Sep 25, 2021  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code,  Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Note:

◎= Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

 

English

  
  •  

    ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing


    (4 S.H.)

    This course aims to strengthen students’ reading and writing abilities in preparation for college-level writing. A means of learning and inquiry, the writing in this course is based on interpreting, analyzing, and critiquing texts as well as on conducting research, synthesizing sources, and using citation/documentation formats.  Meets GOAL 1. Prerequisite: Qualifying ACT English sub-score, minimum score on the English placement exam, or successful completion of ENG 099 - Introduction to College Writing . Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 112 - Research Writing


    (1 S.H.)

    Course focuses on researching and composing a documented argumentative essay. For students transferring an appropriate 3 S.H. composition course in order to meet the requirement usually fulfilled by ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Meets GOAL 1 with transfer English course. Prerequisite: Department Chairperson’s permission required. Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 120 - Introduction to Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    Intensive reading in selected major forms and themes of literature. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s content.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 210 - Advanced Expository Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    An advanced course in writing expository essays for academic audiences, this course emphasizes the development of a mature prose style and a sophisticated approach to textual interpretation. Students refine their rhetorical and grammatical/mechanical competence and strengthen their skills in academic research, source integration, critical analysis, and evaluative judgment. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 211 - Writing in Communities


    (3 S.H.)

    This course concerns the study and practice of writing as a means of participation in a diverse, democratic, and literate society. Students may work with community partners to define and complete writing projects. Meets GOAL 9. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 220 - Multicultural American Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    Recognizing the rich array of cultures that have contributed to American history, life, and art, this course focuses on one such culture or on a cross-cultural topic and offers students a study of vital literary voices and their social contexts. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 7. Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 221 - Topics in World Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    Furnishing students with an opportunity to read artful writing of cultures other than those of the United States and England, this course focuses on a selected theme, genre, period, language, nationality, or region. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 8. Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 222 - Introduction to Creative Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to writing poetry, fiction, and other creative genres (may include drama, screenwriting, or creative nonfiction). Covers basics of genre, style, and voice.  Meets GOAL 6 (Fine Arts). Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  . Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 223 - Classical Mythology


    (3 S.H.)

    This course covers the principal characters, narratives, and genres of Greek and Roman “mythologies.” Studying this ancient literature and its contexts, students acquire knowledge of the Classical tradition and its influences in literary history. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 224 - The Bible as Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    The literary structure and genres of the Hebrew and Christian scriptures with special attention to the cultures that created them and major translations. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 225 - Topics in Literature


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Intensive study of a selected topic in English and foreign literature in translation. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit.
  
  •  

    ENG 226 - Topics in Writing


    (1-4 S.H.)

    This course enables inquiry into and practice with specialized kinds of writing such as journal writing, web writing, and review writing. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit.
  
  •  

    ENG 227 - Topics in Language


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Study of a topic of current importance in linguistics such as language variation, world English, language and culture, language and gender, or any other area of language in society. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each semester’s subject and credit.
  
  •  

    ENG 240 - Teaching Young Adult Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of young adult literature and its application in middle and secondary school curricula. Students will create and share teaching materials, such as lesson plans, study guides, writing assignments, and exams. ENG 240 addresses state licensure requirements for some levels of teaching communication arts and literature. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    ENG 250 - English Grammar and Usage


    (2 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the basic concepts and elements of English grammar and usage. The primary purpose is to develop students’ abilities to understand grammar from a formal perspective. This course prepares students for ENG 328 - English Syntax .
  
  •  

    ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies


    (5 S.H.)

    An introductory course in literary analysis, focusing on the major genres and introducing literary history, methods of interpretation, and research and documentation. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.
  
  •  

    ENG 301 - British Literature to 1660


    (3 S.H.)

    A literary-history survey course of early English literature from the Old English period to the early 17th century. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ENG 302 - Enlightenment, Revolution, and Enslavement


    (3 S.H.)

    A literary-history survey of the “long eighteenth century” in a transatlantic context. This course covers the diverse body of English-language literature from the English Civil War through the French Revolution. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ENG 303 - British and American Romanticism


    (3 S.H.)

    A literary-history survey spanning from the late18th century to the middle 19th century in American and British literature. This course covers Romanticism, Transcendentalism, and the “American Renaissance.” Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ENG 304 - Victorian and post-Civil War Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    A literary-history survey of mid- to late-19th century literature in England and America, this course covers selected major writers, works, and genres. The course also surveys aesthetic concepts and historical contexts associated with British literature of the Victorian period and with American literature from the mid-1800s to the turn of the century. Prerequisites: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ENG 305 - Modernism and Beyond


    (3 S.H.)

    A literary-history survey of Modernism in England, Ireland, and America. This course concentrates on selected writers and works of the early to middle 1900s and covers aesthetic concepts and historical contexts that frame studies of Modernist literature. The course may also address questions of Postmodernism and dynamics of late 20th- century literature. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ENG 308 - Playwriting/Scriptwriting


    (3 S.H.)

    Study and practice in the techniques and forms of playwriting for the stage and scriptwriting for the camera; reading and writing a variety of short plays and screenplays. Prerequisite:  ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing .
  
  •  

    ENG 309 - Nonfiction Prose Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    Study and practice in the techniques and forms of nonfiction prose; reading and writing a variety of essay and nonfiction prose genres. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  
  •  

    ENG 312 - Poetry Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    Study and practice in the techniques and forms of poetry writing with emphasis on contemporary approaches. Prerequisite:   .
  
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    ENG 324 - Projects in Writing and Language – Writing in the Digital Age


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Special projects in writing, publishing, and/or language, including such work as tutoring writing, teaching English as a Second Language, editing literary publications, or other similar undertakings. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing .
  
  •  

    ENG 325 - Works of Literature


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Concentrating on a single major work of literature or on a small set of connected literary works, this course provides not only an intensive exploration of the work(s) in question, but also, as relevant, study of the author, composition, historical milieu, and critical reception of the piece, as well as apt theoretical approaches thereto. Variable content: Semester schedules announce section’s subject and credit. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
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    ENG 326 - Writers of Literature


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Concentrating on a major or a compelling minor literary figure, this course addresses the biography and selected writings by the writer whose historical period, generic orientations, and cultural contexts are covered. Topics bearing on authorial intention, compositional process, and theoretical approaches may also be treated. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
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    ENG 327 - Genres of Literature


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Narrowing literary studies to the treatment of a specific mode, style, genre, or sub-genre, this course is intended to educate students in both the historical manifestations of that literary category and the historical, abstract definitions thereof. Accordingly, the course concerns issues of genre study and its complexities. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject and credit. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ENG 328 - English Syntax


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to the structure of English as described by modern linguists. The course aims to develop students’ ability to analyze and describe English and to apply syntactic knowledge of English to stylistic analyses of texts. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing .
  
  •  

    ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an introduction to the study of language from a linguistic standpoint. Topics include phonetics, phonology, morphology, semantics, pragmatics, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language acquisition, and language and culture. This introduction to linguistics prepares students for further studies in the field. Meets GOAL 5. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing .
  
  •  

    △ ENG 390 - Modern Literary Criticism


    (3 S.H.)

    Following students’ introduction to literary-critical methodologies in ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies  and coinciding with students’ exercise of those approaches in various upper-division classes, this course covers—through readings in and about 20th century literary theory and criticism—major figures, ideas, and movements from New Criticism to the present. In this reading- and writing-intensive course, students produce papers that, from defined critical perspectives, interpret literary works by applying theoretical paradigms. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ENG 399 - Internship


    (1-12 S.H.)

    Supervised, practical experience in a wide variety of fields. Must be arranged well in advance of the registration period. P/NC at the instructor’s discretion.
  
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    ◎ ENG 402 - Teaching English in Middle School and Secondary School


    (4 S.H.)

    A study of the goals and methods of the middle school and secondary English teacher and the content and structure of the middle school and secondary English curriculum. ENG 402 addresses state licensure requirements for some levels of teaching communication arts and literature. This course should be taken after completing as much of the Professional Education sequence as possible. Prerequisites: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies  with a “B” or higher and instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    ENG 404 - Advanced Creative Writing: Nonfiction


    (3 S.H.)

    Advanced practice in writing and revising creative nonfiction, with an emphasis on the development of the student’s individual style. Variable content depends on the discretion of the instructor. Examples of other topics may include nature writing, the spiritual memoir, and travel writing. Prerequisite: ENG 309 - Nonfiction Prose Writing .
  
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    ENG 405 - Chaucer


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of Chaucer’s major works (including The Canterbury Tales) read in Middle English. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
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    ENG 410 - Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction


    (3 S.H.)

    Opportunity to produce a significant body of new fiction and develop a literary aesthetic and philosophy. Application of various expressive, imitative, and experimental writing techniques. Prerequisite: ENG 310 - Story Writing .
  
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    ENG 412 - Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry


    (3 S.H.)

    Advanced study of selected poets and poetics; advanced practice in poetry writing. Prerequisite: ENG 312 - Poetry Writing .
  
  •  

    △ ENG 414 - Shakespeare: Comedies and Histories


    (3 S.H.)

    Study of Shakespeare’s major comedies and history plays.
    Prerequisite:  .
  
  •  

    △ ENG 417 - Shakespeare’s Works


    (3 S.H.)

    The course will be based upon careful consideration and discussion of Shakespeare’s works, both the printed texts and filmed versions. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ENG 423 - Shakespeare in Performance


    (3 S.H.)

    This intensive two-week course is based on careful reading and discussion of Shakespeare’s plays and their performances; the choice of plays for the course will correspond to the offerings of the Great River Shakespeare Festival. This course entails extra fees. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    △ ENG 432 - Literature in a Global Context


    (3 S.H.)

    Examination of texts within their cultural contexts and exploration of strategies for comparing texts from various cultural traditions. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    △ ENG 439 - Technical Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    The theory and practice of creating technical documents with text and graphics such as proposals, reviews, reports, newsletters, descriptions, instructions, manuals, websites, and/or correspondence. Using available technology (hardware and software), students will develop these documents with attention to their personal, organizational, cultural, legal, and ethical consequences. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing .
  
  •  

    ENG 461 - Independent Studies


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Independent studies determined by the needs of the individual student. Offered by previous arrangement only. A student may earn no more than 6 S.H. through independent studies. Prerequisite: ◆ ENG 290 - Literary Studies .
  
  •  

    ◎ ENG 470 - Seminar in American Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    This reading- and writing-intensive course offers advanced study of a period, genre, figure, or theme in American literature and includes seminar-style presentations by students. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisites: △ ENG 390 - Modern Literary Criticism .
  
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    ◎ ENG 471 - Seminar in British Literature


    (3 S.H.)

    This reading- and writing-intensive course offers advanced study of a period, genre, figure, or theme in British literature and includes seminar-style presentations by students. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisites: △ ENG 390 - Modern Literary Criticism  .
  
  •  

    △ ENG 472 - Seminar in Language Study and Discourse


    (3 S.H.)

    Advanced study of topics in language and linguistics. Topics may include history of the English language, sociolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language and social context, contrastive rhetoric, pragmatics, and language and culture. Variable content: Semester schedules announce each section’s subject. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study  or instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    △ ENG 480 - Theories of Second Language Acquisition


    (3 S.H.)

    This course introduces students to core issues in second language acquisition and research. Students work to understand what is occurring linguistically, cognitively, and socially as humans learn languages beyond their native language. The course focuses on both theoretical and pragmatic interactions among learner, language, and context. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study  or instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    ◎ ENG 481 - TESOL Theory and Methods


    (3 S.H.)

    The course examines theories, methods, and techniques of teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL), including psychological, socio-cultural, political, and pedagogical factors affecting learning and teaching and the influence of these factors on current teaching practice. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study  or instructor’s permission.
  
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    ENG 482 - Second Language Composition Studies


    (3 S.H.)

    The course is a survey of theories of second language writing, including analysis of theoretical perspectives and pedagogical materials. This may also include application of TESOL theory and methods to the teaching of composition. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study  or instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    ◆ ENG 483 - Pedagogical Grammar


    (3 S.H.)

    In this course, students examine the structural features of English as they apply to the teaching and learning of English as a second or foreign language. The primary focus is on explaining grammatical concepts within pedagogical contexts. Prior experience in the formal study of English grammar is necessary background for this course. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 328 - English Syntax  or instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    ENG 484 - ESL Materials, Resources, and Assessment


    (3 S.H.)

    The major focus of this course is the examination of theories and principles guiding successful ESL material development and language test creation. Students typically practice developing their own course materials, evaluate their suitability in a sample lesson, and prepare tests for a variety of student levels. Prerequisites: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and ENG 350 - Introduction to Language Study  or instructor’s permission.
  
  •  

    ENG 490 - Portfolio


    (1 S.H.)

    Students compile portfolio materials including a vita, a critical introduction, and selected papers and projects from their former coursework. Required of all English majors as a capstone project in the senior year. Grade only.

Film

  
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    FILM 140 - Approaches to Film


    (3 S.H.)

    A general introduction to the art of the film, the course addresses elements of narrative, composition, design, cinematography, acting, directing, editing, theory, and criticism.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only.
  
  •  

    FILM 240 - Film Genres


    (3 S.H.)

    Studies in a specific genre, such as the Western, screwball comedy, horror, war, melodrama, or noir film, with the individual topic(s) announced in the course schedule.  Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. May be repeated as topics change.
  
  
  •  

    FILM 399 - Internship


    (1-12 S.H.)

    Supervised, practical experience in film research, analysis, criticism, production, distribution, promotion, or exhibition. Must be arranged well in advance of the registration period. A student may apply no more than 6 S.H. of internship credits towards the Film Studies minor. Prerequisites: Requires instructor’s permission. P/NC.
  
  •  

    FILM 461 - Independent Studies


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Independent studies in film determined by the needs of the individual student. A student may earn no more than 6 s.h. through independent studies in film. Prerequisites: Requires instructor’s permission. Grade only.

Finance

  
  •  

    FIN 201 - Introduction to Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the financial system in the U.S. including the role of the banking system in controlling the supply of money and interest rate determination, a primer on investments, and an introductory discussion of international finance. Not open to those having 15 or more credits in business. Grade only.
  
  
  •  

    FIN 340 - Computer Applications in Finance


    (1 S.H.)

    A series of short courses in the effective use of the SAS System in a PC environment. Alternative course topics include basic data handling, regression analysis, forecasting techniques, and survey tabulation and analysis, etc. Requires completion of several project assignments. May be repeated as topics change. Prerequisite: Admission to the College of Business, ◆ ECON 222 - Statistics for Business and Economics , or STAT 210 - Statistics . Grade only.
  
  •  

    FIN 360 - Corporate Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    The theory and practice of corporate finance, using the approaches and quantitative methods required of today’s financial managers and decision-makers. Special emphasis on a theory of value, the determinants of risk, return and the opportunity cost of capital, applied to both real and financial assets, the study of leverage issues, the exploitation of market inefficiencies, and the development of various tools and economic reasoning which provide the basis for a wide range of corporate financial decisions. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business,  ECON 202 - Principles of Macroeconomics . Grade only.
  
  •  

    ◆ FIN 377 - Investments


    (3 S.H.)

    Investment policies affecting the individual and institutional investor. Includes the analysis and management of stocks, bonds, mutual funds and other investments, and the nature of security markets.

      Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.

  
  •  

    FIN 390 - Intermediate Corporate Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    A blend of theory and applications to assist financial decision makers. This course covers long-term investment decisions, capital structure issues, long-term financing, and short-term management in the context of a global orientation. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.
  
  •  

    FIN 398 - Internship


    (1-6 S.H.)

    Credits are not counted in the finance major, but as general elective credit. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and concurrent enrollment in FIN 399 - Internship Problem . P/NC only.
  
  •  

    FIN 399 - Internship Problem


    (3 S.H.)

    Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business, completion of business core courses, 2.5 GPA, and instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
  •  

    FIN 404 - Commercial Bank Management


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of financial management issues of commercial banks and other financial institutions including institution performance, investments, asset/liability strategies, management of liquidity, securities, loans and other assets, and capital, deposits, and other sources of funds. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
  •  

    ◎ FIN 421 - Institutional Investment and Financial Markets


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of portfolio management decision-making in this age of innovative global financial markets, new financial instruments and instantaneous worldwide communications. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.
  
  •  

    FIN 422 - Portfolio Theory and Security Valuation


    (3 S.H.)

    An in-depth study of modern portfolio theory and techniques for the valuation of securities including equity, debt, and derivative securities. Special emphasis is placed on the contingent claims model for security valuation. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business, ◆ FIN 377 - Investments , and MIS 362 - Management Information Systems , or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
  •  

    FIN 423 - Derivative Securities


    (3 S.H.)

    The application and valuation of financial securities whose value is contingent on the value of other securities. The primary concentration is on option and futures contracts; however, application of the option valuation model to other areas of finance will also be introduced. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business, MATH 140 - Applied Calculus  or MATH 212 - Calculus I , and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.
  
  •  

    FIN 440 - International Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides a comprehensive introduction to the world of financial management as it applies to multinational corporations and other firms that engage in international transactions. Topics include the nature of the international financial system, foreign exchange management, investment financing, and risk management issues of concern to international businesses. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.
  
  
  •  

    FIN 471 - Real Estate Finance


    (3 S.H.)

    The structure and operation of the primary and secondary mortgage markets, instruments, techniques, and strategies in financing real property investments including developing projects. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.
  
  •  

    FIN 473 - Real Estate Investment


    (3 S.H.)

    Development of the feasibility process, the major tool used in analysis of investment opportunities, with a view to determining highest and best use. Topics include market analysis, cash flow analysis, tax considerations, investment performance, risk analysis, and passive investments in real estate. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and FIN 360 - Corporate Finance . Grade only.
  
  •  

    FIN 480 - Independent Studies in Finance


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Offers advanced students an opportunity to do additional reading and/or research in areas of special interest. Prerequisites: Admission to the College of Business and instructor’s permission. Total credits may not exceed six. Grade only.

Foreign Language

  
  •  

    FLAN 405 - Methods of Teaching a Modern Foreign Language


    (4 S.H.)

    Discussion of foreign language teaching methods with respect to their effectiveness in achieving pedagogical goals. Practical applications are offered. Must be taken before the student teaching assignment. Prerequisite: SPAN 202 - Intermediate Spanish II  or equivalent. Offered every two years.

French

  
  •  

    FREN 101 - Elementary French I


    (4 S.H.)

    Introductory French for students with little or no prior French training. Instruction in speaking, listening, reading, and writing through classroom drills and language lab work. Meets GOAL 8. Prerequisite: None. Offered yearly.
  
  
  •  

    FREN 201 - Intermediate French I


    (4 S.H.)

    Further development of communication skills. In-depth study of grammar. Selected readings in French. Meets GOAL 8. Prerequisite: FREN 102 - Elementary French II  or equivalent of three years of high school French. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    FREN 202 - Intermediate French II


    (4 S.H.)

    Continuation of FREN 201 - Intermediate French I . Further development of all the skills essential for communication. Further development of understanding written and spoken French. Practice in translation and practice in writing accentuated. Meets GOAL 8. Prerequisite: FREN 201 - Intermediate French I  or equivalent of 4-5 years of high school French. Offered yearly.

Geography

  
  •  

    GEOG 110 - World Regional Geography


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of physical and cultural aspects of world regions including landforms; climate; levels of economic development; cultural diffusion; attitudes toward the land, the social structure, and values. Meets GOAL 5.

    Effective Spring 2014: Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered yearly.

  
  •  

    GEOG 211 - Economic Geography


    (3 S.H.)

    A systematic study of the geographic bases of human economic activities in agriculture, mining, and manufacturing. This course explains—by theory and example—why, where, and how activities are distributed in our economic world. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    GEOG 212 - Physical Geography


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the significance and aerial distribution of various physical elements of our environment with emphasis on climate, landforms, gradational work of streams, and glaciation. Meets GOAL 5.

    Effective Spring 2014: Meets Goal 10. Grade only. Offered yearly.

  
  •  

    GEOG 213 - Cultural Geography


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the significance and aerial distribution of various cultural elements of our environment with emphasis on population, cultural origins, language, religion, and agriculture. Meets GOAL 5.

    Effective Spring 2014: Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered yearly.

  
  •  

    GEOG 223 - Geography of the Orient


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the physical and cultural features of the Far East. Meets GOAL 7.

    Effective Spring 2014: Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered every other year.

  
  •  

    GEOG 224 - Geography of Africa


    (3 S.H.)

    Natural setting, distribution of people, important occupations and problems of Africa’s future development.

    Effective Spring 2014: Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered every other year.

  
  •  

    GEOG 225 - Geography of Latin America


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the complex cultural, racial, political, demographic, and economic patterns which have developed in Latin American since 1492— within its physical geographic setting.  Meets GOAL 7.

    Effective Spring 2014: Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered yearly.

  
  •  

    GEOG 233 - Geography of the Middle East


    (3 S.H.)

    Environmental setting, population distribution, important occupations, crossroads, functions, and problems of development.

    Effective Spring 2014: Meets GOAL 8. Grade only. Offered every other year.

  
  •  

    GEOG 270 - Introduction to the Geography of Tourism


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to the study of the geography of tourism. This course studies the origin, development, and spread of tourism. Particular emphasis is placed on the location of tourist areas in the U.S. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
  •  

    GEOG 320 - Geography of the United States


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the various regions of the United States with emphasis on the ways in which physical geography, sources of economic activity, and cultural heritage combine to produce the unique character of each region. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    GEOG 326 - Geography of Europe


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of nations, regions, and economies of Europe with special attention to current problem areas. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    GEOG 332 - Geography of Canada


    (3 S.H.)

    A detailed examination of Canada’s geography with special emphasis on developmental problems. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    GEOG 349 - Maps and Air Photos


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the elements of map scale and projection, and the use of air photos in map preparation. Practice in reading and interpreting various kinds and series of maps. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    GEOG 370 - The Geography of Tourism: Advanced Study


    (3 S.H.)

    An in-depth study of tourist locations worldwide. The course emphasizes detailed examination and classification of tourist types and locations. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    GEOG 450 - Cartography


    (3 S.H.)

    Theory and design of map-making skills using a variety of techniques in the production and reproduction of qualitative and quantitative maps. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    GEOG 455 - Remote Sensing


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of various remote sensing techniques including radar, infrared, high-altitude photography and LANDSAT earth satellite imagery, and their application to geographical inquiry in areas such as land use, agriculture, forest and range management, and urban studies. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered every other year.
  
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    GEOG 490 - Independent Reading in Geography


    (1-3 S.H.)

    A course designed to aid those planning to attend graduate school or who have a special area of interest which they desire to pursue beyond formal course limits. Work is undertaken with an instructor chosen by the student. Prerequisite: Instructor’s permission. Grade only. Offered by arrangement.

Geoscience

  
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    GEOS 090 - Earth Talks Speaker Series


    0 S.H.

    The course entails student attendance to the Earth Talks Speaker Series hosted each semester by the Geoscience Department. The series serves as a forum through which experts from academia, government, and the private sector, as well as WSU students and faculty, share their experiences and research results with the WSU Geoscience community. The series also provides a venue for discussions of professional, educational, and employment issues related to Geology, Natural Resources, Earth Science teaching, and other related disciplines. Offered each semester Note: Waivers to the normal number of required enrollments are considered by the Department Chair. For example, waivers will be granted as necessary for transfer students who will not be in residence at WSU for six semester. Repeatable: Grade of “P” in six enrollments normally required of Geoscience and Earth Science (Teaching) majors; four enrollments normally required of Geoscience minors.
  
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    GEOS 100 - Minnesota’s Rocks and Waters


    (3 S.H.)

    Introduction to Minnesota’s geological history focusing on such topics as Minnesota’s rock record and history, fossils, mining, soils, lakes, rivers and ground water. Meets GOAL 3. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Grade only. Offered with sufficient demand.
  
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    GEOS 102 - Resources of the Earth


    (3 S.H.)

    An exploration of historic, current, and future global resources. Discussions cover renewable and non-renewable material and energy resources. Geologic processes, environmental impacts, and economic considerations for each are explored.  Meets GOAL 10. Includes laboratory simulations and/or field experiences. Grade only. Offered yearly.
 

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