Sep 25, 2021  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code,  Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Note:

◎= Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

 

Computer Science

  
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    CS 482 - Internet/Web Architecture and Development


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will emphasize the distributed software architecture for web-based software and web services design and development. J2EE architecture will be used to provide a basis for developing software that will run on the client-side, the server-side, in a distributed system, or in a standalone environment. Topics include server components, servlets, Java server pages, Javabeans, session control and security, EJBs, transaction processing, database connections, and connection pools. A major application development environment will be used to design, develop, test, and deploy applications. Students will develop a distributed web application. Prerequisites: ◎ CS 471 - Object Oriented Design and Development  and either CS 344 - Introduction to Web Programming  or CS 472 - Reusable Software Architectures , or instructor’s permission.
  
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    CS 485 - Database Systems Design


    (3 S.H.)

    The design and development of database management systems. Topics include relational object-oriented database operations and implementation, query language development, normalization, database file management, deadlock handling, security and integrity problems, and distributed DBMS. Prerequisites: ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures  and △ CS 385 - Applied Database Management Systems .
  
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    CS 490 - Independent Problems in Computer Science


    (1-3 S.H.)

    An opportunity to continue the study of selected topics. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission.. Offered according to demand.
  
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    CS 491 - Practicum in Computer Science


    (6 S.H.)

    Students work a minimum of 300 hours in an application environment under the supervision of a computer science professional. Open only to junior or senior declared CS majors who have satisfied specific requirements. Contact the Computer Science Practicum Coordinator, or visit the department website, for more information on these requirements. Prerequisites: Permission of coordinator is required. Pass/No Credit only. Note: Only 3 S.H. apply to CS majors.
  
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    △ CS 495 - Computer Science Research Seminar


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is an undergraduate research seminar designed for upper-level computer science students. Students choose, with the help of faculty, an undergraduate research thesis topic. Computer science research methods are introduced, and the various forms of technical writing common to computer science are studied. Students conduct their research, write a technical paper as a result, and present their findings during the year-end senior technical conference. Students also read and critically review several computer science conference and journal articles. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing , ◆ CS 341 - Data Structures , and at least two 400-level CS courses.

Computer Science Education

  
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    CSED 321 - Computers in the Mathematics Curriculum


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to provide future mathematics teachers with a broad overview of the uses of computers in the mathematics curriculum. The primary emphasis is on selecting and evaluating courseware; using teacher utilities; and the role of programming and computer literacy in the mathematics curriculum. Prerequisites: MATH 213 - Calculus II  and junior or senior standing. A computer programming course is advised. Offered according to demand.
  
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    CSED 452 - Computer Applications in Elementary Education


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is specifically designed for pre-service and in-service elementary classroom teachers for the purpose of exploring selected areas of microcomputer applications in elementary education. The primary goal of the course for each student is the acquisition of a positive attitude in the use of the microcomputer as a tool. To accomplish this goal, the student has direct experiences with computer-assisted instruction (CAI), computer-managed instruction (CMI), information retrieval, programming languages, software evaluations, and elementary computer literacy curriculums. Offered according to demand.
  
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    CSED 480 - Computer Workshop


    (3 S.H.)

    Emphasis is on using microcomputers in education. Topics are selected from multimedia, authoring languages, LOGO (including turtle graphics), computer-assisted instruction (CAI), computer-managed instruction (CMI), information retrieval, text editing, educational software/courseware packages, software evaluation, computer curriculums, classroom organization, and computer literacy. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission. Offered according to demand. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    CSED 481 - Computer Applications


    (3 S.H.)

    This is intended to be an off-campus course. The computer applications to be covered are determined by the requesting group or school district with the computer science faculty. Not open to computer science majors/minors. Offered according to demand. May be repeated for credit.
  
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    CSED 489 - Special Topics


    (3 S.H.)

    Experiences in computer science and computer science education for teachers of grades K-12. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission. Offered according to demand.

Counselor Education

  
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    CE 200 - Career/Life Decision Making


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to give students an opportunity to explore the skills, processes, and information necessary to become actively and responsibly involved in their own college program planning as well as their longer-term career and life planning. P/NC only.
  
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    CE 220 - Emotions and Behavior


    (3 S.H.)

    This course focuses on promoting students’ self-awareness and personal growth, with significant learning opportunities structured through in-class and out of class individual projects, small group work, and large group experiential activities.
  
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    ◎ CE 300 - Academic Planning and Career Foundations


    (3 S.H.)

    This course guides students through an individualized process of considering what it means to become a scholarly person and engaged citizen. The course is particularly relevant to students developing a customized degree through Professional Studies, and is also a helpful course for students in any college who are unsure about their major focus. The course helps students develop their own educational plan by guiding them in a process to reflect on their career interests, their personal stages of development, what they want to learn, and the best way to learn it. This course utilizes a variety of dynamic, web-based tools and offers advanced learning topics in critical thinking, time management, memory, and other study skills. While most students often focus first on their vocational goals in higher education, this course also challenges students to consider their community involvement and lifelong learning needs, as well as social justice and multicultural concerns. Grade and P/NC.
  
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    CE 432 - Stress Management


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an introduction to important concepts, issues, skills, and interventions related to the identification and management of personal stress.
  
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    CE 495 - Workshop: Counseling Specialties


    (0.5-4 S.H.)

    The topics of these workshops vary. Announcements of the topics and any special enrollment issues are made in advance of the workshop offering.

Economics

  
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    ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics


    (3 S.H.)

    The private enterprise system, demand-and-supply, and market interaction; business costs and prices, forms of competition, resource markets; and the mixed economy. Meets GOAL 5. Prerequisites: (Recommended) General Education math requirement.
  
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    ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics


    (3 S.H.)

    National income analysis; aggregate demand-and-supply; money and banking; business cycles, monetary and fiscal policy.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Prerequisites: (Recommended) General Education math requirement.
  
  
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    ECON 220 - Applied International Development


    (3 S.H.)

    The course provides an introduction to the economic, business, social, and political issues that confront developing countries, and solutions that have been utilized or proposed to confront these issues. This course is offered only in conjunction with a travel study program to a country or countries. The required travel study component of this course will provide students with the opportunity to learn first-hand about international development issues. Meets GOAL 8. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission.
  
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    ◆ ECON 222 - Statistics for Business and Economics


    (3 S.H.)

    Elementary statistics for business and economics including descriptive measures, elementary probability, sampling of distributions, and statistical inference. Prerequisites: Qualifying score on the mathematics placement exam or  . Grade Only.
  
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    ECON 302 - Intermediate Microeconomics


    (3 S.H.)

    The theoretical approach to consumer demand, decision-making in the pricing and employment of resources under the major market classification, and the distribution of resources and production. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics .
  
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    △ ECON 303 - Intermediate Macroeconomics


    (3 S.H.)

    National income accounting and measurement, theory of the determination of national economic activity; economic growth; consumption; investment; government spending and net exports; design and effects of fiscal and monetary policies; inflation. Prerequisites: ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics .
  
  
  
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    ECON 315 - Environmental and Natural Resource Economics


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the economics of natural resource management and environmental quality. Theory and policy in the use of nonrenewable and renewable resources, and in the control of pollution. Current issues in those areas are featured. Meets GOAL 10. Prerequisites: (Recommended) ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics .
  
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    ECON 320 - Business-Government Relations


    (3 S.H.)

    Government economic regulation of business including anti-trust legislation, natural monopoly regulation, and selected social regulation topics such as consumer product safety. Meets GOAL 9. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics .
  
  
  
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    ECON 390 - Economics of the Middle East


    (3 S.H.)

    The Middle East possesses two-thirds of the world’s oil reserves, which the rest of the world uses as a basic input for its economies. In this course, students study the economics of oil and other natural resources of the region, such as the rapidly growing population and its impact on the labor markets as well as the impact all these factors have on scarce basic necessities such as water and food. The course also examines a brief history of ongoing conflicts within the region and their pull on increasing military spending within the context of the current Middle East economies. Prerequisites: ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECON 398 - Internship


    (1-6 S.H.)

    Credits will not be counted in the economics major, but as general elective credit. Prerequisites: Concurrent enrollment in ECON 399 - Internship Problem . P/NC only.
  
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    ECON 399 - Internship Problem


    (3 S.H.)

    Prerequisites: Junior status in economics major, 2.5 GPA, and instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    ECON 400 - Public Finance: Taxation


    (3 S.H.)

    Structure and economic effects of U.S. tax revenue sources such as the personal income tax and corporate income tax; principles of economic incidence and optimal taxation; current issues in taxation. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECON 401 - Entrepreneurship and the American Economy


    (3 S.H.)

    This course focuses on the role of entrepreneurs in the development of the U.S. economy and the methods used by successful entrepreneurs. The course includes sections on American economic history and on competing economic systems with an emphasis on the role of entrepreneurship in the free-market system. Prerequisites: ECON 201  and  ECON 202 .FIN 360  Grade only.
  
  
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    ECON 405 - Monetary Theory and Policy


    (3 S.H.)

    The theory and practice of monetary policy in a modern open economy. This includes the microeconomic foundations of the demand for assets, including money; interrelationships between nonmonetary assets, money, and rates of return; the ability of central banks to manipulate the money supply and influence economic activity; and the roles of public and private debt in monetary policy. Prerequisites: △ ECON 303 - Intermediate Macroeconomics , △ ECON 304 - Money and Banking , or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECON 415 - International Economic Development


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the past and current paths to economic growth and development of countries. The course will analyze the economic policies and performances of countries by using economic theory and economic and social data. Emphasis is on developing countries of the Third World, the newly industrialized countries and former socialist countries undergoing transition to a capitalist system. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics  and ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics .
  
  
  
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    ECON 430 - Asian Economies in Transition


    (3 S.H.)

    This course focuses on the economic transitions that have occurred in Asia. It will include a study of the different economic development strategies and policies that have been used in various Asian countries and a study of which policies have been successful. It will use a comparative approach to examine similarities and differences among countries. Asia’s efforts at regional integration, globalization and development of its financial markets will also be included in the course. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics  and ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    ECON 435 - The Economies of the Americas


    (3 S.H.)

    This course studies the economic evolution of some of the economies of the Americas including the USA, Canada, Mexico, Brazil and Argentina. It traces the main periods and events surrounding the modern-day economies of the Americas. The economic policies associated with these economies are described, analyzed, and compared. Special emphasis is given to the theory, practice and problems of economic interdependence and interaction in the region. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics  and ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    ECON 440 - Industrial Organization


    (3 S.H.)

    A theoretical and empirical study of the economic structure, conduct and performance of industry. Topics include concentration, scale economies, entry barriers, and collusive oligopoly practices. Topics are used to judge industrial performance relative to societal goals. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics .
  
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    ECON 444 - Public Finance: Expenditures and the Deficit


    (3 S.H.)

    A practical and theoretical approach to public expenditures. The theory of public goods; use of benefit-cost analysis; analysis of major spending programs; and the effect of the deficit on economic activity. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics  and ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ECON 450 - Health Economics


    (3 S.H.)

    In-depth analysis of the market for health care services including the demand of health services; the supply of such services; and alternative delivery modes financing by individuals, government, and third-party payers. Health care policy at the federal, state, and local level is evaluated. Prerequisites: ECON 201 - Principles of Microeconomics  and ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics .
  
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    ECON 480 - Independent Studies in Economics


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Offers the advanced student an opportunity to do additional reading and/or research in areas of special interest. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission.. Note: Total credits may not exceed 6.
  

Education

  
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    EDUC 115 - Improving Reading and Study Skills


    (1 S.H.)

    To assist students who may have problems with reading skills and to help them develop efficient study habits to participate successfully in college-level courses. P/NC only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EDUC 120 - Parenting


    (3 S.H.)

    The social, emotional, physical, and intellectual development of children from birth to adolescence is outlined. Parenting strategies and child-rearing practices are discussed. This course meets the requirements for USP: Contemporary Citizenship and Democratic Institutions. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EDUC 221 - Children’s Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    This course teaches students about children’s literature. Consideration will be given to locating and evaluating early literacy, primary, and intermediate children’s books and to the method of organizing, teaching, and evaluating a literature program at all age levels. Current issues and research will be examined. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EDUC 299 - Latino and Latin American Perspectives


    (3 S.H.)

    This course investigates Latino demographic growth in Minnesota and creates intercultural exchanges between WSU students and Latino K-12 students with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Greater Winona. The course will address issues pertinent to citizen development, such as community-based learning and mentoring. Students will also learn about the history of racism, prejudice, and cultural deficit theory in the United States. Students will understand their own personal biases, where these biases came from, and how to think critically about contemporary issues pertinent to Latino populations in Minnesota. This course meets the requirements for USP: Contemporary Citizenship and Democratic Institutions. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  
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    EDUC 329 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts II


    (3 S.H.)

    The second of a two-course sequence in literacy methods extends the examination of reading, writing, listening, speaking, and viewing competencies by focusing on learners ages nine to fourteen (grades 4-8). Emphasis is placed upon strategies for expanding purposes and genres, integration of assessment and instruction, and teaching for self-regulation of comprehension, composing, and editing strategies. Prerequisites: EDUC 328 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts I . Offered each semester.
  
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    EDUC 330 - Literacy for Second Language Learners


    (3 S.H.)

    This course addresses the teaching of literacy for students with a primary language other than English. After examining the interwoven nature of language and culture, the course will focus on the instructional approaches to meet the needs of second language learners in school settings. Special attention will be given to the role of home school communication in programs for second language learners. Prerequisites: EDUC 328 - Teaching Reading and Language Arts I . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
  
  
  
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    EDUC 406 - Teaching and Learning in American Culture


    (2 S.H.)

    This course is designed exclusively for incoming international students who participate in the Winona State University Cross Cultural Outreach Scholarship Program. Students will learn about cultural differences in local schools, on the university campus, and in the community. During the course, students will learn how to effectively deliver presentations about their cultures and global themes to various audiences in local schools, on the university campus, and to community groups. Students will acquire knowledge and skills related to effective use of presentation enhancements such as PowerPoint, presentation board, and question/answer sessions Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    △ EDUC 410 - Foundations of Early Childhood Education


    (3 S.H.)

    This is the introductory course in early childhood education examining the history, theory, trends, and contemporary issues in early childhood education as well as the role of the early childhood teacher. Prerequisite: Admission to the teacher education program. Offered each semester.
  
  
  
  
  
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    EDUC 490 - Individual Problems in Education


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Opportunity for the qualified advanced undergraduate and graduate student to work independently. Topics may include research, development of special projects, selected readings, etc. Time-arranged. May be repeated to a total of 4 credits. Prerequisites: Major advisor’s permission, completion of the Professional Sequence, and for elementary majors, completion of the Professional Education Sequence. P/NC only for undergraduates. Offered each semester. May be repeated to a total of 4 credits.
  
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    EDUC 498 - Workshops and Seminar


    (1-3 S.H.)

    The subject matter will be developed by the Department and instructor prior to the workshop or seminar. Students may repeat the course without limitation on the number of credits as long as the subject matter is different. P/NC only. Offered on demand.
  
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    EDUC 499 - Workshops and Seminar


    (1-3 S.H.)

    The subject matter will be developed by the Department and instructor prior to the workshop or seminar. Students may repeat the course without limitation on the number of credits as long as the subject matter is different. Grade only. Offered on demand.

Education Leadership

  
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    EL 201 - Topics Seminar


    (1 S.H.)

    This course is designed to explore the connections between various disciplines through activities outside of class and discussion. Grade only. Note: This class partially satisfies the 120 semester hour requirement for graduation. This course may be repeated up to three times under different topics.
  
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    EL 301 - Resident Assistant Development I


    (1 S.H.)

    This course is designed to explore the connections between various disciplines through activities outside of class and discussion. Note: This class partially satisfies the 120 semester hour requirement for graduation.
  
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    EL 302 - Residential Assistant Development II


    (1 S.H.)

    This course is designed to explore the connections between various disciplines through activities outside of class and discussion. Note: This class partially satisfies the 120 semester hour requirement for graduation.
  
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    EL 414 - Introduction to Change Leadership


    (3 S.H.)

    Understanding how individuals engage in change is critical.  Students in this course will explore theory, models, and methods for leading and understanding change.  Students will study problems and issues influencing individual and group behavior in organizations, and develop collaborative practices and strategies to lead change. Grade only.
  
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    EL 449 - Appreciative Coaching: Theory and Practice


    (1 S.H.)

    The course focuses on the theory and practice of Appreciative Inquiry with emphasis on coaching.  Appreciative Inquiry is the art and practice of asking questions that strengthen a system’s capacity to explore issues and innovation from a positive frame.  Grade only.

Educational Foundations, Research, and Technology

  
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    EFRT 150 - Introductory Field Experience


    (0-1 S.H.)

    A general elective education-related field experience either within a community-based or school-based setting.  Persons enrolled in EFRT 150 for “0” credit will be placed within a community-based setting.  Persons enrolled in EFRT 150 for “1” credit will be placed within a school-based setting.  Persons enrolled in EFRT 150 must arrange their schedule with an EFRT faculty member prior to registration.  May be repeated. Prerequisites: Instructor’s permission. P/NC only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EFRT 303 - Human Development and Learning: Elementary Education with Early Childhood Emphasis


    (4 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the psychological and social dimensions of learning and development and their influence on students’ participation in school. The course focuses on psychological theories of learning and development, classroom management, and the relationship between psychological theory and classroom practice in early childhood and primary classrooms. 30-40 hours of field experience is required in addition to regularly scheduled on-campus class sessions. Concurrent enrollment with ◆ EFRT 310 - Instructional Planning and Assessment: Elementary Education with Early Childhood Emphasis  . Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EFRT 304 - Human Development and Learning: Middle Level and K-12


    (4 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the psychological and social dimensions of learning and development and their influence on students’ participation in school. The course focuses on psychological theories of learning and development, classroom management, and the relationship between psychological theory and classroom practice in elementary and middle school classrooms. 30-40 hours of field experience is required in addition to regularly scheduled on-campus class sessions.  Concurrent enrollment with ◆ EFRT 311 - Instructional Planning and Assessment: Middle Level and K-12 . Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EFRT 305 - Human Development and Learning: Secondary


    (4 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the psychological and social dimensions of learning and development and their influence on students’ participation in school. The course focuses on psychological theories of learning and development, classroom management, and the relationship between psychological theory and classroom practice in secondary classrooms. 30-40 hours of field experience is required in addition to regularly scheduled on-campus class sessions.  Concurrent enrollment with ◆ EFRT 312 - Instructional Planning and Assessment: Secondary . Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EFRT 308 - Human Relations and Student Diversity


    (3 S.H.)

    The course takes a laboratory and a directed study approach in areas such as communication, group interaction, trust, interpersonal relationships, and the study of minorities, ethnic groups, and second language learners. Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program. Offered each semester.
  
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    ◆ EFRT 310 - Instructional Planning and Assessment: Elementary Education with Early Childhood Emphasis


    (3 S.H.)

    Principles of curriculum formation including writing objectives, unit planning, and daily lesson planning. Evaluation techniques to determine achievement of objectives through teacher-made tests, standardized tests, and observation techniques as well as statistics of measurement, specialized measurement instruments, and interpretation.   Taken concurrently with EFRT 303 - Human Development and Learning: Elementary Education with Early Childhood Emphasis . Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    ◆ EFRT 311 - Instructional Planning and Assessment: Middle Level and K-12


    (3 S.H.)

    Principles of curriculum formation including writing objectives, unit planning, and daily lesson planning for elementary and middle levels form the emphasis of this course. Assessment, measurement, and evaluation techniques are studied to determine achievement of objectives through teacher-made tests, performance assessments, standardized tests, and observation techniques. Statistics of measurement, specialized measurement instruments and test interpretation are also studied. Thirty clock-hours of field experience are required, in addition to the regularly scheduled on-campus class sessions.  Taken concurrently with EFRT 304 - Human Development and Learning: Middle Level and K-12 . Prerequisites: Admission to the teacher education program. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    ◆ EFRT 312 - Instructional Planning and Assessment: Secondary


    (3 S.H.)

    This course focuses on principles of curriculum formation including writing objectives, unit planning, and daily lesson planning for secondary education. Assessment, measurement, and evaluation techniques are studied to determine achievement of objectives through teacher-made tests, performance assessments, standardized tests, and observation techniques. Statistics of measurement, specialized measurement instruments and test interpretation are also studied. Thirty clock-hours of field experience are required, in addition to the regularly scheduled on-campus class sessions.  Taken concurrently with EFRT 305 - Human Development and Learning: Secondary . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EFRT 352 - Introduction to Educational Technology


    (2 S.H.)

    This course covers basic technological knowledge, which will enable the teacher to plan technology-based instruction, integrate technology into the curriculum, and enhance the teacher’s technological competencies. Test-out option available. P/NC only. Offered each semester.
  
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    EFRT 400 - Human Development and Learning: Early Childhood and Elementary


    (2 S.H.)

    This course provides students with the knowledge, skill, and understanding of the psychological and social dimensions of human development and learning. In particular, the impact of development and learning on children from early childhood years to intermediate grades within an educational setting. This course has field experience hours within local school districts. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 401 - Human Development and Learning: K-12 & 5-12


    (2 S.H.)

    This course provides students with the knowledge, skill, and understanding of the psychological and social dimensions of human development and learning. In particular, the impact of development and learning on children in K-12 and 5-12 educational settings. This course has field experience hours within local school districts. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 420 - Classroom Management: Early Childhood and Elementary


    (1 S.H.)

    This course provides students with the knowledge, skill, and understanding o preparing a safe environment for all learners. In particular, the impact of strategies on managing children from early childhood years to intermediate grades within an educational setting. This course has field experience hours within local school districts. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 421 - Classroom Management: K-12 and 5-12


    (1 S.H.)

    This course provides students with the knowledge, skill, and understanding of preparing a safe environment for all learners. In particular, the impact of strategies on managing children in the K-12 and 5-12 educational settings. This course has field experience hours within local school districts. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 440 - Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: Early Childhood and Elementary


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with the knowledge, skill, and understanding of the psychological and social dimensions of human development and learning. In particular, the impact of development and learning on children from early childhood years to intermediate grades within an educational setting. This course has field experience hours within local school districts. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 441 - Curriculum, Instruction, and Assessment: K-12 and 5-12


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with knowledge, skill, and understanding of the psychological and social dimensions of human development and learning. In particular, the impact of development and learning on children in the K-12 and 5-12 educational setting. This course has field experience hours within local school districts. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 442 - The Adult Learner


    (3 S.H.)

    This course focuses on the characteristics and development of adult learners. Offered yearly.
  
  
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    EFRT 450 - Comparative Education


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the purposes, organization, offerings, and achievements of education in selected foreign countries. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
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    EFRT 460 - Multicultural Youth, Children, & Families Part I: Early Childhood & Elementary


    (2 S.H.)

    This course provides a structure for acquiring, building, and demonstrating mechanisms for integrating multicultural content into mainstream curricula. Specific attention is geared to goals, concepts and instructional planning in elementary education addressing culture, ethnicity, race, gender, language, socioeconomic levels, religion, age, ethics and exceptionality. Ethnography is used to develop a Social Reconstructionist approach intended to transform teaching for educational equity and social justice. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 461 - Multicultural Youth, Children, & Families: Part I: K-12 and 5-12


    (2 S.H.)

    This course provides a structure for acquiring, building, and demonstrating mechanisms for integrating multicultural content into mainstream curricula. Specific attention is geared to goals, concepts and instructional planning in elementary education addressing culture, ethnicity, race, gender, language, socioeconomic levels, religion, age, ethics and exceptionality. Ethnography is used to develop a Social Reconstructionist approach intended to transform teaching for educational equity and social justice. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 462 - Multicultural Youth, Children, and Families Part II


    (1 S.H.)

    This course provides a structure for acquiring, planning, and implementing ethnographic strategies designed to help students identify the sociocultural influences on educational processes and reform efforts occurring in local school districts. Sociological theories, including Functionalism, Conflict Theory, and Interpretivism, are used to analyze the meaning of said processes and reform efforts for stakeholders in the districts analyzed. The foci of these analyses are to help students collaborate with stakeholders in the ethnographic settings to ensure educational equity and social justice for diverse learners traditionally marginalized in educational settings. Concurrent enrollment in  . Prerequisites: Admission to Teacher Education. Grade only. Offered every semester.
  
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    EFRT 483 - Multicultural Children, Youth, and Families


    (2 S.H.)

    This course provides structure for acquiring, building and demonstrating mechanisms for integrating multicultural content into mainstream curricula. Specific attention is geared to goals, concepts and instructional planning in elementary education addressing culture, ethnicity, race, gender, language, socioeconomic levels, religion, age, ethics and exceptionality. The social reconstructionist approach is infused to provide demonstrations of transforming teaching for equity and justice. Offered yearly.

Education-Reading

  
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    EDRD 450 - Differentiated Reading Instruction


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines the use of assessment data to plan differentiated reading instruction for a range of learners with diverse cognitive, linguistic, and cultural backgrounds. Emphasis is placed upon differentiation of instruction within classrooms and collaboration with other professionals from the design of data-based interventions for struggling readers, advanced readers and English language learners. Prerequisites:  . Prerequisite or co-requisite:  . Grade only. Offered yearly. Note: Graduate project required if taken at graduate level. In addition, a bachelor’s degree and an elementary or special education teaching license when taken at the 500 level.
  
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    EDRD 460 - New Literacies and Literacy Engagement


    (3 S.H.)

    This course helps teachers balance the strengths of traditional text-centric reading materials with the demands and opportunities of increasingly diverse environments for interactive digital literacies. Special attention is given to supporting authentic engagement through blending of multiple literacies, student-driven dialogue, analysis of authors’ intended meaning, and interrogation in text in light of multiple viewpoints. Prerequisites or co-requisites:   or EDRD 550 (or equivalent). In addition, a bachelor’s degree and an elementary or special education teaching license when taken at 500 level. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    EDRD 470 - Data-based Improvement of Reading Programs


    (3 S.H.)

    This course has a focus on understanding collection, analysis, and interpretation of data as the driving force behind continuous improvement of reading instruction in the classroom and school. Particular attention is paid to continuous progress monitoring, responsive intervention, and collaboration among important stakeholders in the classroom, building, district, and community. Prerequisites or co-requisites:   or EDRD 550 (or equivalent). In addition, a bachelor’s degree and an elementary or special education teaching license when taken at 500 level. Grade only. Offered yearly. Note: Graduate project required.

English

  
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    ENG 099 - Introduction to College Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    Students undertake intensive writing practice with special focus on the fundamentals of sentence and paragraph structure. The course aims to prepare students for ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing , College Reading and Writing. Students who do not pass this course will not be permitted to take ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . (Credits do not count toward graduation.) Grade only.
  
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    ENG 105 - ESL: Listening to Academic Speech


    (3 S.H.)

    Intensive practice in understanding academic lectures. Attention is also paid to pronunciation and other oral language skills. Designed to help ESL learners function successfully in American university classrooms. Grade only.
  
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    ENG 106 - ESL: Academic Reading and Writing I


    (3 S.H.)

    Intensive practice in academic English with special attention to reading comprehension, including vocabulary, grammar, and basic writing skills. Designed to prepare non-native speakers for more advanced English courses and help them become successful in other academic disciplines. Must be followed by ENG 107 - ESL: Academic Reading and Writing II . Grade only.
  
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    ENG 107 - ESL: Academic Reading and Writing II


    (3 S.H.)

    Further development of communicative skills in academic reading and writing for advanced non-native speakers. Focusing on organizational/rhetorical skills in writing and comprehension of culturally particular academic texts. Specific practice and preparation for ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Prerequisite: ENG 106 - ESL: Academic Reading and Writing I  or placement through testing. Grade only.
 

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