.H.)

    Once-weekly sessions present creative work in theatre and dance courses, critiques of productions, discussions of professional, educational, and employment issues. P/NC only. Offered each semester. Repeatable: Grade of “P” in six enrollments normally required of theatre majors; four of theatre minors and dance minors.
  
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    THAD 100 - Theatre Activities


    (1 S.H.)

    Active participation in a major theatre or dance production as performer or in scenic studio or costume studio. Course is intended for non-theatre majors; Offered each semester. may be repeated up to six S.H.
  
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    THAD 107 - Introduction to Technical Theatre


    (3 S.H.)

    Study of non-performance aspects of theatre for theatre and general students. Course contains service hour requirement. Attendance at department productions is required. Meets GOAL 6 (Fine Arts). THAD majors and minors must concurrently enroll in THAD 291 - Rehearsal and Performance . Grade only. Offered yearly.
 

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