Oct 26, 2021  
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog 
    
2013-2014 Undergraduate Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Course Descriptions


Course descriptions include the following elements:

Course Code,  Number, and Titles: The course code indicates the department or program in which the course is housed. The course number indicates the level at which the course should be taken. Generally, first-year students take 100-level courses; sophomores, 200-level; juniors, 300-level; and seniors, 400-level. Students are required to limit course selection to courses not more than one level above their class standing. First-year students are not permitted to enroll in 400-level courses. Undergraduate students who need 12 or fewer semester credits to complete all baccalaureate degree requirements may request permission from the Director of Graduate Studies to take courses for graduate credit to complete a regular course load during the semester of  graduation. However, undergraduate students may not enroll in courses at the 600-level or 700-level.

Credits: The number of semester hours of credit given upon completion of the course.

Course Content: A brief description of subject matter gives students an idea of what to expect in the course.

Prerequisites: If required or recommended, a prerequisite is either a course that must be completed prior to enrolling in the course or some other requirement that must be met prior to enrolling in the course.

Grading Method: If a course is offered on a grade-only or pass/no credit-only basis, that status is included in the course description. A department’s general pass/no credit policy is included in its listing of program requirements. Students should check the policy before enrolling in a course on a pass/no credit basis.

Frequency of Offering: Course descriptions may indicate how often the course is offered.

Note:

◎= Oral Intensive

◆ = Math/Critical Analysis Intensive

△ = Writing Intensive

✽ = Physical Development and Wellness Graduation Requirement

 

Health, Exercise and Rehabilitative Sciences

  
  
  
  •  

    HERS 385 - Senior Seminar: Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation


    (3 S.H.)

    Focuses on the analysis of the relationships between concepts in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation. Emphasis is placed upon helping students integrate these concepts into their professional procedure via major paper, case studies, and special presentations. Prerequisites: Senior standing and instructor’s permission. Offered fall semester only.
  
  
  •  

    HERS 390 - Movement Science Research Design


    (4 S.H.)

    A detailed overview of the research process including discussion of research in movement science, literature review development, statement of the research problem, formulating the methods, writing the results, and discussion. Completion of human subjects review committee application forms as needed, and completion of subject informed consent. Additionally, application of frequently used statistical tests including correlation, regression analysis, t-tests, analysis of variance, analysis of covariance, and post-hoc comparisons will be covered. Prerequisites: HERS 314 - Anatomical Kinesiology , △ HERS 340 - Physiology of Exercise , HERS 370 - Mechanical Kinesiology , ◎ HERS 380 - Laboratory Methods in Exercise Science , STAT 110 - Fundamentals of Statistics .

    Effective Spring 2014: HERS 314, HERS 340, STAT 110 and junior academic standing. Preferred prerequisites: HERS 370 and HERS 380. Grade only. Offered spring semester only.

  
  
  
  •  

    HERS 393 - Therapeutic Modalities


    (3 S.H.)

    Exploration of pain theories, inflammation and the injury cycle. Physiological and mechanical theories of therapeutic modalities are defined and the effects of therapeutic modalities on athletic injuries throughout the injury cycle are applied. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program; BIOL 211 - Anatomy and Physiology I  and BIOL 212 - Anatomy and Physiology II . Offered yearly.
  
  
  
  •  

    HERS 420 - Clinical Exercise Testing and Prescription


    (4 S.H.)

    Emphasizes methods, procedures and techniques of functional and diagnostic exercise stress testing. For normal, cardiopulmonary, and other special populations, consideration is given for contraindications, pharmacological intervention, protocol selection, equipment selection, data interpretation, follow-up procedures, and exercise prescription. Lecture and lab. Prerequisites: HERS 344 - Electrocardiography  and ◎ HERS 380 - Laboratory Methods in Exercise Science . Grade only. Offered spring semester only.
  
  
  •  

    HERS 464 - Winona Survivors Unite in Exercise Practicum


    (1 S.H.)

    Winona Survivors Unite in Exercise Practicum experience is designed for student to gain hands on experience working with clients in the Women Survivors Unite in Exercise program (WSUE). The WSUE program meets two times/week at the Integrated Wellness Complex. Students will understand and perform emergency procedures, develop individualized exercise prescriptions, collect initial and follow-up physical assessments, and gain knowledge of treatment, procedures, and side-effects for cancer patients. Prerequisites: HERS 280 - Foundations of Exercise Science , △ HERS 340 - Physiology of Exercise , ◆ HERS 368 - Pathophysiology for the Health Professions , ◎ HERS 380 - Laboratory Methods in Exercise Science  (can be taken concurrently), and senior academic standing. Grade only. Offered each semester. Note:  

    This course was previously listed as Women Survivors Unite in Exercise Practicum. Previous description: Women Survivors Unite in Exercise Practicum experience is designed for student to gain hands on experience working with clients in the Women Survivors Unite in Exercise program (WSUE). The WSUE program meets two times/week at the Integrated Wellness Center. Students will understand and perform emergency procedures, develop individualized exercise prescriptions, collect initial and follow-up physical assessments, and gain knowledge of treatment, procedures, and side-effects for breast cancer patients.

  
  
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    HERS 490 - Independent Study in Exercise Science


    (1-4 S.H.)

    Opportunity for undergraduates to work independently. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, preparation of proposed outline, and major advisor’s permission. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  
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    HERS 492 - Administration of Athletic Training


    (3 S.H.)

    Designed to prepare athletic training students for the behind-the-scenes duties that are required to ensure that an athletic program is functioning efficiently and properly. Areas covered include liability, budgeting, record-keeping, and other administrative areas. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program; ◎ HERS 392 - Injury Recognition of the Lower Body . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  •  

    △ HERS 494 - Therapeutic Interventions


    (4 S.H.)

    Anatomical review and discussion of mechanisms, specific injuries, their acute treatment and referral process for conditions related to the head, face, ear, eye, nose, throat thorax, abdomen, and skin. In-depth instruction and review into the physiology and pathology of each condition for each body system. Intervention techniques for athletes suffering physical, emotional, or psychological illnesses will be discussed. Basic pharmacological principles will be discussed along with the actions and side-effects of commonly used drugs; action for abuse and testing will also be included. Prerequisites: Acceptance into the Athletic Training Program; ◎ HERS 392 - Injury Recognition of the Lower Body  and PSY 210 - Introduction to Psychological Science . Grade only. Offered spring semester only.
  
  
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    HERS 497 - Internship in Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation


    (1-12 S.H.)

    A capstone experience to foster the culmination of skills and abilities necessary for the entry-level cardiopulmonary clinical experience physiologist. Six hundred hours of clinical experience are required in the ACSM certified exercise specialist learner outcomes. Internship clinical sites are nationally located and an internship handbook details application, registration, and evaluation procedures. Prerequisites: Senior standing, liability insurance, current CPR and First Aid certification, all major coursework completed, and instructor’s permission. P/NC.
  
  •  

    HERS 498 - Internship in Athletic Training


    (1-12 S.H.)

    A capstone experience to foster the culmination of skills and abilities necessary for the entry-level athletic training professional. With an in-depth view of an athletic trainer’s role in the sports medicine clinic with opportunities to interact with physicians, physician assistants, physical therapists, other personnel and a diverse patient population under the direct supervision of a BOC-Certified Athletic Trainer. Opportunities for special projects, presentations and viewing surgeries may also be available.  An internship handbook details admission, registration, and evaluation procedures. Prerequisites: Senior standing, liability insurance, current CPR and First Aid certification, all major coursework must be completed, and instructor’s permission. P/NC.
  
  •  

    HERS 499 - Internship in Exercise Science


    (1-12 S.H.)

    A capstone experience in exercise science to foster the culmination of skills and abilities necessary for the entry-level exercise science professional. This is a full semester of field experience. Prerequisites: Senior standing, liability insurance, current CPR and First Aid certification, all major coursework must be completed, and instructor’s permission. P/NC. Offered each semester.

Health Promotion

  
  •  

    ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to provide the student with a broad spectrum of pertinent personal and public health topics and issues. Principles and concepts related to health behavior are stressed. Included are topics such as improved mental/emotional health, dietary practices, physical fitness, prevention, reduced risk and control of diseases. The use of alcohol, tobacco, and other drugs, with an emphasis on prevention strategies and personal guideline development is specifically stressed as mandated by Minnesota State Law 126.06. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  •  

    HERS 288 - Health Perspectives


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to health education and health promotion. Analyzes the foundations of the discipline of health education including theories of health education. Explores the theories of behavior change. Investigates the career opportunities in all health education/promotion settings. Introduces professional organizations and certifications for the field of health education including worksite health promotion. Upon successful completion of this course, students will (1) understand the many different theories of health, (2) know the history and philosophy of health education/health promotion, and (3) be exposed to several health working documents. Prerequisite: ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health . Effective Spring 2014: No prerequisites required. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    HERS 312 - School & Community Health


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with a foundation in the theory and practice of community health promotion. Students will have the opportunity to develop their understanding of the socio-cultural, political, and economic factors involved in community health. By the end of the course, students will have the theoretical and practical background necessary to enable them to play a coordinating and facilitating role in planning and implementing effective community health promotion initiatives. Prerequisites: ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health  and HERS 288 - Health Perspectives . Grade only. Offered spring semester only.
  
  
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    △ HERS 316 - Introduction to Public Health


    (3 S.H.)

    A foundation course that introduces students to the concept, history and practice of public health. The course examines the environmental, social, political and behavioral determinants of heath and disease from a population perspective. It also looks at options for intervening to maintain the public’s health through the use of the health care, public health environmental health and safety systems as well as laws and taxation. Prerequisites: ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health  and HERS 288 - Health Perspectives  and ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  . Grade only. Offered yearly. Note:

     

  
  
  
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    HERS 320 - Health Education in the Elementary Schools


    (3 S.H.)

    Designing Pre-8 educational programs consistent with specified program objectives, includes development of logical scope and sequence plan for an elementary health education program. Applying individual or group learning process methods appropriate to given early childhood, elementary and middle school level learning situations. Proper techniques and skills needed to successfully meet the National Health Education Standards and the Minnesota State Graduation Standards. Upon successful completion of this course, students will (1) know the Coordinated School Health Program, (2) apply methodology of Elementary Health Education, and (3) know and understand the process of writing lesson plans. Prerequisite: ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    HERS 321 - Health Education in the Middle & Secondary Schools


    (3 S.H.)

    Future school health professionals will learn the best practices of health curriculum for middle school and secondary students. Students will learn to specify objectives, develop sequential learning activities, create challenging and motivating lessons, and develop a curriculum for middle and/or secondary schools. Students will learn to apply individual and group learning process methods appropriate for middle school and high school students. Students will also learn proper techniques and skills needed to successfully meet the National Health Education Standards and the Minnesota State Graduation Standards. Upon successful completion of this course, students will (1) know the Coordinated School Health Program, (2) be able to apply methodology of Middle/Secondary Health Education, and (3) know and understand the process of writing and implementing lesson plans. Prerequisites: ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health , HERS 288 - Health Perspectives , and HERS 320 - Health Education in the Elementary Schools . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    HERS 326 - Educational Topics/Issues


    (2 S.H.)

    In-depth study of current and emerging health topics in health education and promotion. Study of bio-psycho-social issues related to such topics as addiction, sexuality education, and violence prevention. Students utilize computerized health information retrieval systems and access online and other database health information resources. Upon successful completion of this course, students will have an educated position on the most important current public health issues. They will also be able to argue knowledgeably and coherently in support of their position and be able to give accurate information about the issues studied. Prerequisites: ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health  and HERS 288 - Health Perspectives . Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
  
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    △ HERS 350 - Program Planning in Health Promotion


    (3 S.H.)

    This is a practical course in which students are responsible for undertaking needs assessment research and developing a health promotion program in collaboration with a local business or agency. The course enables students to apply the knowledge and experience gained in lower level courses to real world problems and to further develop their health promotion/health communication skills. Prerequisites: ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health , Health Promotion: School Health and Public Health Majors only: HERS 288 - Health Perspectives . Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
  
  
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    HERS 415 - Grant Writing


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the skills required to locate funding opportunities and write and submit grant applications and reports for health promotion and education programs. This course is designed to help students to gain experience and practice in finding grant money and applying for grants to undertake community health projects. Prerequisites: Students must have senior standing. Grade only. Offered yearly.
  
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    HERS 425 - Organization and Administration of School Health


    (3 S.H.)

    Organization and administrative aspects of an effective school health education/promotion program pertaining to budgets, personnel, facilities, legal responsibilities, home/school/community communications, and the formulation of practical modes of collaboration among educational settings. Includes the creation and development of scope and sequence as applied to the Minnesota State Graduation Standards and the National Health Standards. Upon successful completion of this course, students will (1) understand the policy and procedures required to be an administrator in the area of health education; (2) become knowledgeable regarding curriculum development; and (3) become both an advocate and a resource person for health education, upholding state standards and recommendations. Prerequisites: ✽ HERS 204 - Personal & Community Health , HERS 288 - Health Perspectives , and  HERS 312 - School & Community Health . Grade Only. Offered yearly.
  
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    HERS 431 - Health Issues Workshop


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Explores recent and relevant issues, trends and programming developments in health education/promotion. Designed for teachers, school nurses, school administrators, undergraduates and/or graduate students. Upon successful completion of this course, students will (1) create, develop, and oversee the workings of health conferences; (2) professionally represent Winona State University; and (3) be able to work through the evaluation process of conferences and conventions. Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing. May be repeated for credit. Offered upon demand.
  
  
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    HERS 490 - Independent Study in Health


    (1-3 S.H.)

    Opportunities for undergraduates to work on an advanced health issue, research or with technology/presentation methods. Prerequisites: Junior or senior standing, preparation of proposed outline, permission of the major advisor and the Department chairperson. Grade only. Offered upon demand.
  
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    HERS 496 - Internship in Community Health


    (10-12 S.H.)

    A capstone experience in Community Health to foster the culmination of skills and abilities necessary for the entry level Community Health Educator in a Health agency or organization. Prerequisites: Senior standing, all major coursework completed and approved by the Health Promotion faculty, and instructor’s permission. P/NC.

History

  
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    HIST 101 - Introduction to Law and Society


    (1 S.H.)

    An introduction to interdisciplinary studies as it relates to the law and society major. Students will examine a series of historical and contemporary legal issues from a variety of disciplinary perspectives. This course is required of all law and society majors. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 120 - Western Civilization to 1500


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of Western traditions and institutions from their beginnings in Egypt and Mesopotamia through Greece, Rome and the Middle Ages.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    HIST 121 - Western Civilization 1500-1815


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of the European Renaissance, Protestant Reformation, development of the nation state, the Enlightenment, Commercial and Industrial Revolution, the French Revolution and the Napoleonic era. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    HIST 122 - Western Civilization 1815 to Present


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of European traditions and institutions from the fall of Napoleon to the present, stressing the Industrial Revolution, nationalism, imperialism, the rise of totalitarianism, World War II, the Cold War and post-Cold War problems. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    HIST 123 - East Asian Civilization


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of China, Korea, and Japan from the pre-modern era to the present. The course analyzes traditional institutions and values and responses to Western imperialism. Topics include Japan’s Meiji Restoration and expansionism, Japanese colonial rule in Korea, traditional China’s collapse and revolutionary movements, World War II, the Korean War, China’s Communist reconstruction and post-communist economy, the continued partition of the Korean Peninsula, North Korean nuclear ambitions, and Japan’s re-emergence as a world power. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 125 - Classical History


    (3 S.H.)

    The history of Greece from the Homeric time of Plato to the Roman Republic. Meets GOAL 9. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 150 - United States History to 1865


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of United States history from prehistoric times to the American Civil War. Special emphasis is placed on political developments and public policy as well as the origins and consequences of slavery and ethnic, cultural, and regional diversity and conflict. Also emphasized is the transformation of social and economic systems. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 6 (Humanities). Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of United States history since the American Civil War with special emphasis on post-Civil War Reconstruction, late 19th-century economic and social developments and 20th-century reform movements. Additionally, foreign policy and the overseas expansion of the U.S. economy receive attention, as do Cold War and post-Cold War developments.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 7. Grade only. Offered each semester.
  
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    HIST 165 - Latin American History


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of Latin American history from pre-Columbian times to present including the colonial period, the struggle for independence and the rise of modern Latin American nations. Special emphasis is placed on Argentina, Brazil, Chile and Mexico.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 170 - African Civilization


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of African history from prehistoric times to the present. The emphasis is on African social, cultural, and political history. The periods of study include Africa in the ancient world, medieval Africa, the slave trade, the era of European colonialism, the rise of nationalism, and independence movements and contemporary Africa. Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 8. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 214 - The Mississippi River in U.S. History


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of the significance of the Mississippi River in U.S. history. The course emphasizes the role of the river in Native American life and early European exploration of the Midwest, and the efforts of European powers and the newly created U.S. to control the river. The course also studies the role of the river in economic change, slavery, pre-Civil War immigration, and federal policy. The course will also consider the western theater of the Civil War; the post-war bridging of the river and industrial development along it; and its 20th century flooding, damning, and related controversies.  Meets GOAL 5 and GOAL 10. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 215 - Minnesota History


    (3 S.H.)

    History of the land and people of Minnesota. Emphasis is on social, cultural, economic, and political history of indigenous and immigrant groups in Minnesota during the 19th and 20th centuries. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 220 - Introduction to African-American History


    (3 S.H.)

    This course will introduce students to African American history. It examines the full breadth of African American history, starting with Africa in the years before the international slave trade and concluding with the Civil Rights movement and more recent developments in the United States. History majors and minors may count this class among their history electives. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 7. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 235 - History of the American Indian


    (3 S.H.)

    This course traces the history of Native Americans from pre-Columbian times forward to the present day. It emphasizes both the broad, shared experience of natives, regardless of tribal identity, and the more particular experience of individual tribal groups, especially those of the Upper Midwest and Plains regions. Meets GOAL 6 (Humanities) and GOAL 7. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 298 - Historical Research Methods and Historiography


    (3 S.H.)

    An introduction to historical research and criticism that exposes students to the sources, resources and techniques of research and evaluation of research as well as divergent historiography traditions. Prerequisites: History major or minor standing, law and society major standing, or social science/history major standing, ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  , and instructor’s permission. Limited to 20 students. Grade only.
  
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    ◎ HIST 315 - Women in U.S. History


    (3 S.H.)

    A survey of the history of women in the United States, from the colonial period to the present. Topics to be covered include changing ideas about women and the changing nature of the family, sexuality, women’s political activity, and paid and unpaid work. The course also examines the way in which gender has combined with other social definitions—such as race, ethnicity and age—to shape the experiences of both men and women in U.S. history. Prerequisites: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  or HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  and ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing . Grade only.
  
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    HIST 320 - North American Indian Civilization


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines important issues in the history of North American Natives: prehistoric interactions among Native groups, Native reaction and interaction with early Europeans, cultural issues such as the outlawing of Native languages and Native customs, the American Indian Movement, the First Nations Movement, and the anti-Columbus protests. It discusses both Canada and the United States in an effort to include all North American Native groups. Prerequisite: HIST 235 - History of the American Indian . Grade only.
  
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    HIST 325 - American Diplomatic History


    (3 S.H.)

    Traces and analyzes the major developments in modern American diplomacy. The course will examine 19th-century traditions, but will focus on the impact of domestic concerns and overseas wars and revolutions on the 20th century global expansion of American interests, ideology, and power. Prerequisites: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865 , HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865 , or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 330 - Psycho-History


    (3 S.H.)

    The application of psychoanalytical theory to history. Part of the course will focus on the study of psychoanalytic theory. The rest of the course will focus on the application of theory to history. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 335 - The Holocaust


    (3 S.H.)

    An historical study and analysis of the Nazi Holocaust from 1933 to 1945.
  
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    HIST 340 - History of Christianity


    (3 S.H.)

    The development of Christianity from the time of Christ to the present, with emphasis on the interplay between Christianity and the political, economic, social, and cultural structures of various historical ages. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 341 - Modern Japan


    (3 S.H.)

    The course traces and analyzes the principal developments that shaped modern Japan. Beginning with examination of 17th- and 18th-century Tokugawa culture and institutions, the course will then explore the sources and consequences of the revolution Meiji “Restoration.” The course will then consider Japan’s march toward the Pacific War, and the post-World War II revival. Prerequisites: HIST 123 - East Asian Civilization  and ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 343 - Modern China


    (3 S.H.)

    This course permits in-depth study of the major events and issues in China’s dynamic transformation from the world’s oldest and largest bureaucracy to a revolutionary state and its subsequent evolution to the contemporary political and economic phenomenon we know today. Tracing pre-modern legacies that have helped shape China, the course covers the decline and fall of the Qing dynasty through the creation of Communist China and the unfolding of the post-Mao, so-called “reform era.” The course will also address the lesser-known areas of Tibet and Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region, as well as Hong Kong and Taiwan. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 345 - History of American Sports


    (3 S.H.)

    An historical look at the place and value of sport in American culture. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 350 - The History of Attitudes Toward Death


    (3 S.H.)

    A look at the attitudes toward death in various societies. Prerequisite: ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 355 - European Intellectual and Cultural History


    (3 S.H.)

    A study of the history of the development and basic concepts in European religious, philosophical, political, legal, scientific, and social thought and their impact on Western culture. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 360 - Introduction to Historical Museums


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with an overview of the field of historical museums and public history. It will examine the history of museums, museum management, collections care, management of historical libraries and archives, fundraising and budgeting, and the development of exhibits and public programming. It will also survey opportunities available in public history. Required student projects will make use of the resources of the Winona County Historical Society. Prerequisites: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865 . Grade only.
  
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    △ HIST 365 - American Legal History


    (3 S.H.)

    An overview of Anglo-American legal history from pre-colonial England to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the evolution of substantive law, including real property law, business law, family law, and personal injury law. The class emphasizes legal development in social, political, and economic contexts. Prerequisites: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    ◎ HIST 385 - Trial Advocacy 1


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to be an intensive introduction to United States trial law and techniques. Over three semesters, students will have the opportunity to prepare opening statements; direct examinations, cross-examinations, and closing arguments; and to practice those skills in the environment of the American Mock Trial Association intercollegiate competition. Students will earn one credit for each semester they successfully participate in the course, up to a maximum of three credits. Prerequisite: Junior standing.
  
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    HIST 390 - Historical Museum Internship


    (3-15 S.H.)

    Placement in the Winona County Historical Society Museum or other historical museum for the purpose of experience and training in the field of public history. Prerequisites: HIST 360 - Introduction to Historical Museums  and department’s permission. Internship credits may not be counted toward completion of the history major or minor.
  
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    HIST 397 - Topics in History


    (1-3 S.H.)

    In-depth study of current topics in society and the historical profession. Can be repeated with different topics. Grade only.
  
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    ◎ HIST 398 - Topics in History with Oral Communication Emphasis


    (3 S.H.)

    In-depth study of topics of current concern to historians including newer areas of research, emerging themes, and recent interpretive debates. The assignments will include an emphasis on discussion and oral presentations.
  
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    HIST 401 - Ancient Rome


    (3 S.H.)

    The rise of Rome from a small republic to empire; the decline and fall of the empire. The Roman contribution to Western civilization. Prerequisite: HIST 120 - Western Civilization to 1500  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 403 - Middle Ages


    (3 S.H.)

    The decline of the Roman Empire, the Germanic kingdoms, the early Christian Church, the development of feudalism and manorialism, the economic recovery of Europe, civilization of the High Middle Ages, rise of the national monarchies. Prerequisite: HIST 120 - Western Civilization to 1500  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
  
  
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    HIST 412 - French Revolution and Napoleon


    (3 S.H.)

    Intellectual, cultural, economic, and political origins of the French Revolution; a decade of revolution; the Napoleon Era; and the legacy of the revolution. Prerequisite: HIST 121 - Western Civilization 1500-1815  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 417 - Hitler and Nazi Germany


    (3 S.H.)

    Emphasis will be given to the factors which led to Nazism, the personality of Hitler, his drive for world domination, and the Nuremberg trials. Prerequisite: HIST 122 - Western Civilization 1815 to Present  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 421 - Tudor and Stuart England


    (3 S.H.)

    The transition from medieval to modern England, the Reformation, the Age of Elizabeth, and the constitutional and social conflicts of the 17th century. Prerequisite: HIST 121 - Western Civilization 1500-1815  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 423 - Modern England


    (3 S.H.)

    England in the modern era from the height of imperial power to the present. Grade only.
  
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    △ HIST 428 - The History of Biography


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an examination of the history of the literary form known as biography and autobiography. The course examines five different types of biographies that have evolved from the time of Plutarch to the present. Students will examine texts and determine what makes the biography effective (or not) as an illustration of the human condition. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 431 - Social Science/History Teaching Professional Capstone


    (3 S.H.)

    History 431 is a “capstone” course taught by a history professor that addresses numerous topics and themes important to aspiring social science/history teachers. The course will cover recent debates about the teaching of American, European, and world history. Additional topics include curriculum development, methods of historical inquiry, the use of primary and secondary sources in the classroom, creating active learning opportunities based on primary sources, the use of technology in student teaching and research, assignment design and evaluation, and the use of local history in Unit Plans. In addition, the course reviews state and national standards in the teaching of the social sciences. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 434 - Soviet Russia (1905-Present)


    (3 S.H.)

    The history of the Soviet Union and Russia during the 20th century. Topics include the 1905 and 1917 Revolutions, the development of the Soviet command economy, Stalin’s political purges and cultural revolution, World War II, and the Cold War. The course will also discuss the collapse of Soviet Communism and the Yeltsin era. Prerequisites: HIST 122 - Western Civilization 1815 to Present  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 440 - World War II


    (3 S.H.)

    An examination of the origins of both the European and Asian phases of the war and of the relationship between political leadership and military strategy. The course will also examine the political, social, and economic developments on the home fronts of the principal belligerents. Prerequisites: HIST 122 - Western Civilization 1815 to Present  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    △ HIST 447 - America in the Vietnam War Era


    (3 S.H.)

    An historical survey of the Vietnamese War with the growing American involvement and the subsequent American effort to disengage without loss of prestige. The course will include the study of American objectives in this war and the subsequent impact upon American society. Prerequisite:  ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 461 - Latin American Social Revolution


    (3 S.H.)

    An analysis of Latin American’s major revolutionary movements of the 20th century and their differing ideologies. Special emphasis on revolutionary movements in Mexico, Bolivia, Cuba, and Central America. Grade only.
  
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    △ HIST 463 - History of Mexico


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides an in-depth examination of the history of the Mexican nation from pre-historic times to the present. Themes discussed include the Native American and Spanish roots of Mexican culture, the coming of independence and the construction of the nation state, the liberal-conservative conflict, the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the continuing Mexican Revolution, and the rise of the neo-Porfirian state in recent decades. Grade only.
  
  •  

    △ HIST 467 - Foreign Travelers in “Exotic” Lands


    (3 S.H.)

    This course is designed to provide students with an opportunity to study select British and American travelers in the 19th and 20th centuries who visited and wrote about “Exotic” places such as South America, Mexico, Africa, or the South Sea Islands. The course explores what happens to these writers at the “point of contact” and will critique their subsequent evaluations of the different cultures that they visited. Grade only.
  
  •  

    HIST 468 - History of the Andean Nations


    (3 S.H.)

    This course provides students with an in-depth examination of the history of the Andean nations of Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, and Bolivia from pre-Hispanic times to the present. Emphasis will be placed on the development of an indigenous culture’s adaptation to their environment; the emergence of sophisticated urban traditions and cultures; the growth of the Inca empire; the encounter with the Spanish in the 16th century; the evolution of a unique Andean culture; the growing conflicts within the imperial system that led to independence; the quest for nationhood and modernization in the 19th century; and the rise of populism, social reformers, militarism, drug trafficking, and other current challenges. Grade only.
  
  •  

    HIST 469 - History of Brazil


    (3 S.H.)

    Brazilian history from European discovery to the present. The course emphasizes Portuguese exploration and colonization, the development of slavery and its abolition, and Brazil’s experience with industrialization and world power status. Grade only.
  
  •  

    HIST 476 - The American Revolution


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines the origins of the Revolution; the War for Independence; social, economic, and cultural change during the Revolution; and the origins, and creation, and ratification of the Constitution of 1787. Prerequisite: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
  •  

    HIST 477 - The Age of Jackson


    (3 S.H.)

    Traces the political, social, intellectual, and cultural development of the United States from the 1820s through the 1840s. Topics include Jacksonian politics, Manifest Destiny and the Mexican War, northern society, the South and slavery, ante-bellum reform movements and Romanticism. Prerequisite: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865 . Grade only.
  
  •  

    HIST 478 - The Old South


    (3 S.H.)

    This course examines many issues, topics, and themes central to the history of the American South (ca. 1800 to 1860). Among the key topics that we look at are the colonial origins, the origins and evolution of planter culture, the nature of yeomen society, the diverse lives of southern women, the economics of slavery, slave life and culture, the politics of slavery and the coming of the Civil War, and the rise and fall of the Confederacy. Grade only.
  
  •  

    HIST 479 - The Civil War and Reconstruction


    (3 S.H.)

    Explores the culture and society of ante-bellum America, origins of the war, and political and military development of the war. The course will then explore Reconstruction of the Southern political, social and economic orders and the southern counter-revolution of the 1870s. Prerequisite: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 480 - Gilded Age of America (1877-1900)


    (3 S.H.)

    Explores late 19th-century corporate, industrial development and its social, cultural and political consequences. The course pays special attention to both old-fashioned, communitarian counter-attacks and progressive, radical opposition to the new economic order in rural and urban settings. It also explores the mass immigration and new urban political and social structures that economic change generated. The course concludes with consideration of the emergence of the New Empire amidst the Spanish-American War. Prerequisites: HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  and ENG 111 - College Reading and Writing  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 481 - American Westward Expansion


    (3 S.H.)

    Examines the historical West versus the mythical West. Compares stereotypes and popular images of the West and its inhabitants to the cultural, political, and social diversity of the American West. Traces the development of Western history from first contact to the present. Prerequisites: HIST 150 - United States History to 1865  and HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    HIST 483 - The Progressive Era and the “New Era” Twenties(1901-1929)


    (3 S.H.)

    Consideration will be given to the cultural and economic crisis of the 1890s, the progressive impulse, varieties of progressive reform, progressive foreign policy and World War I, postwar adjustment problems and select social phenomena of the Twenties. The course will conclude with study of Herbert Hoover’s economic and political vision. Prerequisite: HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
  
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    △ HIST 484 - Depression, New Deal and War (1929-1945)


    (3 S.H.)

    The course explores the Great Depression, which began in 1929 with emphasis on the economic, social and psychological causes and consequences, Herbert Hoover’s responses to it and FDR’s New Deal Revolution, and the role of the United States in World War II and developments on the home front. Prerequisite: HIST 151 - United States History Since 1865  or instructor’s permission. Grade only.
 

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